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Lockhart Post Register: Thursday, September 29, 1960 - Page 1

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   Lockhart Post Register (Newspaper) - September 29, 1960, Lockhart, Texas                                10c Cock I) art JUoot-llcciiiotcf P.!:.    B:j.-: }. rail a.;, Tcxi; HIE LOCKHART POST Established 1899 Heart of the Seed Bin of Texas THE LOCKHART REGISTER Established 1879 EIGHTY-FIRST YEAR LOCKHART POST-REGISTER, LOCKHART, TEXAS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 19S0 NUMBER 39 Visiting Teacher Helps Raise School Attendance years the worked   in During the seven Visiting Teacher has Caldwell County attendance in the schools has climbed to a point where a high percetage of scholastics listed on the census attend school, Marlin Gunn, county superintendent, reports. The visiting teacher program provides a trained school man who is free of classroom duties to visit in the home for the school; gives assistance to the teachers and administrators on anv problems that necessitate work outside  the  school   plant; Thornberry Announces Military Academy Exams Austin - Congressman Homer Thornberry today scheduled n competitive Civil Service Screening Examination for young men of the IOth Congressional District who want to be considered for appointment to the United States Naval Academy, the United States Military Academy and the United States Air Force Academy. The screening examination will be given Saturday, November 12, at 8:30 a. m. at places to be designated by the Civil Service Commission. Thornberry announced that he will nominate 11 candidates for the Air Force Academy and authorize the Academy to select the best qualified candidate for the appointment. Each of the 11 candidates who qualifies on the entrance examination will be evaluated by the Academy on his high school academic achievement, extra-curricular activities, and on the recommendations from school principals and teachers. His entrance examination score will be combined with this evaluation to form a composite score. The candidate with the highest score will be offered the appointment by the Air Force, Thornberry said. Candidates to be eligible for appointment to the academies must be between the ages of 17 and 22, must be in excellent physical condition, and must be residents of the 10th Congressional District. The Congressman emphasized that this preliminary screening examination does not take the place of the entrance examination given by the Academies after his appointments are made, but is used only by him as a basis for his nominations. Congressman Thornberry said he must submit his nominations to the three Academies in early January, 1961 ; therefore, the November 12 examination will be the only one arranged for the 1961 nominations. Anyone interested in taking the screening examination should write to Congressman Thornberry at his Austin office, 308-A- U.S. Courthouse, Austin, Texas, no later than October 15 in order to meet the deadline for the November 12 examination and to obtain all pertinent information. GAH Gets Electric Power The final work which sent electricity to the Golden Age Home was made Thursday afternoon at 3:55 p.m. when City employees made a connection at the Home following release of power from the new LCRA substation a few minutes earlier. Sometime this week City crews are to complete the connection which will send power from the new substation on FM 20 to the o>d substation, which now becomes the City's power supply. It took only the closing of an air switch and six oil circuit breakers at the new station to send the power to the Home for the first time. gives migrant families a better concept of the overall aid of education and a better understanding of the school laws; increases interest of all school personnel in attendance; promotes school and community relationship. The attitude of the general public toward this program has been t cellent, he states. The realization that children need to attend r iooI regularly to obtain the full 1 cnefit of education has resulted i ; greater cooperation by the pub- . The interest has been keen enough in some cases that people have called the school inquiring why children are not in school. Occasionally Visiting Teacher Don Purswell finds children who are ten years old who have not been to school more than two years. The children who comprise this group are usually migrants who have moved here from other counties. This service is offered to all the school districts in the county. The week was divided among the four Independent School Districts and the one Common District. The Martindale, Prairie Lea and Lu!-ing Independent District were visited one day a week and the remaining two days were divided between Lockhart and St. John's. Each school district has a system whereby teachers make referrals through the principal, but the Visiting Teacher is invited to contact the classroom teachers for pertinent information where necessary. To secure better attendance the Visiting Teacher checks the school census against the school enrollment list, makes a home visit on referrals from the principal to check on non-attendance, on special problems, or excess absences. Complete reports are made to the principal. He also leaves a printed statement of school laws and importance of education at Spanish-speaking homes, in case they might not understand the visit. He contacts people in each district who might give information about migrant families coming and go-ins from the district. Last year this teacher was more active in working with the welfare agency in reporting and offering information to it pertaining to needy families, thus enabling children such as this to attend school more regularly. There are some weaknesses in the program, according to Mr. Gunn, but in checking them over it seems the weaknesses are not in the visiting teacher program, but in the schools themselves. There is an urgent need for dental and eye care existing in all schools. Cumpulsory attendance law could be improved so that students six years or older on or before September I be compelled to attend school 175 days instead of 120. Attendance has Ghown steady improvement so that there are only 3-5 percent on the census rolls who do not attend. These usually have graduated or have become so far behind in school they drop out. But an educational weakness is that migrant children are usually from 1-3 years behind, therefor from two to four years older in his grade than his classmates, but this is improving also. Mr. Gunn believes that the Visiting Teacher is a paying proposition in that it gets students in school, and this brings up the ada so that more teachers can be employed. Grand Jury Meets Monday The Caldwell County Grand Jury will meet Monday, Otober 3, to hear cases that need to be rrought before that body, Jimmie Harris, district clerk, reports. Approximately 45 cases have been filed in this county awaiting disposition by the Grand Jury. In district court this week a jury found Milford Hicks guilty of theft of property valued at more than $50 after a two hour deliberation, but Hicks got off with a 5 years suspended sentence. The jury was composed of Woodrow Dunlap, foreman; W. L. Cardwell, John Welch, Henry Freeman, Ganes Whittington, Walter Schu-elke, John Gabriel, Alvin Whitley, C. F. Purcell, J. L. McGlothlin, Edward F. Drumm, and Lee Wack-erhagen. Also in district court during the past few days, Henry Rodriguez received 2 years probation for assault with intent to murder with malice aforethought, and Manuel Magallanez drew a $450 fine and ourt costs for a similar offense. Robertson Leads Cheers For Junior High Team Kitty Robertson was elected head cheerleader for the junior high school recently, and her assistants will be Gwen Gvaef, Jackie Balven, and Candy McClain. These girls will lead cheers at the Midget football games. THINKING OUT LOUD Anti Rabies Campaign Starts A city-wide anti-rabies campaign will be initiated Saturday by the City of Lockhart in connection with the sanitary officer. Dr. J. G. Goodman, it was announced today. Dr. Goodman is giving a reduced rate for his services to get all dogs in the city vaccinated against rabies between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday in his office on the Bastrop highway, at $2. All dogs that run loose in the city must get city tags, and to get these tags persons must have the dog vaccinated. This effort is being made to get as many dogs vaccinated in one day as possible and help prevent a rabies epidemic should a dog become rabid. City officials say the police will clamp down in enforcing the dog tag ordinance. Fallout Should Be Lockhart People's Concern an Fallout begins 30 minutes after atomicc or H-bomb blast, according to Joe R. Humphrey, deputy state coordinator of civil defense and disaster, at the regular meeting of the Business Men's Club Thursday. What is fallout? It is the settling back to earth of soil that has been carried up into the air by an atomic blast and made radioactive. With Bergstrom AFB being a Strategic Air Command base, Austin and vicinity will undoubtedly be a prime target in case of an atomic war. With this in mind the people of this area should be prepared by having shelter and supplies of some kind available. In an attack of this kind not everyone will be killed. Many will be sick from burns, leukemia and other related diseases, according to Mr. Humphrey. A few more deformed babies will be born, but most babies will be relatively normal. Other than not being in the blast area, only one thing can be done to shield a person from a blast and that is to build a shield. At least inches concrete or three feet of earth between a person and the blast is needed. Most fallout occurs in 24 to 36 hours. However, considerable radiation continues for a period of about two weeks after the blasts. People can go outside their shelters for short periods during fallout, but the effects are accumulative. Mr. Humprey urged that people make a study of the possibilities of facilities that can be converted to shelters easily. Ross Andrews, county civil defense director, says Lockhart has a 200 bed emergency hospital, a dozen radios in cars and buildings and fire equipment in Lockhart and Luling and McMahan to help in case of emergencies. He said any- one who wants a copy of a pamphlet about how to build sht-ltcr may get one from him or from Judge Edgar Black. A resolutions committee of J. L. Buckley, Rev. Rod Kypke and Mrs. W. M. Schofield was named by President Arthur Hunke to prepare a suitable resolution about Tom Gambrell, one of the club's members. SCD Supervisor Election FOWier Mayor Called October 4 rt+pC On the first Tuesday of October UI6S OT OO 4) an election for Soil Con- Home Gets Power lelbourne Lancaster throws the switch which sent power lto the Golden Age Home Thursday. The switch wasf in le new LCRA sub-station.-Staff Photo. (Oct. .   _.. _________ servation District Supervisor for Zone 2 of each Soil Conservation District in Texas will be held. The election will be at a mass meeting held at an hour and place set by the supervisors of the local Soil Conservation District. Zone 2 of the Hays-Caldwell-Travis Soil Conservation District includes the following territory: That portion of Caldwell county bounded on the north by the MKT railroad, east by US. 183 and south and west by the San Marcos River. All persons who own land in Zone 2 and live in a county all or some part of which is in the district who have attained the age of 21 years are eligible to vote. Nominations are made from the floor and the person receiving a majority of the votes of the qualified voters present is selected for a term of five years. The present supervisor of the Hays-Caldwe1!. Travis Soil Conservation District is P. S. King, Lockhart. Supervisors serve without pay except for a small allowance for expenses. The supervisors constitute the administrative and policy forming body of the Soil Conservation District just as the school board members manage the school district. To be a district supervisor a person must be 21 years of age and a landowner in the zone from which he is elected. He should be practicing conservation on his own farm, be a leader in his area and be willing to spend sufficient time to fulfill the responsibilities of the office. Last Day to File Gas Tax Refunds Farmers who are entitled to get tax refunds are again reminded by R. L. Phinney, District Director at Austin, to file claim with the internal Revenue Service before September 33. Claims should be made on Form 2240 for 1980. These forms and instruction sheets can be obtained from county agents or Internal Revenue Service offices. Robert A. Beaty, 8S, former city commissioner of Lockhart, died at 3 p.m. September 25 at Lockhart Hospital and was buried in Lockhart Cemetery September 27. He had been ill for some time. Rev. R. P. Kypke conducted services from McCurdy Funeral Home. Survivors include four sisters, Mrs. Ennis Masur and Mrs. Keith Magee, and Mrs. Lee Booton of Lockhart; Mrs. Lill Brock of Austin; two brothers, J. M. Bcaty of New Braunfels and Clyde Bcaty of Lockhart. Born at Belmont February 24, 1875, he was a son of Lea and Mary Kidd Bcaty. He married Fannie Carter iu Lockhart June 10, 1906, was a member of Emmanuel Episcopal Church. He served on the city council as mayor in 1922-23, then for ti years as councilman, and again was elected to the council in 1940, serving until he retired in 1958. Pallbearers were N. B. Bozarth, Melbourne Lancaster, W. M. Cab-aniss, Sam Glosserman, Ross Royal, and C. J. Hankamer. Another Long Wins Presidency Throughout the week of September 19 the student body of Lockhart High School staged campaigns for fellow students running for Student Council offices. The week was climaxed by an assembly presented on Friday for the purpose of voting and electing the officers. Filling the 1960-61 offices will be Larry Long, a junior, as president; Linda Galloway, a senior, as vice-president; Linda McKean, a sophomore, as secretary; and Paul Williams, a sophomore, as treasurer. Congraualtions goes to all of these who will be the leaders in our school thi3 year. CALDWELL COUNTY has its share of criminal cases, and if I'm not mistaken more than its share of capital cases (those where the death penalty could be inflicted.) If I remember correclly, this county has given District Attorney Wallace Barber more to do than almost any county in his territory. And this, despite the fact that the county has a record of dealing harshly wiih capital cases. To handle parolees is a job that many people would not like nor would they take, bul Bill Chirk has that job for this part of the county, and he tells mc he has seven persons who report monthly to him as parolees. These persons arc about evenly divided between Anglo, Latin and Negro. Over the stale the parole staff has remained constant, while the number of parolees has increased. According to the Hoard of Pardons and Paroles, this increase has made an important contribution lo public safety because the parole system is directed toward prevention of crime. Before 1958 the Board couldn't give any assistance to inmates in developing release plans. So more and more men had to stay in the pen. So in 1958 the first professional parole supervision program began. Despite the sharp shift in the use of parole, the violation rate has not increased. 90 per cent of parolees under supervision at this time are gainfully employed and earning more than $10 million a year and supporting over 1,000 minor dependents. Parole is not forgiveness for an offense or clemency, but is a release procedure for selected inmates. Every inmate's case is reviewed for possible parole when he has served sufficient time to be legally eligible. The Parole Board studies the readiness for %e inmate for release, readiness of the community to accept the parolee, and the nature of the offense. A release plan which includes employment and satisfactory residence is studied, and parole is granted only when the Board is convinced the best interest of the public would be served. Parole officers are located in 20 offices scattered throughout the state and these officers work directly with such men as Mr. Clark to provide supervision for those (continued on buck page) Lion Band to Attend Band Day Activities Lions bandmen will take part in Band Day activities in Austin Saturday, beginning with a parade which starts at 10 a.m. and ending by being guests at the Texas-Tech football game that night, Band Director Newman Hood reports. The 80 piece Lion band will compete during the parade with other bands of the same school classification. From 2:30 to 4 p.m. the twirlers and drum majors will compete in a twirling contest, and winning persons will take part in halftime activities at the game, along with the four winning bands from the parade. With the arrival of four new uniforms the band will be able to field 80 pieces, rather than the 72 that has marched at previous football games. Frizzed Re-elected Thomas Frizzell was elected president of the senior class of Lockhart High School recently and James Farmer is vice-president. Other officers are Dorothy Schroeder, secretary; Benny HII-burn, treasurer; Tommy Moore, Jo Linda Risinger, Nancy Crouch, student council members. Saw Offensive Action Wayne Evans, Darrell Hess, and Charles age grades for their efforts. Evans is a tackle, Kraft logged some offensive time against Hess a center, and Kraft an end.-Staff San Marcos Friday and got better than aver-   Photos. Big Matador Line Holds Opponents Scoreless Seguin's Matadors, the team the experts have picked as co-favorites to win the 13AAA football crown, roll into Lockhart Friday night all rested for a crack at the Lions at 8 p. m. The Mats will be big favorites to hand Officers Arrest Three Burglars Two men and n woman are in custody in the Belton jail and Sheriff Desmond Reed has warrants for their arrest in connection with a burglary of the Conrad Ohlendorf home September 18, it has been reported. Those who have been charged with burglary by breaking in the case are Eva Ray Daniels, Jack Willard Daniels, and Elmer M. White, who were caught with the Roods. Over $000 in clothing, food and household goods was taken from the Ohlendorf home in a daring daylight burglary on the 18th. All but a few clothes and the meat were recovered in a home at Killccn, where the trio was captured Sunday following their burglary of a home in Bell county. Mr. and Mrs. Ohlendorf identified their be'ongings Monday. According to Mr. Ohlendorf, the trio was reported to have burglarized a home near Temple when the homeowner arrived, got the car license number and called officers, who made the arrest in Killeen. The trio were reported to be planning to leave the state soon to open a used clothing store. The activities of the three was estimated as six months. Ag Committees Plan For Year's Programs Three subcommittees of the Caldwell County agricultural planning committee met recently prior to the meeting of the committee slated for October, Steve Lindsey, county agent, reports. The cotton cpmmittec met last Tuesday in the First-Lockhart National Bank in an all day meeting with Glenn Black, associate cotton specialist of the Extension Service. Edgar Lippe was named chairman for this group. The vegetable subcommittee met at the Luling Foundation Thursday morning with Clyde Singleton makes p!r>ns, and the pecan sub committee elected Marlin Harris their chairman at a meeting on Tii'trsday afternoon at Lockhart State Bank. County Agent Lindsey met with all three groups.    , Wynn to Head TB Seal Sale the Lions another loss. Seguin hasn't been pressed in blasting Floresville 136-0 and Luling 42-0, led by the running of halfback Harvey Kutac and quarterback Robert Kramer and the solid line led by the two tackles, 212 pound Gary    Staulzenberger   and   198 pound Dennis Jackson. The Matadors big, experienced line, most of whom return from the team that blanked Lockhart 28-0 last year, averages 186 pounds offensively, and has made the wing T of Coach J. M. Pechal go very well. Quarterback Kramer, a 1G0 pounder, likes to call the roll-out as well as running power. The Lions will rely on a starting lineup which has been improving, and should they be able to get their passing game going may be able to open up the Matadors. Quarterback Tommy Moore-and halfbacks Gabriel Sanchez and Johnny Fulps will all throw the ball occasionally, and last; week's San Marcos game gave an indication that their passing might do some damage, if the receivers can hold on. The Lions will be considerably lighter than the Matadors with Earl Feathcrston (160) and Char. Ies Kraft (157; or Larry Mueller (151) at ends, Keith Koehler (192) and Don Penrod (180) or Lawrence Flippo (160) at tackles, Brooks Corley (165) and Gilbrt Perez (143) at guards, Jim Ham-blin (145), center. Quarterback Tommy Moore is a 172 pounder, fullback Hank Fielder is 170, San-chez weighs 125 and Fulps 150. The Matadors starting lineup will be Harry Engelke (175) and Don Cunningham (190), ends; Stuatzenberger and Jackson at tackles, Juan Medina (165) and Jon Nelson (193), guards; Jesse Hoermann (170), center; Krameh (160), quarterback; Jimmy Sagee-biel (180), fullback; Kutac <160) and Donald Schubert (145) halfbacks. Lockhart's last victory over Seguin came in 1958 by a 14-0 count. Their record to date shows losses of 34-6 to Columbus, 52-6 to Taylor, and 16-8 to San Marcos, and a 12-12 tie with New Braunfels. Both San Marcos and New Braunfels are in the same district as Seguin and all three are old rivals of the Lions. A Lion victory would be a big upset, but it might not be entirely out of the range of possibility, for it took three long runs last year in the second half for the Matadors to down the underdog Lions. But they may have to go wide and high to do it. Dr. James Wynn has been named chairman of the Caldwell County Tuberculosis Seal Sale this winter, Sam Glosserman, board member, announces. The seal sale begins in November and most of the money goes for research and for rehabilitation of persons known to have tuberculosis. Tax Payment Now Saves You Money Payment of city taxes to get a discount must be made by the end of September, Pat Kelly, city secretary, reports. The three per cent discount can help the taxpayer save money and by paying now the city is helped also. From October I to February 1 no discount is given, and after February I taxes will be delinquent and a penalty will be assessed. Explorer Post May Be Organized Here An Explorer Post for boys 14 or older and in the ninth grade or higher will' be available in the near future, Richard Bentley, director of Exploring from Austin, reports. Boys interested in having the program explained to them should be at the First Lockhart National Bank Wednesday, October 5 at 7;30 p. m., at which time a movie, "This is Exploring", will be shown. Collision Costs Man $200 Fine Tuesday $600 damage was incurred in a two car collision 1.4 miles south of McMahan on FM 86 Tuesday morning, when cars driven by Marlin Harris and Raymundo Rangel Jr. sideswiped each other as they drove in opposite directions, Patrolman Nolen Crow reports. But Rangel was hit another blow as he was fined $200 and costs for failure to stop and give information. No one was hurt physically. Burglars at Work Take Money, Tobacco Juniors Win The junior class at Lockhart presented a skit in behalf of Larry Long for student council president. Tommy Kirk-patrick, center, shows Glen Havel who wears the pants in the family.--Staff Photo. Three burglaries and a wreck over the weekend were reported by officers this week. A two-car collision occurred on Saturday afternoon about 2:45 p.m. at the intersection of Pecan and US 183, sending two men to Lockhart Hospital; neither of the men were seriously injured, but one car, was heavily damaged. The accident took place when a car driven Sblith on 183 by Natividad Torres or Confreras went into a spin on the slick road in the rain and hit sideways into a car driven North by Louis Crouch on 183. The Torres car then hit the rear of the Grouch vehicle and came to a stop facing North on Crouch's side of the road. Torres ' was thrown from the car and suffered a severe gash in his leg. Both he and Mr. Crouch went to the hospital,' but were released after treatment. Two burglaries were reported Monday morning when Gus Ger-mer and Martin Martinez opened for business at Maxwell. The,Ger-mer store was entered through the back door, and the burglars took 2 cartons of cigarettes, 4 boxes. of cigars, 2 boxes of candy and 2 cartons of^chewing ^ac^9.*The Martinez beer parlofei��If"entW�d through a side door whicb is not used and 2 1-2 cases of beer.and -$20 cash were taken. - , At Martindale Thursday night the Caldwell County Telephone Co. was burglarized of $22.50,'but extensive damage was created' in fireproof files which Were torn open with a crowbar. The same night JVC. Carnes insurance was burglarized, but apparently the burglars were looking for money .only, as nothing was. reported,.,** missing.   

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