New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, November 24, 1983 : Front Page

Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung November 24, 1983

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - November 24, 1983, New Braunfels, Texas -ct : nitch worpbIe ir. 0 . DOX ^5 ^3 O holies, iVXpc, 759/1,5M Have a Happy Thanksgiving Bar owners get signatures to force vote on repeal ByDYANNEFRY Staff writer Locals in the bar business say they have more than enough signatures to force a public referendum on City Council's proposal to shorten the drinking hours. Crystal Chandelier owner John Rabon said there were seven petitions circulating in the city, and that they already have “well in excess" of the 109 names needed to bring the matter to a vote. But the night club owners plan to keep collecting signatures through Monday, and then see what happens at the council meeting that night. Council will take its second vote on an ordinance repealing the 1979 ordinance that allowed local liquor establishments to apply for 2 a.m. permits. The repeal ordinance passed 6-1 on first reading. If it passes again, "then we’ll probably file (the petition) with the city secretary on Tuesday,” Rabon said. The petition doesn’t ask people to take a stand either for or against late-hours drinking, he added. It simply states that the matter should be decided by the general citizenry. “I think at least three of the people that have signed don’t even go to bars,” Rabon said. If the petition has at least 109 valid signatures (IO percent of the number that voted in the last municipal election), council’s action may be stopped before the third and final reading of the ordinance.Cheer Fund We at the Herald-Zeitung hope that you enjoy your Thanksgiving Day dinner. We’d also like you to think about what the day would be like if you couldn’t afford it.... Okay. Now that you’ve thought about that, we’d like you to think about the Christmas season. We need you to help us help local families who might otherwise go without the traditional Christmas feast. We call this project the “Cheer Fund,” and we had our first one last year. The response was tremendous. We received over $2,000 in contributions and boxes upon boxes of food, which helped us feed 60 needy families. We start this year’s fund with a balance of $565.31 left over from last year. To help kick off this year’s fund drive, we have received the following contributions from our employees: That gives us a starting balance of $700.31 The procedure for this year’s drive will be the same as last year’s. We will accept cash contributions or nonperishable food items at our offices at 186 S. Castell Ave. Names (rf contributors will be published daily. Pickup of donated food items can be made by contacting Circulation Manager Don Avery, 625-9144. Last year was a tough year e ^    ,    ...    economically, and yet everybody gave Fr«d »nd Ann Tramontano............... *10    .    ''    *    .    *    '    .    . Mr and Mrs. Diva Kramer............... *35    ^ amounts far greater than we had Robwt and Su« johnson..................*20    anticipated. We again appeal for your Don and Carol Avary.................... *25    help in brightening what would f c*La*at»f amil *    *20    otherwise be a bleak Christmas for Mr and Mrs Odell Moose .................*5    many local residents. A New <iislskU Braunfels Nut Braunfels. Texas Herald-Zeltuno  o e—: ---Vol.    92    -    No.    234 THURSDAY November 24,1983 25 cents 20 Pages —2 Sections (USPS 377-880) 'May I have your attention, please?' AWMIU up    nxrwwiw These inhabitants of Weaners Turkey Farm on Highway 46 South seem to expect some sort of speech from an intruding photographer Undoubtedly, they're somewhat relieved that it's Thanksgiving Day and they're not on somebody's dinner table yet. But there s always Christmas. GENEVA, Switzerland (AP) - The Kremlin on Wednesday broke off U.S.-Soviet talks on limiting medium-range nuclear missiles in Europe, reacting swiftly to West German approval of NATO’s deployment plan. President Reagan and other Western leaders said they regretted the Soviet walkout, which came less than 12 hours after the West German Parliament voted. In West Germany, the government said the first components of U.S.-built Pershing 2 missiles arrived after the Parliament vote, but refused to say where. U.S. informants who requested anonymity said the components probably were flown to the Ramstein Air Base, where German police intensified security, detained nine reporters and confiscated their film. Soviet negotiator Yuli A. Kvitsinsky left the session at the U.S. mission in Geneva after 25 minutes, wading through a crowd (rf anti-missile protesters and saying only that the talks had been “discontinued" indefinitely. U.S. negotiator Paul H. Nitze called the move "unjustified and unfortunate.” He said the United States was ready to halt or reverse missile deployment if both sides agree to reduce or remove European medium- Reagan regrets talks walkout by Soviet Union range nuclear missile forces. In Washington, Reagan said he was disappointed but not surprised by the Soviet walkout, and pledged to "do everting we can to bring them back.” The Soviets have threatened repeatedly to quit the Geneva talks if NATO deployment proceeds, but Kvitsinsky's use of the term "discontinued” implied the Kremlin might agree to resume the discussions later. It was unclear whether suspension (rf the lntermediate-range talks would affect the parallel U.S.-Soviet Stategic Arms Reduction Talks. The next round of START discussions are scheduled Tuesday in Geneva. "I don’t know what will happen then, but you know that high Soviet officials have repeatedly said that the deployment of Euromissiles will also effect START,” Soviet mission spokesman Vladimir Evdokuchine told The Associated Press. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization plans to install 572 single-warhead Pershing 2 and cruise missiles in Western Europe starting next month to counter 243 triple-warhead Soviet SS-20 missiles already deployed. Rhoads says syringes misused by youth By DEBBIE DeLOACH Staff writer Their faces took on a look of astonishment when he said it. The audience was even more shocked when a local pharmacist nodded his head in agreement "I was told that between 40-50 syringes a weekend are sold to teenagers in the New Braunfels area, so they can shoot up on drugs,” Dennis Rhoads, chairman of Comal Chemical Abuse Program, said at a town meeting Nov. 21 "Is that about right?” he asked, looking over to pharmacist Ray Mendez, who works at City Pharmacy Mendez nodded. A woman sighed, and mumbled, "Oh, my gosh That’s terrible.” Rhoads had made his point Local pharmacists were given equal time Wednesday. Most agreed there was a "potential for abuse,” but they varied on actual numbers. Legitimate uses do exist for the syringes, which are sterilized for onetime use, and are usually stocked in packages (rf IO and boxes of IOO. The syringes are not easily accessible at any of the local pharmacies contacted. Instead, all syringes are kept behind the counter, and a person has to ask for them. That gives the pharmacist some degree of control. At City Pharmacy, Mendez said he sells 20-30 syringes in packages of IO on sn average weekly basis. “That’s three sales, and I’d say once every three months, I tell a teenager “no ’ "But I have to add that’s more an exception than the rule,” he said quickly. Saying no' means the pharmacist has some doubt about the person doing the asking. Lloyd Schlameus at Peerless Pharmacy said it happens "very rarely" in New Braunfels "But it was very common in other places I worked in Austin and Fort Worth, and that was IO years ago,” Schlameus said. John Gates at Lands Pharmacy was absolute with his comments. "We keep them (syringes) behind the counter. We regulate who we sell them to, and we tell all youngsters “no’ unless we know their medical history.” Has Gates ever refused to sell a syringe to a questionable teenager? "Local kids, no, absolutely not,” he replied. “It happens rarely here, mostly in the summer when the tourists come into town.” He was totally against any law regulating the sale of syringes in Texas. “We’re over-regulated as it is,” he said. Schlameus and Mendez indicated another regulation wouldn’t hurt. “I don’t think we need any more regulations, but if it comes to that, I could live with it,” Mendez said. "But I don’t know if a law is really the answer. I think it goes back to the See DRUGS, Page 12AInsideToday's Weather Sunny and pleasant today with the high in the upper 60s and light winds. Forecast for the remainder of the holiday weekend calls for partly cloudy and mild Friday and Saturday, turning mostly cloudy and cooler on Sunday.Darlin' Billies The New Braunfels Unicorns have no motivation problem for Friday’s playoff contest with Brownsville Pace. The thought of another shot at Fredericksburg is more than enough to get them psyched up. See Sports, Page SA.Spurs Lose...Again For the second night in a row, the San Antonio Spurs ran off to a big lead. And for the second straight night, they couldn’t hold it. Hie Philadelphia 76’ers used a fourth quarter surge to be the Spurs, 113-105, Wednesday night. See Sports. Page SA. CLASSIFIED.....................S-7B COMICS..........................3B CROSSWORD.....................3B DEAR ABBY.......................2A HOROSCOPE......................2A KALEIDOSCOPE....................1B OPINIONS........................AA SCRAPBOOK......................2B SPORTS.......................6    JJA STOCKS............ 3A TV LISTINGS......................3B WEATHER........................3A Good eating?) First graders give Turkey Day recipes By WANDA LASATER Kaleidoscope editor All holidays have a focal point and for Thanksgiving that is food and its preparation. Cooks spend days preparing pumpkin pies, stuffing and the main course turkey. Youngsters enjoy watching their mothers sift, measure, pour and stir concoctions which soon fill the house with an aroma that is only found during the holidays. Those same youngsters have formulated their own recipes for the traditional Thanksgiving feast Students in Kathy Hinman's first-grade grade class at Lone Star Primary compiled a cookbook especially for the holidays. Following are their ideas of how to prepare a feast. BERKA’S BREAD 2 water 3 salt 4 flour Mix with a spoon and cook for 30 minutes at hot MICHAEL’S CHEESE NOODLES I box of noodles butter milk cheese Boil water; put noodles in for I hour Put butter, milk, cheese m the noodles Put on the table. STEVE’S FRUIT Apples Oranges Bananas Watermelon Peel all the fruit. Cook in oven for 3 minutes at 5 degrees. ZANDRA’S TURKEY Cut the turkey open Put stuff in and cook for 2 hours at 3 degrees SHERRY’S PUMPKIN PIE 4 taps. sugar the inside of a pumpkin Mix it all up and cook in the oven for 5 minutes at IOO degrees MATTHEW STURKEY I tsp salt and pepper dressing Put it all in a pot and cook for IO minutes at 50 degrees. CHRIS M.’S TURKEY AND DRESSING IO peppers 20 tomatoes 4 cucumbers Mix it all together and put with turkey. Cook for 20 hours at very hot. JAMIE'S CHICKEN spices gravy 3 gallons crunchy stuff Mix it all together and cook for 2 minutes on warm. DAVID’S CRESENT ROLLS 8 pieces (rf dough 8 hot dogs cheese Roll out dough; tear it into 8 pieces. Cut slits in the hot dogs and put them in the 8 pieces of dough. Cook for 12 nunutes at 375 degrees ALFRED’S J ELLO fruit-pears, I apple buy jello from store Cut fruit in little pieces. Pour jello in bowl and put in freezer for 5 minutes. RITA’S TURKEY potatoes a little salt and pepper See RECIPES, Page UA ;

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Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Issue Date: November 24, 1983

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