New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, April 19, 1983, Page 10

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 319,437

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - April 19, 1983, New Braunfels, Texas Tarzan IO    New Braunfels Herald-ZeitungMarmaduke Tuesday, April 19,1983 Robot exposition Mechanical contraptions whirr and dick,work and play “Can we borrow your TV until ours is fixed?” CHICAGO (AP) — It looks like a huge elephant’s trunk, but it can delicately pick up an egg and put it in a holder or take a ball and drop it through a basketball hoop. Although the robot from Sweden is not yet dunking shots, it is one of the flashiest players at the Robots 7 Conference and Exposition that has turned McCormick Place — Chicago’s lakefront exhibition center — into a wonderland of 250 hissing, whirring, light-blinking contraptions that can do about everything but clean fingernails. The exhibit, which opened Monday, is billed as the biggest industrial robot show ever staged, drawing products from 175 robot builders in 12 countries — $750 million worth of engineering. At $15 a ticket, the show, open to the public, is expected to draw 30,000 people for its three-day run. But the exhibitors mostly hope to attract manufacturers interested in buying robots for their factories. Many of the robots are programmed to ham it up to draw crowds to the various booths, like the 13-foot model from Spine Robotics, with its elephant-trunk-like arm able to reach nearly 16 feet. “The Spine Robot can reach everywhere — from behind, from below, from the front and around,’’ said Per Lenschow, control systems manager. In a United States Robots display from King of Prussia, Pa., three blue robots warm up like football players — raising and lowering their “necks” and stretching their “arms.” “Among the many things these robots can do on a diet of electricity is put together their own motors,” he said. “It’s the nearest thing to propagation in the robot world.” One of the biggest showoffs at the exhibit is “T3-726,” the brainchild of Cincinnati Milacrom. It lures crowds to the company’s exhibit by dealing cards, explaining the rules of blackjack, calling out point totals and announcing winners. It keeps track of what has been played and knows how many cards are left in the deck and what their values are. When the robot has a blackjack hand totaling 16 points — with 21 points needed to win — it points to the ceiling and says, “Look at that,” and pulls a 5-card from behind its back. In other words, it cheats. at 3jI5’ OVE? ~-£ cee cees Oc esse.KE SKS S-’EKS LlWTlU ~E soma* * CAK •’•'VIN a-OSE S- K WAS SOjs? cee Ace CA'    5So+ Crossword ACROSS I Finished 5 Old s name 10 Plats 14 Sinful 15 Mom aged 16 Instrument 17 Humana 19 Farm tool 20 Followed 21 Runaways 23 Card 26 Verse 27 Tape — 30 Balloting 34 Affirm 36 Length unit 37 Damage 38 Performed 39 Cutters 41 Food fish 42 Avenging doit, 43 Stands up 44 Dither 45 Brand new 47 And Others 60 Cop, 11 1.1 rn source 52 Mann# per 66 Branched 60 Vetch 61 Let-down 64 Continent 65 Quebec university 66 Babylonian god 67 Eye part 68 Musty 69 Food fare DOWN t Obligation 2 Preposition 3 1492 ship 4 Poi) goer 5 Gadget 6 Unwell 7 Citrus drink 8 Hawaiian bird 9 Museum fan SUNDAY'S PUZZLE SOLVED TV listings CABLE pm (21 USA Usa Network (31 KSAT CH.12 San Antonio (4! KMOL CH 4 San Antonio (5l KENS CH 5 San Antonio (Bl RLRN CH 9 San Antonu (7) CNN Cabio News Ntwr HU CBN Christian Natwrk (131 KWEX CH.41 San Antonio c°o 0 30 Radio 1990 Sports look Family Feud P M Magazine News Entertainment Tonight News Peoples Court Business Report MacNeii Leh rer Report Moneyline Crossfire Prog Cont d Soledad Cheaptnto mm OO j 30 NBA Playoffs Happy Pays Laverne & Shirley A Team Gun Shy Now We're Cookin' San Antonio Ptrspective Lawmakers Prime News I Spy Sabot Latino q0° 030 M Three s Company 9 to 5 Remington Steele Movie The Miracle of Kathy Miller' Nova rn 700 Club Gabnol y Cabriole 0 0 0 <•> cr> Collage Baskttbaii Hart to Hart St Elsewhere - American Playhouse Freeman Reports Star Time 24 Horas Reporter 41 i A OO IO1® Aloha Classic News M’A'S'H News Tonight Show News Jeffersons Dr Who Sports Tonight Crossfire Another Life Pelicula: 'De Pedro Desconocido 0 0 0 <*> Hot Spots Charlie's Angels Late Night with Oavid Rockford Files Reflections of Medea Newsmght Moneyline Update Burna ft Allen Jack Benny Show - 12” Radio 1990 Nightlme Last Word Letterman NSC News Overnight Baretta Sign Off People Now With Bill Tush I Married Joan My Little Margie Oespedida CABLE pm (171 SHONA Showtime (191 NICK Nickelodeon (201 WTBS Atlanta (21) HEALTH Cable Health Na (22l HWGN Chicago (23] ESPN Sports Network (24] GALA SIO Galeviston | (25] N HBO Home Box Office 6“ Making of Raiders of the Lost Ark Kids Writes Black Beauty Carol Burnett Bob Newhart Show Nature of Things barney Miller Major league Baseball: ESPN NBA Tonight NBA Basketball: Pelicula Aquellos Anoa Locos' Prog ConTd 7“ Movie ‘Atlantic City' The Tomorrov People Against the Odds Cries From the Peep Parti Cable Health World Report Everybody's Children Chicago Cub at Philadelphia 1983 Opening Round Playoff Game Dancm' Days Philip Marlowe. Private Eye £ S OO « Month in the Country TBS Evening News Fast Forward Special Presentation - - El Estudw de Lola Movie Excelibur' 9- The Paper Chase Hugh Downs Major Leegut Baseball: Atlanta at San Otego Human Sexuality Crisis Counselor News To Be Announced Pelicula Billy Jack' j 10: Friends 4 Couples New Pay in Eden Spotlight rn Nature of Things Everybody s Children Charlie's Angels ESPN SporteCenter - Greet Pleasure Hunt ll ii: Movie Hearts and Minds Sign Off • Fast Forward Special Presentation Movie: The Big USFL Football Loa Angelet at Tampa Pelicula: 'El Arracacha' Movie: Soup for One' 12: Movie Movie On the Threshold of Space' Cable Health World Report Human Sexuality Carnival' Bey - - Scouts change strategy, reap membership boom IRVING (AP) -Unable to relate the decades-old motto of “Be Prepared" with the youth of the 1970s, the Boy Scouts of America succeeded in mapping out a strategy of policy and program changes to make Scouting more relevant and reversed a trend of decreasing membership. The plan, mapped out by J.L. Tarr, is pushing membership upwards, officials said. The group now claims 3.3 members and an annual growth rate that rivals the Boy Scouts’ glory days of the 1960s. Scout executives say their decision to create a fourth branch and admit boys at an earlier age may have been the most important factor in the turnaround. Since it was introduced last September, the Tiger Cub program has enrolled more than 84,000 7-year-old boys who accounted for 86 percent of all new Scouts signed up during that period. “Weare out to hit new kids and get them interested in Scouting,” said Mike Whittaker, Scouts' director of advertising. “Tiger Cubs is one way to do that." Other strategies included uniform modifications, a new program that teaches Scouts to care for themselves when home alone and two new merit badges — Handicapped Awareness and American Culture. Scouting executives also acknowledge that the turnaround can be attributed in part to external factors, such as increased conservatism Tarr says he believes the membership surge will continue, and he points to the November 1979 capture of the American embassy rn Iran as the turning point. “There was the realization that we weren’t as good as we thought we were,” he said. “There was a sudden return to the values (President) Reagan has emphasized — personal responsibility and patriotism." “There was,” he added, “a return to the values of Scouting." The Boy Scouts, who moved    their headquarters to this Dallas suburb in 1979 from Ninth Brunswick, N.J., say they face obstacles that never occurred to leaders in years past. “There are those who challenge us," said Tarr, himself a former Cub Scout ‘‘Ult) challenge us on homosexuality. They want girls in the Cub Scouts. Atheists want to lead troops. Women want to lead troops. People want more sports in our programs. ' We're under attack from all sorts of people. They don't un- Electrical mishap burns worker, darkens Lamar U. derstand," he said. Tarr said he spends much of his time traveling around the world to “involve world leaders in Scouting." His staff of 525 is in charge of coordinating Scout programs through six regional offices. Nationwide, there are 413 local Scouting councils, 132,360 Cub packs and Boy Scout troops, 3,340,685 Scouts and 117,000 adult volunteers. In Irving, the staff processes orders for uniforms, writes Scout literature, publishes Boys Life magazine, collects registration fees and plans Jamborees This    year, the national    headquarters will spend about $26 million    just to administer    the empire. Almost all Scouting revenue    comes from members, with about $11 million from registration fees, $8.3 million from sales of American Cancer Society LOOCK**)    ANH* nm uniforms, literature and camping supplies, $2.2 million from local council fees and $600,000 from the sale of Boys Ijfe magazine. Controller Tom Wagner said 80 percent of that money is spent on staff salaries. But the $26 million operating budget is only part of what Scouting leaders raise and spend The largest source of income is the Campaign for Character,” a drive to raise $49 million to pay for the relocation of the national headquarters and the marketing of the Scouting program during the 1900s ****** ***«] READINGS CONFIDENTIAL + _i Contact    •] * SISTER . * ★ DIVINE * *| 629-1416 Come and see wily you1 *’*•    /    ’ i;; v "i*.    * .* Cl.N .....IM to *.t all tamny affairs rn 7 AM TO IO PM DAILY ai rn 241 loop 337-Mwv 41 » L '*<#»* won Mort* alw J *    - S' ..    • ... LAS • . - k amy* • % rn m IOO* toil I MOI AH Mi Atilt SIGM «. (it I * *»*••• « BEAUMONT, Texas (API — Power and phone service at I .amar University were knocked out in an electrical accident which burned a worker, college and utility officials said. Wilbert    “Clyde” Lyons, 53,    of Vidor, suffered second- and third-degree burns over 50 percent of his body when an electrical arc formed while he was changing a fuse, officials said. He was    in stable condition Monday night at Baptist Hospital of Southeast    Texas, a hospital spokeswoman Prescriptions for Peace of fTlind: said. David White, a spokesman for Gulf States Utilties, said the mishap occurred sometime between 8:30 am. and 9 am. “He went into the switching station ... and was trying to take a fuse out when something created an electrical arc and burned him,” White said Richard Dixon, public information officer for the university, said the entire campus lost power at 9 a m. when a switch gear shorted and burned at one of I dinar's main power stations at the corner of Fast Virginia and University Drive. He said the campus was closed at 4:30 p m “There will be no night classes, but we hope to have power restored in time for 8 am.    classes tomorrow," he said. False Carpet-cleaning Economy is..... 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