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Valley Morning Star Newspaper Archive: February 28, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Valley Morning Star

Location: Harlingen, Texas

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   Valley Morning Star (Newspaper) - February 28, 1943, Harlingen, Texas                               Two Complete Wire Services Appear In The Star Daily AP and UP VALLEY MORNING ST FINAL EDITION TEN CENTS Full Leased Wire of the Associated Press FEBRUARY 1943 Complete United Press Service Thirty-two Pages Today Non-Stop Allied Aerial Attacks Level German Center At Other Nazi Positions Blasted Allied Forces Rolling Axis Back In Heavy Fighting In Kasserine Areas German Tanks Make Slight Headway In Thrust At Line IT LACES Star Hay ward demon- strates what she calls the wind bathing suit at fNew As Susan well it laces up the .-side. faxes Still Are Problem Solons Sidestepping Deferment Proposals Appar- nor'h front with more than men End 50 front dispatches Qntly stymied on the problem'of in an effort to penetrate or envelop the vital Pont De Fahs part of a tax year should I potential jumping off place for the final drive on-Tunis. __ ILIIIWUIU T1_- _ l__ J U 4.Uk.mirrli 4- nnl Donets Basin Air Raids Nearing Battle Rages iGrand Scale Plan Nazis Removing Bulk Of Battered Forces To Remote Bases Near Mediterranean Coast Now ALLIED North were reported to have made slight headway in new thrusts sgamsl the British lines before Tunis but Anglo-American forces still were rolling back the chastened enemy in the Kasserine area. Unofficial reports said the iown of Kasserine had fallen to the Allies i as the blasted out of the Pass to the began removing I the bulk of their battered forces to remote bases to the south and near the Mediterranean coast. A BBC broadcast said Kasserine had been occupied and that the Germans also were evacuating Feriana to the southwest. The British broadcast added that was expected to be abandoned by the withdrawing enemy. At 7 the Gentians attacked six scattered points on the the House ways arid Bieins sub-committee considering pay-as-you-go proposals decided Saturday to let this issue simmer while turned to consider- the withholding Sjhase. Chairman Cooper an- nounced after a long Saturday jcs- j mel has been making along the that the group would seek to Tunisian front for several weeks. featU'e1 Heav-v losses lndudln.B seven The Treasury Department has I tanks and many casualties were By they had broken through at three points for a slight but the situation was not regarded ss alarming and military reports emphasized the enemy thrusts were little stronger than the jabs which Marshal Erwin Horn- Q I has ggested a withholding levy of around 19 per cent against taxable Income .by which semi- monthly or monthly deductions would be made from pay envelopes tnd salary checks. This would not an additional but with- would be applied against tail's be computed at the year tad. I the proposal by I chairman of the' leral Reserve Bank of New1 After Peace for by-passing one jez-Ei-Bab with an infantry lut VJMtome tax year to facilitate thej through the hills to a current west toward the road junc- appeared be shaping up j itoii _a- party supported pnnci LdinrdemocratV PP leading democrats. T The lull ways and means com- IBittee turned down the Ruml i push by Italian Plan on a strict party j anfl German troops afainst Mon- jMpublicans for and ID Democrats seur Hiu ln tne area south of Bou jilainst. The committee also re-1 ftcted other pending current pny- tent proposals and turned Vatican City Silent On Sudden Activity Switzerland The German Ambassador to Vat. can City departed hurriedly and unex- 1 pectedly for Berlin Saturday and Count Galeazzo Ciano's pres- j cntation of credentials as Italian Ambassador to the Holy See was postponed until Monday. j Well-informed Vatican ofaserv- ers were quick to see in these moves a further indication of the tanhs wide scope of negotlauons of German way since the arrival of Archbishop offshoot drive from Spellman of New inflicted on the Axis in the early stages of the fighting and the Allies seized 420 prisoners. The six German attacks were routed as along the Tabarca-Mateur road to Djebel Abiad with 700 enemy troops a stronger drive down the Matcur-Beja road with about SO tanks and a bat- talion of against the Allied-held hill southwest of Med- ALGERIA .Reds Battering Toward Dnieper River Dunkerque Shipping And Docks Hard Hit By Heavy Allied Cologne Is Hammered Flying Fortresses and striking rs_ Red for the second straight day at Adolf Hitler's European bombed battered its way slowly Brest Saturday in a non-stop Allied air offensive that was mounting Orel and the Dnieper Saturday. scaie proportions. cppturmg several villages on tne I At the same time British fliers in American Ventura light boggy but to the southeast j covercd 'by United Royal Air Dominion and Allied fight- it was engaged in a violent blasted Dunkorque. touching off giant explosions along tht docki fensivc battle on which the fau amidst German shipping in the harbor. the Dcncts depended. j A few earlier hundreds of big British tx.mbens droppwt For the first time Moscow dis- iremendous of super-blockbusters and hundreds of patches acknowledged that the Rus-1 of incendiaries Cologne in the biggest rsid on third sians had the initiative in tne city since 1.000 pi iiies struck at it last May. vital Kramatorsk-KrasnoarmeisKoyei All the Fortresses and Liberators returned safely from the bombing area ot the Donets Basin The I of key Gejman naval and submarine base at the tip of the Brit- Germans wire reported thro tany Peninsula en the French coast. Seven were lost in Friday's raid nassive air and inlantry forces into ceaseless with many positions repeatedlj' chang- ing hands. German still lacking Soviet told of pow- erful and widespread Russian at- tacks on the cer.tral where it appeared that the Red army had on Wilhelmshaven. the third American attack on German soil. Three Royal Air Force and Allied fighters which escorted Americans on the Brest sortie were1-------------------------------------------- missing. The Fortresses and Liber- ators concentrated the main weight of their great bomb loads on har- bor installations. Two German fighters were de- stroyed in dogfights over the Dun- launched a gtneral offensive after kerque the Air Ministry an- spring thaws and intensified both by fighters resistance had slowed down opera- i accompanying the Venturas. One lions in the south. i Canadian plane was missing. Villages Arc Occupied lri an all-day parade across the The Saturday noon communique Channel British Whirlwinds escort- RETREATING AXIS and Am- erican forces continued their hammering of Marshal Rommel's driving them back toward the spa after recapturing Kasserine Pass and the high ground on both sides. They also advanced 10 to 15 miles in the Sbiba area to the northeast. French troops ad- vancing from the mountains on the west side of Ous- seltia Valley smashed one after another Axis positions in that area. Meanwhile in the the British Eighth Army was reported to have penetrated the outer defenses of the Mareth Line. ofsoo drve rom av-o in an effort to outflank lFrancis the over to the sub-committee. War Labor Board Is Called Weak Kneed that the Labor Board was In. ita efforts to settle a wage dis- pute at the Boeing Aircraft Com- Field dispatches said the first at- tack made slight penetration into a no-man's the second and third were frustrated and only in the i and Bou Arada areas did the Germans achieve important gains. If the Germans reached Beja and held they would isolate the British at Menjez-El- Bab except for one but indications Saturday night were were made Saturday by Kar-1 tnat tney were going to have to old J. local AFL ma-jjjght vigorously for every addi- union who also jnch. dieted that of Military spokesmen said the at- ployes would attend a 24-hour tacks apparently had been planned meeting Monday instead of work- j originally as a holding action to be ing. that the WLB nad dis- said consideratibn of the 'Aite until Gibson War Labor Board knows how -n-e feel. We've done our duty by IjoinR back to work and keeping up production. But if the WLB has to'be so weak-kneed as to take off instead of doing its' it's all right with Munda.Most Heavily JJombed Pacific Base WASHINGTON base i launched after Rommel broke through the Allied positions around Thala north of Kasserine Pass. When he failed to do the north- ern sector push was started in hopes that the British lines there had be'en drained to reinforce the Thala area. Japanese Retreat Further In Fighting Near Salamua Enemy Hurled Bock In Vicinity of Wau And Leaving Number Of Dead After Battle for consultation with Pope Pius XII. Yet all that came from Vatican City was a declaration that continues to retain the greatest re- Foreign diplomatic observers were convinced the delay in Count Ciano's appearance scheduled for Saturday and the departure of the j German envoy were connected with i ALLIED HEADQUARTERS In renewed gn an address on peace hopes and a.ms fighting on the approaches to New the Japanese Ciano had planned to deliver the Pope. The best judgment from Moscow reported occupa- tion of several villages north of whore the Soviets were eagmg up along the outer approach- es of stronghold linking the central and southern fronts. advancing some of whom were reported using Ameri- can and British made round- ed up great stoics of booty. In the but of- fensive far west of Soviot assault forces overrode German re- stor led an unidentified and captured it after a short but violent battle. The communique was short an ed by Spitfires bombed German air fields in the Maupertuis area of France. All planes returned. From the Allied air pattern of the last three be- lievert the offensive had the. double-barreled aim of clearing the seas of U-boats and the skies of German planes. is like the battle 01 BHain in one observer com- mented.' Germans tried to knock out the Royal Air Force and British The thunderbolt raid on industrial capital of the information from the Donets Basin.' with two and four-ton bombs caused where the gravest'Nazi threat to widespread havocjmd_kindledjiun- the Soviet arisen since the Red army struck but wiping out the German-dcfenses on November 19. Nazis Counter Attack I Reinforced German troops made I _ several counter-attacks in a hat th' v. hich were described as only mod crate. Tne near-record bombardment of attempt to break into a big town tative British Press Association soutnwest of but were called most devastating and repulsed each time and lost more than 300 the high command In another sector Soviet artyiery destroyed 14 German tanks and in- flicted considerable losses on mo- torized infantry following up an armored thrust. intensified bombing yet _-jrmans on tre con- The nun-slop Allied .ve which night continued In full All day River Water Protest Set Meeting Set Thursday At Weslaco City Hall EDINBURG The running ot El Paso Valley into the Rio Grande is expected to be protested meeting of Lower Rio Grande Valley Water Conservation Association to be held at 3 p. m. Thursday at the Wes- laco City Hall at which the present low water crisis also will be dis- according to Oliver C. Al- president. A recent decision of a civil apJ petls court practically nullified all thfi strutim pollution laws on' sht'.-.te it was and img.jtion drainage waters with'a b'.nh concentration of salu are be- Grande.' River water is already heavily im- pregnated with salts at of low tlow the condition ii re- rapidly getting worse. No -a gets into the river in any tities until the Mexican tributaries come in. The Pecos River water also Is but the Devil's River js better. These American do not provide sufficient dilution. The El .fardin irrigation district in the greatly con- planes raced act as- Channel over the low river. The to blast targets irr France. iRio Grande has been going down at' Perfectly perfectly timed the rate of a foot a week and Man- ailO a.ms inc Udpmiese Iiovc itc before retreated further in the vicinity of Wau and Mubo. leaving a number Nazis to- wjde I of the All.ed high command announced Saturday. cln 8nd northwestern the Last month the Japs were crushed an attempt to destroy an wide open all repair work on industrial in which the s had been engaged since the J.UG Ufit judgment oatUluaV I LjctSL JIIUUUI Hie t-iUOJICU jr em cULeulfJL _u elll Ka iidtu iiau ucv.lv night among Vatican observers was1 Allied airdrome at wh.ch is 33 miles southwest of tenocked series 01 oiooay i.ooo-plane asssult. that Archbishop Spellman's visit .northeast New Guinea coastal city. Harrjmg Allied patrols then forced e The pilot of a Halifax bomber somehow was connected with the j the Japs into a retreat towaid some 12 miles below Salamaua. koye peace hopes of some factions in j The Japs lost more than dead in skirmishes and patrol activities. and Balkan nation allied to the there has been no definite reports of ground but Sextet To Be professed to Allied planes in the area have engaged in hours of bombing and strafing. I TT iv I reported that at beginning of searchlight's formed a over but at Axis. Yet none here know whether there was any offi-' cial support for these hopes in any of the Axis nations. Mohondis K. Gandhi Is Not So Cheerful BOMBAY A British gov- Aerial activity was on a considerably reduced being concen- in New Guinea. At above Salamua on the Huon Hidalgo County May Issue Books I a jmedium bombers started fires and silenced machmegun positions. On Church Program HARLINGEN Special music by a Weslaco high school sextet will feature the family night supper at the First Methodist chuich at 6 The communique reported thatjp_ m according to the n a roundup of stragglers in the pastor. Dr. George C. Baker Jr. EDINBURG Although only what apathetic and not quite ongmaly. a total of but reported little other most heavily b.ombed enemy in the has been sub- jected to the 77th attack in three seizure by the Allies was almost months by American the inevitable since his rash announced Saturday. ''.The almost daily pounding of Munda and satellite base on nearby Koloombangara Island has had military quarters said its bid to break through to the north having flared moved back into the hills of Eastern Tunisia and ID the p'am before Faid led some observers here to believe i where he launched his costly gamble that the Americans are preparing last week. lor nw advances in the Solomons. The Weather TOR THE Warmer Sunday. TUB High tide at 1 05 p.m. Low Jfkfe e m. W RIVER No material change In 24 to 30 houiv SUNRISE a.m. 8UNSET 7 31 p.m. First indicate highest tempera- SMurdaj. second loueH tempera- ture during iaM 24 houis. rain jnelted snou dm.nit last 12 hours CWT. Saturday. N. M........ 62 28 Texai ..........51 23 On...............41 BROWNSVILLE ............69 55 III...............5.J '14 Corpus This trend indicated that Rom- mel was digging in seriously for the Eighth Army's offensive. The German perhaps significant- said Saturday that the Eighth Army is probing for the best spot to attack the Mareth which now is believed much weaker than it was before the Italian Armistice Commission hauled down its guns. change in the fasting Indian lead- er's condition. Chauravarthi Eajagopalachari. 000 No. 2 ration.ng books are ex- pected to be issued in Hidalgo The new attacks were described J as phase of Rommel's drive for positional strength against the in- creasing Allied threat from all particularly from the south where the British Eighth Army was believed about ready for a powerful onslaught. Although there was no official confirmation that Kasserine town area of Allied-held well be- Japs Members of tne sextet are Miss- es Jane Irene Jean low Lae-Salamua. 660 Japs have JoncSi Tommy Gene 120Jbeen killed and 73 taken prisoner Rlves and Frances Belts. Soldiers during February. During the con- and tourists will be guests and pa on church members will bring extra Buna is the Aus- 'covered dishes for the visitors. Oliver C. Aldrich of Ed-itrahans and Americans dispersed' Moulton Cobb will address the day he will get OPA Is To Prosecute Meat Price Violators chairman of the Hidalgo ior destroyed a Jap army of forum at p. organized resistance in Papua evening worship begins the attack huge cone one stage the glare of the Incen- diaries was so bright that the searchlights were dimmed. Anti-aircraft fire from this hard- est hit of German cities never was on Pa.ie Column Registered For War Book No. 2 HARLINGEN Approximately more Harlingen people regis- tered for War Ration Book No. 2 nil. J.11W1C111 COfl All J visited Gandhi at Poona Fri-j County War Price and Rationing A1' organized and afterward Board Saturday j but ..am oatuiaay. Iceded that many groups of poorly _ _. j 11 j There has been a big rush to supplied Japs .still vere roaming ATB rifled Under gel No. 1 books because the No. 2 the books cannot be obtained without Aldrich told the Star. Several Mexican Mission To thousand persons have yet to ge' SAN FRANCISCO The J book No. 1. Regular than were registered last year for at 7.301 a preliminary checkup by I TT Liquor Law Charges E. H. superintendent of JKarhngen schools revealed Satur- Total registration was an- Inounced as 17.237. j Poteet reported that this number i represented 5.640 far-'ly units and r Visit North Africa ____ can be pamped there. Hunter said that he had written the Willacy county pointing out the situation and requesting that it cease pumping for a time. Hunter said that the Willacy dis- trict permit was only for flood wai- ters and that it was not supposed to pump when the regular flow ot tha river is being used by districti with prior permiti. U. S. Officials To Be On Radio On Sunday HARLINGEN President Frank- lin D. General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Admiral C. W. Ntmitz will all be on the sama radio program at p. m. Sun- day. General Allied com- mander in. chief in North will broadcast from headquarteri Admiral commander m chief of the Pacific will speak from somewhere in the Pa- cific battle area. All will speak in IhA interests of the American Red Cross War Fund Campaign which opens Monday. The network not named. Office of Price Administratioft Sat- There was a rush at all points urday night announced it expects where to prosecute 400 Pacific Coast meat'lam dealers for violations of price ceil- ings. The announcement was after State OPA Director Francis Carroll charged that troop trans- ports destined for Pacific battle BROWNSVILLE Louis about 150 books remained on owner of the Barreda when the registration period Package and John ended. A total of excess Negro waiter at Miller's Girll at were for which stamps'. MEXICO CITlf A Mex- were fined in the removed and 53.586 coffee Match U. S. OlltOUt hnnks iNazi Experts Seek To chil- ac- drich was told. North Africa sometime next ing sold liquor on Sunday and was counted for the large number. Ten have called 150 of _ ______ _____i.j f npri SlOft rillls nf I -_ a STOCKHOLM The Nazi minister of Prof. Albert was reported Saturday to Applications'are being made for j authoritative sources revealed here pl_as the first time for men who I Saturday. Seigler of liquor zones have been delayed for as j have been discharged from the arm- id thal the mis. pe. He also was f red 00 much as five days at a time because led services and soldiers Jiving headod bv Gen Salvador S. and costs they could not get meat for sol-iposU who did not need book No I the presidential Both charges were filed bv Wil- JO plus costs of coffee stamps were removed for nomic experts to discuss nf r was charged with each child under 14 years of age. matching the flood of war ma r in a wet area without a The entire registration program I terials beinp t.imorf .u. diers. until they applied for book Ko. 2. seneral go to the A1. in wih Popular Spring Chapeaux In Detroit To Be Minus And Veils lied headquarters in North Africa Texas Liquor Control Board to observe operations in that the ater first-hand. registration program was carried out without and the people of Harlingen co- operated helping to keep down as much unnecessary work as pos- Poteet said. 55 .30 61 60 .54 .61 Colo Iowa....... c Kan......_. Fort Texas....... Fla........ Kansas Mo......... Laredo. Texas............ New Orleans. La.......... Sew K. Y......... Jlorth Nebr....... okla..... LouK Mo.......... Sun D c..... NOTE' Amounts ol precipitation less than 010 incn not oublisncd except foi Brownsville 20 25 27 34 35 31 55 38 26 28 23 38 22 DETROIT Spring the popular in Detroit this year will be minus ribbons and veils. The city's wai' working gals want utility and safety over g'.amor. Women war of them at the Ford Motor Com- pany's Highland Park are indulging in a hat and uniform deesigning contest. So they there is nothing on the mar- ket in the line of attractive pro- tective headgear. It seems to them that top notch milliners have been designing smart but impractical hates. get their hair caught in the machinery for lack of pro- tective Molly Eisen- chairman of the woman's division United Automobile Work- ers local said Satur- day. hat must not have any or re it must be attrac- for after all we're only about the best to torn up are not favored by many because they are too says Molly. if the turban is the wind up she the ends may loosen and catch in a ma- chine One idea was that of a helmet type properly ventilated and made of light weight material with a dash of color. The contest grew out of a style- show meeting of representative factory workers and called by Molly to find out what the girls actually want for a uniform. United Nations May Talks In Spring LONDON comment.ng on Under- secretary of State Sumner Welles1 announcement that United Nations' war aims will be discussed said Saturday that such talks might get under way this spring among the U. Russia and China. The British government and press generally welcomed Welles' pro- official quarters pointing out that discussion of eco- nomic matters was particularly de- sirable now. If You See A Coin Which Looks Like Cross Between Nickel And Dime It's New Penny WASHINGTON Tne Treasury Saturday put the new zinc-coated steel pennies i'lto cir- culation in limited quantities. They look like a cross between a nickel and a dime. Assistant Mint Director Leland Howard handed first samples to Treasury officials Later the Treasury's cash room started them in lots of 50 or fewer. Most of them were obtained Saturday by coin collec- tors and the curious. Ross the new pennies will save at least tons of copper this year. They are being struck at the Philadelphia Mint and reg- ular distribtuion will begin when the need for coins arises. Mean- while the traditional copper cent will also continue in use. terials being turned out by United Nations. The Berlin correspondent of tha Dagens Nyheter wrote that ths meeting is being held at a castle near in Western Ger- and that 16 generals and admirals and 31 industrial direc- tors also are helping plan and revolutionary methods of sav- ing raw materials and workers' energy. Willkic Is Candidate In Thirteen States In- dianapolis in s dispatch from its Washington said Saturday night that Wendell L. Willkic's candidacy for the 1944 Republican presidential nomina- tion will be entered in the 13 states No step has been taken to coin having primaries for selection of thp recently authorized Uuee-cent delegates to the national piece. convention.   

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