New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, January 5, 1983

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

January 05, 1983

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Issue date: Wednesday, January 5, 1983

Pages available: 63

Previous edition: Tuesday, January 4, 1983

Next edition: Thursday, January 6, 1983

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - January 5, 1983, New Braunfels, Texas Dallas, Texas fit cr Of. lac.    Comp. -ct : Hitch womr Ie 1.0. t>ojf ^5^3c Dalits, Trxfl* 75?U$ Fire chiefs of 1982 — Elmer Zipp retired, Darwin Wetz resigned, and Jack Wilson took his place Lots of new faces Staff turnover dominated city in 1982 By DYANNE FRY Staff writer part one of two It’s been a year of changes for the City of New Braunfels — especially in personnel. Since the courthouse bells rang in Jan. 1,1982, the city has gotten a new public works director, a new sanitarian, a new director of parks and recreation and a new city attorney. A policeman was fired in February, and the echoes are still being heard at City Hall. The Fire Department has operated under three different chiefs, and a new man is sitting in the fire marshal’s seat Some of the changes took place in an orderly fashion. City Sanitarian Charlie Smith retired April 30, to be replaced by a younger assistant, Rick Lane. Public Works Director Tex Yeary stepped down in January, but still does some contract work for the city. His old job was taken by former building codes inspector Fred Ryden Disorder marked the course of other personnel stories. Take, for example, the dismissal of patrolman Domingo Herrera after ll years on the force. It started with a fund drive for the Muscular Dystrophy Association. Local policemen manned street corners and collected more than $1,600, but Police Chief Burney Boeck found $50 missing at the end of the day. The testimony of a witness, coupled with polygraph tests, convinced Boeck that Herrera had taken the money. The chief fired him on Feb. 19 and issued a report to City Hall. A Grand Jury reviewed the case in March, but found insufficient evidence to indict Herrera for theft. Within the week, some 50 members of New Braunfels’ Hispanic community staged a march on City Hall, protesting the patrolman’s dismissal. Some of the same people, led by Aguinaldo “Nayo” Zamora, came to City Council on April 12 to demand an investigation of the incident. One of See CITY, Page 12A A New Braunfels Hora New Braunfels, Texas Vol. 92 - No. 3 Zeitung oQ 117”    & :_ <    xortinnc WEDNESDAY January 5, 1983 25 cents 28 Pages —3 Sections (USPS 377-880'Sniffer dogs to debut this month By JACQUELINE SMITH Staff writer The first formal inspection of New Braunfels schools for illegal drugs and alchohol should take place this month. Supt. O.E. Hendricks is expecting Securities Associates International to return to the district before the end of January with its sniffer dogs to search campuses. “They’ll more than likely be in this month to patrol the parking area and halls,” he told school trustees Tuesday. “We expect them back sometime later this month...but unannounced.” SAI was hired by the New Braunfels Independent School District late last year to keep local campuses free from drugs and alcohol and to educate students of the dangers involved in their use. Shortly before school recessed for the Christmas holidays, representatives from SAI visited campuses to See DOGS, Page 12A Gramm quits House seat AUSTIN (API U.S. Rep Phil Gramm submitted his resignation to Gov. Bill Clements today, saying in a one-line letter that he will vacate his congressional post at the close of business today. Clements said he received the letter about 10:15 a.m. and immediately sent it to Secretary of State David Dean, who will advise the governor on the process and procedures of calling a special election. “If that is w hat he 1 Gramm I w ants is a special election and that is what the law provides, I will call one,” Clements said. Gramm in hts letter did not mention a special election or say if he would quit the Democratic Party and seek to regain his seat as a Republican. Gramm earlier had told Republicans he intended to resign his seat and run as a Republican, a source in Washington told The Associated Press. The congressman had scheduled an ll a m. CST news conference in Bryan to announce his plans. The House Steering and Policy Committee voted 26-4 Monday to oust Gramm from the Budget Committee where he spearheaded the campaign for President Reagan's economic package. GOP congressional leaders, however, have said they will recommend a place be reserved for Gramm on that panel if he regains his House seat as a Republican. Gramm could have opted to switch parties without resigning._But some ooservers said seeking re-election as a Republican could be politically astute because Democrats would have little time to prepare for a special election. Gramm returned to his Texas district Tuesday to pore through 2,000 letters he received amid speculation that he would switch parties. See GRAMM, Page 12AStudying the matter New Braunfels school board members Don Bedford (left) and Garland Lloyd carefully consider the district's expansion plans at Tuesday's board meeting. Architects have presented the school Staff photo by Jackie Smith board with a $11 million list of suggestions as to how the New Braunfels school district can be expanded to meet its growing population. A workshop will be held next weekComal ISD to appeal ruling on Encino Park By DEBBIE DeLOACH Staff writer Comal Independent School District trustees put on boxing gloves Tuesday night, swinging to appeal the deannexation of Encino Park to Northeast Independent School District in Bexar County. After an almost two-hour executive bout with CIS!) Attorney Lonnie Churm, the board’s intentions came from Trustee David Boatner: “I make a motion, instructing our attorney to appeal to the Commissioner of Education, and to pursue our share of the bonded indebtedness.” The vote was unanimous. The Encino Park deannexation fight began over three years ago, and came to a head on Dec. 6 of last year. CISD Supt. Edgar Willhelm appeared before the Bexar County Commissioner’s Court, acting as the county’s Board of Education, and asked that the deannexation request be denied. “Encino Park is by far the most valuable portion of CISD’s Bexar County area in terms of future tax revenue,” Willhelm said, and “the proposed detachment would set a dangerous precedent for future attempts of detachment of CISD territory.” The Bexar County Commissioner’s Court took the matter under advisement, then ruled in favor of the detachment on Dec. 13. The disputed area involves a 4.84-square-mile tract within CISD, which includes the Encino Park subdivision. Only a handful of school-age children live in the area now . But an estimated 2,500 students are expected to reside there by 1985. “The main thrust behind our action last night is we want, as a school board, to protect the integrity of this district’s boundaries,” Willhelm said Wednesday. "And we feel this is setting too dangerous of a precedent to go unnoticed.” The CISD school board had 30 days from the date of the Bexar Commissioner’s Court’s ruling, to announce a notice of appeal. The Commissioner of Education also has a 30-day time limit to hold a hearing. “This same Commissioner of Education made a decision in June, similar to our situation, but in Mansfield Independent School District,” Willhelm said Wednesday. “He ruled that both Commissioner’s Courts in Tarrant and Johnson counties had to agree, not just one. It’s an old law, but it’s still on the statutes.” Possible rulings from the Commissioner of Education boil down to two basic choices: “He’ll either decide that just Bexar County's okay is all that is needed, or he’ll rule the issue has to go to Comal County Commissioner’s Court, too.” A condition to the detachment from (TSI) and the annexation to NEIS!) is that the bonded indebtedness affecting the territory bt* adjusted. Encino Park, represented by New Braunfels attorney Bennie Bock II, have outlined a desire to entirely pay off the 26,260.64 bonded indebtedness represented by the subdivision. “The real contrast on this issue is this,” Willhelm added. "It’s the developers who are pushing for deannexation. They say the people out there want to detach. But the people aren't there yet." In other action Tuesday, the board voted unanimously for long-term suspensions of a freshman and a sophomore, both from Smithson Valley High School. The suspension is in connection with a Dec. 8 incident, in w hich the students were accused of possession of marijuana on the school campus. Sunrise, sunset Panel votes to abolish Utilities Commission Inside AUSTIN (AP) — The state’s controversial Public Utility Commission may face a tough fight in the legislature after the state Sunset Advisory Commission voted to get rid of it. The panel seemed to surprise even itself Tuesday when its members voted 7-3 for abolition of the eight-year-old agency after meeting for 24 hours on other matters. The commission’s action is only a recommendation to the legislature, which convenes Jan. ll, but ensures that complaints about the agency will get serious attention from lawmakers. Sunset Commission members themselves said they do not expect the legislature to disband the PUC, but called the vote a "strong message” for reform. In its last meeting, on Dec. 17, the commission rejected a plan to improve the PUC by establishing a counsel to represent residential ratepayers and eliminating the fuel adjustment clause — an automatic pass-through to customers when fuel costs go up. Supporters of the reform package vowed to try again. Sen. Kent Caperton, D-Bryan, tried to reintroduce the reform legislation Tuesday, but Sen. Ed Howard, D-Texarkana and Sunset chairman, said the motion was out of order. Caperton seemed ready to give up when former Legislative Budget Board Director Vernon McGee moved for abolition of the PUC. “Our message was that the Public Utility Commission can only be viable if changes are made to keep the agency from being controlled by the industry,” said Consumers Union Texas Director Carol Barger, a member of the Sunset committee. The vote came after the commission approved minor changes in the Railroad Commission and State Board of Insurance — but voted to keep them. Until Tuesday’s action, the commission, which reviews all state agencies regularly, had produced no recommendation on the three-member PUC despite intense feelings and lengthy testimony about the agency. Opponents of the PUC contend it is controlled by phone and fuel utilities, who regularly receive generous rate hikes from the agency. The PUC not only sets rates, but guarantees companies a rate of return, figuring in capital investments such as power plant construction. PUC Chairman Moak Rollins argues that the guaranteed rate of return actually saves ratepayers money by keeping the utility company’s bond rating up and cost of borrowing down. "I doubt seriously that it will happen,” Rollins said Tuesday of abolishing the agency. "This is a recommendation to the legislature. I don’t anticipate that it will be the final legislative action.” Today's Weather Comal County forecast calls for mostly cloudy and mild today, not so cold tonight, and partly cloudy and warmer Thursday. Winds will be easterly at 5-10 mph today, and southerly at less than IO mph tonight. Sunset will be at 5:46 p.m., and sunrise Thursday will be at 7-.27 arn. Cougars hold on Canyon’s Cougars took an exciting 41-35 victory over crosstown rival New Braunfels in the opener of district play for both teams Tuesday night at Canyon. Meanwhile, Smithson Valley rolled over Marble Falls. Details in Sports CLASSIFIED.....................6    8B COMICS..........................6C CROSSWORD.....................6C DEAR ABBY.......................3B DEATHS.........................2A ENTERTAINMENT.................11A HOROSCOPE......................2A KALEIDOSCOPE..................1-6B OPINIONS................... 4A SPORTS.......................8-10    A STOCKS........................12A TV LISTINGS....................   SC WEATHER........................3A NBISD tables debate on school needs Trustees started Tuesday to pick and chose among the $11 million worth of suggestions architects have for expanding the New Braunfels Independent School District. At the request of school board member Garland Lloyd, however, they stopped as quickly as they started. Lloyd asked that the discussion be postponed since he said, "it was not on the agenda and we’re not prepared.” Honoring his request, trustees agreed to meet next Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in the library of New Braunfels High School to hold a workshop session to decide which of the architects’ suggestions are most important. At their Dec. 7 meeting, trustees were presented with a $11 million "shopping list’’ from Jessen Associates Inc., the Austin architectural firm hired by the district to work on its expansion plans This shopping list, which has since become known as the "master plan,” included cost estimates for renovating the district’s campuses and construction a new elementary school to meet the district’s grow th. Prior to Lloyd’s request. Trustee Rudy Renner and NBISI) Supt. O.E Hendricks agreed that the “number one priority" among the $11 million list should be a new elementary school. “lf you’re asking for opinions — a new elementary school should be number one.” said Reimer. Hendricks concurred, but said the entire “elementary program of the district” — which called for the renovation of current elementary schools, should be “number one.” Rather than calling for separate bond issues, Renner felt the district should “call for a bond issue for the entire amount, rather than having one in 1983 and again in 1984 .” Trustee William l,ee reminded the board to keep in mind that other public entities — specifically the county, are currently considering See BONDS, Page 12A ;

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