New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, August 26, 1982

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

August 26, 1982

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Issue date: Thursday, August 26, 1982

Pages available: 28

Previous edition: Wednesday, August 25, 1982

Next edition: Friday, August 27, 1982

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - August 26, 1982, New Braunfels, Texas r    .    i<J    ic    rep ie* Inc    rvm--*jJallas, Texas #?5?~    :    Mit-ru    ’    comp, I ,,' “itch womfcie HH|HB^M||B||HBH|H|aHH||M|HHMH|aHHBHaBHHHaa|HH^Haa||a|MHB|BH|||HHa|||aaaBH|aa||a||a|^^^^^|^|M^^_|HH|a|M||HH itV New --1—I-1- BraunfelsHepald-Zeituns M/-y 1CQ    1/1 THURSDAY August 26, 1982 25 centsNew Braunfels, Texas    Vol.    91    -    No.    168    14    Pages    (USPS    377-880) A call to arms Texas key battlefield in political wars —Clements By JACQUELINE SMITH Staff writer “If the Democrats on the national level want to win (the presidency! in 1984 they understand that they'll have to carry Texas,” Gov. Bill Clements said Wednesday while in town campaigning. But Clements, the first Republican to be elected governor since Reconstruction, is not willing to let that happen as was evidenced from his appearance at an old-fashioned political rally Wednesday. “In this century there’s not been a Democrat elected president that didn’t carry Texas,” the Republican incumbent told those packed into the Civic Center for the rally, held in his honor. Texas has been chosen by the national Democratic Party as “the number one target” for replacing a Republican governor with a Democratic one, the Republican incumbent noted. “They understand that they'll have to unseat me to win. But my seat’s got glue on it they ain't gonna do it,” Clements boasted to an applauding audience. The governor's stop in New Braunfels was part of a six-dav “Round-up” tour of Texas. Prior to speaking at the Civic Center rally, which was well attended by local citizens, he stopped at New Braunfels High School to meet with New Braunfels teachers on their first day of in-service. Clements’ goal for this round-up tour, his press aides say, is to encourage citizens to register to vote, recruit volunteers and personally thank his grass root campaign workers. On hand for Wednesday’s rally was Congressman Tom Loeffler (R-Hunti and Texas Oilman Eddie Chiles, who also owns the Texas Rangers baseball team. Mayor D A Stratemann Jr. introduced the governor. With the New Braunfels High School Band playing in the background and campaign speeches, literature, posters and ballons filling tile room, Wednesday’s gathering had the feel of an oldfashioned campaign rally During his rally speech Clements touched on what he considered the major accomplishments of his term. Education, which he had spoken about earlier with New Braunfels teachers, led the list. Legislation passed during his term created a better teaching-learning environment by returning curriculum to basic subjects “tile three B’s" and by “getting discipline back in the school room,” Clements said. “These bills did what you told me you wanted done to establish a hard core baek-to-basics system," he noted. Clements also referred to the changes made through legislation which curbed social promotion of students and which required competency testing for new teachers. “This will put professionalism back in the school system a higher state of professionalism," the governor said. On the topic of crime. Clements noted that I out of Hi major pieces of legislation relating to crime and drugs” were passed in the last legislative session. “Instances of crime in 'Texas are not to be tolerated,” Clements said. “We’ve got the drug peddlers off the streets and in jail which is what we’ve tried to do.” Clements also credited his administration for bringing about “more effective state government.” “You wanted state bureaucracy reduced and we stopped it dead in its tracks," he said, referring lo reduction of 2.000 state employees. Clements also bragged on the states economy, saying, “When this fiscal year end on Aug. JI, we will have the largest surplus of any state in the nation    $1.J billion. “Only 20 states in the nation have a surplus and we’ve got 25 percent of the total surplus (of all states combined.” lie added. “Our state economy is the strongest in tile nation,” he added. “And it’s not an accident." Looking to 'maintain Texas' quality of life.” Clements noted that predictions show Texas growing 50 percent by the year 2,000. “Think of the pressures...how many more schools, water reserve...or whatever will we need to maintain and enhance the traditional quality of life for 5ft percent more people. “It s not just my problem, it’s your’s too. It has to do with future generations,” he said. “We must have good management. And we cannot turn the state over to an incompetent lawyer,” lie added, making a jab at 'Texas Attorney General Mark White, his Democratic opponent. Stuff photo bv Cmd)/ Huh,nelson Gov. Bill Clements makes a point Wednesday Governor touts work in aiding education Governor Bul Clements had no trouble in attracting the attention of teachers w hen he began talking about their salaries. Krum tin* reaction of the crowd, however, not everyone agreed with what he had to say about them. In town for a campaign rally Wednesday, the incumbent Republican governor .slopped off to briefly appear before New Braunfels teachers and administrators on their first day of in-service training. This appearance was significant for Clements in that Mark White, his Democratic opponent, has obtained the support of a couple state educator organizations, including the Texas Federation of Teachers and Texas State Teachers Association. Noting that teacher salaries have inc! eased approximately “45 percent since I took office," Clements said that at the beginning of his term iii 1M7H, the average Texas teacher salary was approximately $13,1)42. But due to pay raises which lie said he .supported, that average salary w ill jump to $19,019 this fall. Clements said. "Without considering the cost of living, our (teachers’ salaries! are slightly below the national average,” he observed. “With the increase (that he said he will recommend to the 1983 legislature) we will significantly above the national average." One teac her questioned how Clements arrived at the $19,OOO figure. “Does that include administrators salaries?" the teacher asked. Clements said it did not and a rumble of whispers could In* heard among the .crowd. The governor stressed his support of education “returning back to See CLEMENTS, Rage ll St.id photo by Cmd) Rn fuudson Clements addresses NBISD teachers prior to his rally at the Civic Center Load management will keep lid on electric bills, Sohn saysInside By HI NBY KRAUSSE Staff vvi it et Ail electric load management" program could save millions of dollars for New Braunfels Utilities and its customers, NBH General Manager Bob Sohn told industrial leaders Thursday at a breakfast meeting at Krause’s Cafe. And if saving money isn’t enough to spur cooperation iii a voluntary program, Sohn said tin* cost of building new power plants to meet a growing demand for electricity may force mandatory controls in the years ahead. Representatives from a dozen local industries were asked to meet with Utilities officials to form individualized plans to reduce or at least rearrange their kilowatt demand ” The Lower Colorado River Authority bills its customers, including Utilities, for the electricity they demand during tile authority's daily generating “peak.” That peak occurs sometime between 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. during the summer (and between 7:30 a.m. 9:30 am. iii winter! and if Utilities customers can reduce their electric consumption during those hours, tile costs will go down. And even more importantly, the need to build more power plants, which Utilities must help pay for, will be postponed, Sohn said. In an interview Wednesday, Sohn said reducing the peak might involve changing high-powered operations to later or earlier hours. That s sure to create management problems for most industries, but Sohn thinks they’ll play ball when they see what’s at stake. And if they ask for something in return consideration on rates, for example Sohn said the answer would be “yes,” depending oil the sacrifice and savings they produce. “That w ill be developed w hen I start seeing their response, and of course that’s a political thing because the board ( NRU board of trustees) has to decide it and City Council has to approve it. "What this meeting’s for is to give them some ideas. What I really want at this point is their cooperation. They can help reduce the cost of utilities for everyone, not just themselves,” Sohn added. All Utilities customers, including commercial and residential, can help keep the Utilities “peak load to a minimum, said Penny Crawford, Utilities coordinator for load management. A program will lie set up for the smaller customers in three or four months, she said. But the industries were the first to get Sohn's pitch. Representatives from General Portland Inc., West Point Pepperell, U.S. Gypsum Co., Conroy Industries, Tempflex, Burkei Inc., Armstrong Machine Works Inc., New Braunfels Smokehouse and several others drank up some big numbers with their coffee. Utilities’ debt service requirements, the money required to pay off bonds for a new power plant, could jump to IO times the amount paid in 198ft 1981. That year, Utilities paid $2.15 million for bond indebtedness. The LURA is planning a third generating unit at its Fayette County power plant. Depending on interest rates, Utilities’ share may be anywhere from $15 million to $21 million by 199ft. See SOHN, Page 14Canyon loses tough one The Canyon Cougarettes showed a great deal of improvement Wednesday, but it wasn’t quite enough to best the Seguin l^ady Matadors. The I .ady Mats won a tough three-game match in Seguin. Sports. Page 5School's open Schools in the Comal Independent School District opened today, which means it’s time for motorists to once again watch their speed in school zones.Today's Weather Expect partly cloudy skies and hot weather this afternoon, with a 20 percent chance of thundershowers continuing through Friday. Tonight will be fair and warm. Winds today will be out of the southeast at 10-15 mph, increasing to 15-20 mph tonight and diminishing by morning. CLASSIFIED............11-14 COMICS.................10 CROSSWORD.............10 DEAR ABBY...............9 DEATHS.................14 HOROSCOPE..............2 KALEIDOSCOPE............9 OPINIONS................4 SCRAPBOOK..............8 SPORTS................5    6 STOCKS.................14 TV LISTINGS.............10 WEATHER................3 More troops land in Beirut to aid PLO evacuation J BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) More French and Italian peacekeeping troops landed in war-battered Beirut today and joined U S Marines in overseeing the evacuation of Palestine Liberation Organization fighters from the Israeli-ringed Lebanese capital. The Syrian army sent (ii trucks and tank carriers across Israeli lines to west Beirut to start a two-day overland evacuation to Syria F riday of 3,500 troops and officers of the Syrian-commanded Palestine Liberation Army, an Israeli army spokesman in Lebanon said I lebanon’s state radio and the Syrian government earlier said the Hittin Brigade evacuation on the Bel rut! lama scus highway would begin today depite the PlX)’s fear of attack from President-elect Gemayel’s Lebanese Christian militiamen. “There is no land evacuation today,” the Israeli military spokesman told reporters in suburban Baabda, five miles east of Beirut. A truck convoy carrying about 50ft PLO guerrillas was at the the U.S. Marine controlled port entrance at midday for sea evacuation to the Syrian port of Tartus But it was not clear whether any sea evacuation of the guerrillas was planned for today. Greek and Cypriot passenger ships took a total of 3,807 guerrillas to Jordan, Iraq. Tunisisa, South Yemen, Syria and Sudan in the past five days, according to lebanese and PLO estimates. Both contend the total of PLO guerrillas scheduled for evacuation was between 7,100 and 7,500 according to the plan U.S. presidential envoy Philip C. Habib had drawn for the PLO dispersal in the Arab world But Israel said 3.484 PLO already have been evacuated by boat out of a total of 8,074 slated for evacuation. There was a sharp decrease in farewell shooting as the caravan moved out from west Beirut. The Marines and PLO met Wednesday to make sure there w as no shooting once the guerrillas reached the port area. Lebanese police said nine civilians have been killed and 27 wounded in farewell shooting fusillades staged for the departing guerrillas each day since the evacuation began Saturday. F’ranee completed its cont! ibution to the multinational peacekeeping force when 450 paratroopers from the t’arcasonne-based 3rd Marine Infantry Regiment landed al the U.S.-controlled Beirut port at dawn. 'The contingent reinforced 351) Foreign Legion paratroopers at the central Museum Crossing at the “Green Line" dividing Beirut into Moslem and Christian sectors. A contingent of 250 Italian volunteers from the sharpshooters special forces unit. .sporting w hite helmets w ith black pluin-mage, came ashore from the landing craft Caorle two hours after the French. “We brought absolutely everything we will need, including two truckloads of pasta, and that means we w ill be completely self-supporting,” the Italian commander, Lt. Col. Bruno Tosetti told reporters. ;

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