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   Valley Morning Star (Newspaper) - November 10, 1970, Harlingen, Texas                               cannot legislate the hnman race into -C. H. Parkhurst VALLEY MORNING o 0 I OH Your Frettdom H O OOHCO o No. 133 lOc Daily 15c Sunday November 1970 Copyright 14 Pages Kent President Attacks Grand Jury Report WASHINGTON president of Kent State Univer-l sity said Monday a special'. grand jury report on the of four students there threatens academic freedom on every major American college pus. Robert I. White- made the charges in his first public statement on the County grand jury's' decision Oct. 1G to indict persons and virtually National Guardsmen of for the tragedy last my the grand jury report was disregarded clear if pursued in all its would eventually de- stroy not only Kent State but all major universities in Ameri- White said. The university president spe- cifically took exception to the grand jury's finding that Kent .'State officials were 'responsible for the slayings 'because they allegedly followed a policy of general permissive-1 failed to control elements and over-emphasized1 i the right In dissent. hold no brief for lawbreakers or for White sail neither is academic community s where matter how to be sup- j White acknowledged that administration could be for same of its past actons. the directions of findings trans- cends the Kent State he said. charges are applicable to ail higher education. In the constitu- tional safeguards of American democracy are themselves un- der Russia Will Free Generals -V Vr -A- -cV -V .-r i- i-T j-T w' n Court Won't Rule On Wan Legality Dissenters Give Written Opinion WASHINGTON The Supreme Court refused Monday to rule on the Massachucett's legislature's effort to have the Vietnam War declared unconstitutional and to bar the Defense Department from sending state residents there to fight. By a 6-3 the court refused to hear Massachusetts' deliberate test case on the' Nixon Thinks Vietnam Not A11 Issue test case on legality of the war. Its brief order gave no but' Justice William 0. of the three issued a written opinion arguing the court should have accepted the case and subsequently ruled on it. HUNGER LOOMS A South Vietna- mese woman Monday tries to dry rice soaked by floodwaters laM week by .south of Quarig 'Ngoi. -The area along the highway which parallels South Vietnam's coast was hardest hit by the ond hunger looms where the rice a aged. does not concern the wisdom of fighting in Southeast Douglas wrote of Massa- jchusetts' new law. KEY BISCAYNE. Fla. i no question of whether the Nixon is confident J conflict is either just on his Vietnamization policy will is present. have eliminated thj Indochina 1 as a domestic political asked instead election a i said as a domestic instead f f orc exccujive Housc a congressional Farm Bureau Chief Raps Nixon For 'Closing Door FORT Tex. Farmers must join politically against President .Nixon and other politicians on a more political nad in rrrust past. band together the on agrioil- politically if need be to strength- agricultural i are the absent declaration of to commit Massachusetts citizens in armed hostilities on foreign soil. Another way of putting the question is whether under our Constitution presidential wdl de. t and are permissible. a proWem Justices Potter Stewart andlStatcs John M. Harlan joined Douglas i in voung that the court Ziegler talked to newsmen The Texs.s farm leader hear arguments en thc legisla-1 Key Biscayne while Nixon uire's. action April 2 holding winding up a weekend of sun.1 J that the war was illegal on fishing and Tolitics on Grand Secretary Ronald L. Ziegler said Nixon believes policies will work and that to 1972 thc tnainese situation will be a problem to the it has for the past six Solon Says Men Released Now WASHINGTON Russia told the United States Mon- day that it would release two Americans generals it has held for almost three the State Department reported. The State Department announced the Soviet decision after Rep. Kenneth had told reporters that he understood from high-level State Depart- Negotiators Spend Night In Auto Talks ment sources that the generals already had been released. The Americans to be released are Maj. Gen. Edward and Bng. Gen. Claude McQuar- DETROIT tors for the United Press Officer Robert McClos- key said at p.m. cannot confirm that they have departed. When we have additional information we will Ket Jt yoy Auto that the two generals GENERAL McQUARKIE GENERAL SCHERRER ture. the president of the Texas President pro-'. consideration in a Senate com- Farm Bureau said Monday. us nis campaign mitee for office that he would Tnat blil dld have chuscits Sidney in an address to White House door of an.v farm organiza- i Supreme Nixon had the when he sunnortcd ar to sign the House's Poage-Hard- grounds Congress never .-de- Cay in rhe a SAJGOX in Farm which is now under clared More Americans Die In Indochina Xew York industrialist H. Robert Abplan- Unoei Uiat Massa- alp. lusctls went directly to the ri- Court asking that Workers and General Motors i would be freed was 'conveyed to Corp. spent Monday night i Secretary of State William P. trying to end the 56-tiay-old i Rogers early Monday afternoon UAW 'strike. The in a. telephone call from Soviet bargaining session was expect-1 Ambassador Anatoly F. Dobry- ed to produce a run. settlement Tuesday. At Key wjiera The negotiators spent the j President Nixon is night working out details and-Press Secretary Ronald Zieglw language of a reported GMJsaid Dobrynin also told the proposal which would cost the White House of Russia's company well over decision to release the officers. over three years in wages'Ziegler said Nixon it alone. i a constructive step in United States-Soviet 1 he union s ruling International Executive The their pilot arid to arrive in Detroit a Turkish liaison officer had 'Tuesday. jbeen held by the Soviets at a L'oth Division night Lenmakan in Soviet Armenia about 35 miles northwest Marathon negotiations Oct. 21 when their plane wounded al least 13 others and of and the other news blackout imposed landed inside the Russian shot down the helicopter American wounded was hurt in talks Oct. 30 are The United States said i of the Indochina war helicopter crash -45 traditional signs that agree- strong winds blew it off course. _____ t........ i dunng a brief upsurge in'southwest of the South is at haiKi. subject McCloskey said the pilot of the 900-delegate said farmers but I ask vou. has Defense Secretary R. fighting inwlving U.S. troops spokesman said ratification by the union's the light plane. Army Maj. the state-Aide organization must ikept his i is for Laird be enjoined from assign- arrived back at Key Biscaynci Vietnam South Vietnamese troops re-i 375.000 members at GM. P. Russell Jr. was still nn i i incr -am' sr-hncoMc 1 t22 n.TTl. KST nV _ i holH hlS nfj The 25-member IEB 'said 'he had no same old hunk of ban that i ing any Massachusetts draftees politicians .and public or military men to Vietnam. La Casifa Manager Talks On Evil' Boycotts FORT Tex. injunction against the union. seekers feed us just prior to he said. fall for j this but we survive More than 1.500 oersons are Roben H. Quinn to discussing p.m. EST by helicopter. The President plans to spend i In Communist the rest of the week at forces launched a series of Despite the court s refusal Florida White working coordinated attacks casualties of only their own wounded in hear the the legislature's'On the budget he will send military in January- and and towns northeast of the separate engagements in the attending the five-day conven which began Sunday. issue in lowr courts and it is Turn To NIXON. Page. 2 The general manager of thc firm complex which has been proving 27 arts of violent has Delegates were a i thal. Supreme Court heavy workload dunng the to hear the trict caucascs and on Io'vcr consumer ers Monday called 1 boycottes a but one which is effective i and will likelv continue. resolutions committee was ting through 970 The Massachusetts law I which delesates mains begin voting on Tuesday. Rochester said the union shift-' d gears and launched the as a means of making the Ray vice president themselves organize their and general manager of workers. The boycott focused oni sita Farms Inc. of Rio Grande j grapes and was carried out Cilv in the Lower Grande during.a speech t o Jhf 37th annual convention of the Texas Farm Bureau. Ij Casita Farms vrerc chosen hi and 1967 as targets for He that only two of 450 persons working on the farm at hmc wanted join thf unkm. farms obtained a court MAFFOTT re-i least to the extent that no court knocked it it con- j flicls with federal selective service law which permits I young men to be drafted into1 the Army and ordered to go where their superiors want them. Bir. Col. Paul Feer.ey. head of' the Massachusetts Selective rifM in u-nri- a Service said iho icxas has the right to somc overhcad decision Monday would trical wires. have no more out that does not. Two Brownsville Men Electrocuted i CORPUS CHRISTI. Tex. j young Brownsville men were electrocuted Mondav a Nice Day For Doing Nothing Today be a fine dav Penh while a Allied task force sought unsucce.ssful- ly lo make contact with Viet Cong forces south of the capital. Initial reports indicated Cam- bodian casualties were and military spokesmen said Cambodian troops in the area requested reinforcements and more ammunition. and the Mekong Delta. Olher saidu Russell rmsht Veterans Day is Holiday For Postman worked out UK pilot the then turns over to the union's Motors which already I has been told to meet in Detroit Wednesday. The i council in turn i acceptance or rejection of agreement by the membership.' While details of the latest GMj proposal were not undoubtedly represents a be The postofficcs of the will observe Wednesday The Communist attack cen- as a tered along Highway 7 which Uarlingrn Postmaster Mike Turn To GENKRALS. Page 2 Reds Also Free Turkish Colonel and on his f o r tnristas. for anlumn- garricning and for planting a tree. It also will be a good day to go fishing or just to -aijoy the sunshine. It will be loo nice a day go lo work. but joo'd belter go. anyway. uilb mild tcmprraiures today and cool initial demands ana tfte compa- Turkev ny's latest prestnke offer. The Soviet Union Monday would cost released a Turkish colonel in wages alone detained since OKI. 21 with provincial capital of Kompong Hc there will be no city j Anicrican when 50 miles to the or rural deliver.' of Fighting leads from Phrom Penh to ihe Gilbert said Monday. CaMomw have been than tjirrc's ro iw he said. such a Rocfiester It forces farmers lo organ- ize workers. The people dn TXK care to be oreaniTeV she Police said the two men were said. one has from cicht 16 milts PiiK load a box car when thc the Selective on the that's the acddcnl occurred. bans of this picture for today. 50 miles to the or rural deliver. northeast. Fighting was also nor the service' reported within Kompong windows of the main office be'. Cham. open. Mail will be placed inl The two Americans post office lock he members of the 25th Infantry and special delivery mail will were ambushed less be delivered. nee most of ihe community will be open for Business sufficient postal personnel will be on hand an action. handle nuigninc he i An01 her 31 Americans were said. And collection sen-ire will wounded when Commune is be on regular schedule. Van Wyk Will Top Ballot aiso said bnycrti was a in that rt was not dirrdly cd at consurrKT was not The ro Ictxncc as tvbelbci lo hoy crapes because 'TWTC off Jhc arc nol i.V consumin cJwncc Jo shelves vhcrros ESCALATOR TO THE STARS' Texas Textbooks Encourage 'Disrespect By Youth' AUSTIN. Tex. Jh attcmpi Jo modrmire Texas tort- books. ilw Sliic Board of Edu- receni crili- Jo a new of 12R JCKIS X5onday. i mil from thc lens for fmm and Tex riaoncWy protest- ed snduMon of im-o world his- ton- tyvita 371 ibc kc. Mrs. .V of Ihr bwfa bil Man pro and nnfrt JOT She do icll pood about and lo prwxie hislory. Chirks X. Rairr of a rtion from a tewever. wtK'n s-hc cwnplsintcd the Jcvt Monroe DortniK1 a dirty Smnh of thc Rxi wn shirk jt's Yankee impcr- Other board membors agreed with of ihe crittasm of Uw book and James H. of a molion 1o j-lr.ko Jhe humors' ten. ttx- board volc-d 165 5o keep cm the 'old ihr hosrd thai pub- lishers of ihe were lo make in Jsne olhc-r ap-. Wally Van U'vk drew on she balks for ttx S Harimscn maws and City Dec their plane landed in Russian j territory. I Col. Ccvat Denli was handed lover to Turkish authorities at ithe Soviet-Turkish border town of Kirjlcak Monday nighL iTurkish military authorities jlook iV-nli by rar across the 'border and said he would fly to I Ankara when bad weather conditions in Ibc area im- proved 1 Newsmen not allowed to interview Denli or lake turej. srx1 three Sam cht ts 21 according Dowih to in in Anneiiia. GVn AHyn ihey The cigW icxts drew rmi- Uwly. One book ui rn- ttn- CoCTiniisSWWT J. S. Ameri- Edgar. in bonks for an. ijtfi in oe and 127 rc- The was heM in 1he jdty room JTI hail MfrxJay. the oommiss'xioor's race Akxilt drew place on ihe rommiswrxr Bill jwrod and A.i H. third The iVc. S hjilkn will conlsin Jo or no on a city charier amcn'dment Inde Hem M to JnmWrti per ccrrt of llhe of.-vi room. c for Uyi owioarirs QvrMMm Rut 11 9   

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