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   Galveston Daily News (Newspaper) - October 2, 1942, Galveston, Texas                                TWO THE SALVESTON DAILY NEWS FRIDAY. OCTOBER 2, 1942. age at Kort Ringgold and sold to a junk dealer. Among the thous- ands of shoes, said Cot' John anil Opt. Richard F. Rogers, were those used by the confeder- ate leader's mount when he was a lieutenant colonel at Fort Rfng- gold from 1S56 to 1WO. Tolling all Wednesday night. iom members of the Plainvieu- Lions ;hell Club dismantled unused light plant machinery and transported ft 60 miles to the city scrap heap. The volunteer crews returned at 5 a. m. from Frtona with a ten-ton engine the Southwestern Public Service Co, donated the club. The Lions have aold-160 tons of scrap in SO days and today Invested the they received In war bonds. Gray County has shipped an av- erage of 773 pounds of metal par capita since Jan. 1 and officials want to know If there's a better record anywhere. There art 23.911 persons in the, county and XW pounds of scrao have gone to help the war effort.1 Comat County ranchers haw been hauling old metal to their front entrances, sometimes two miles away. Some articles are too heavy for them to handle, how- ever, and now they hanging red lanterns from their mall-boxes to signal on a regular schedule through the hill drive In and make the pickups. The most thorough house to vacant lot to vacant lot, canvass In Houston's history under way. there. Homeowners, plant managers, and store owners north of the bayou yesterday, were ransacking every building and lot to gather in scrap. This (Friday) afternoon schoo.1 children of Houston will get a half holiday to 'knock upon all doors to see If the scrap has been gathered and they will help pile It up. More than a million school chil- dren over the state will be com- missioned Junior Texas Rangers this (Friday 1 afternoon, will 'be given badges to denote their rank, and then will add their mlphty weight to the drive to see that every ounce of scrap goes on the engineers. Action was taken on a suggestion of Mayor Flagg, who said that, In the event of a storm, detriment to navi- gation according to information he au reueiveu. A communication waa received V from E. E. ilcAdams of the Texas League asking the effect that gasoline rationing Ijwiil economic life of that and because of Texas' geographi- cal location and widely separated planned ____ lacea In Texas without transportation fa- lities. Mayor Plagg was delegated by Mayor Scrap Metal Heap Grows Larger As Texans Toil During Drive ANY TIME Pbaw J-5HI Ask for Key Features eluding Gen. Robert E. Lee's horw- Togefner for me firs! lime GEORGE PAT ;ued yesterday (Thursday) to puei heap Twcaru, are gathering canines were brought out or stor- ANY TIME MC ANY SEAT JANIT BLAIR MODOMffORD Plus Cartoon and Sport Shorts ATTEND THE SCRAP MATIHEE TOMORROW AT LBS. OF SCRAP ADMISSION ANY SEAT TILL5 P. M. 22c Childrtn and CRIME.SHORT NOW SHOWING (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) WALLACE BEERY ON THE SCREEN Galveston. It -was explained plan designed to meet the board to reply to the commu- is definitely against the proposed would work a hardship on people tivities and lack of adequate trans- Earl D. Mallory of the American Municipal -Association urging May or Flagg to attend a conference on war .-problems to be held at Chi- cago Oct. 21-23 was referred to the P. J.' Bellew was given authority end, provided thai an extra expsnse for water and sewer con- nections be borne by the owner. Parklnr Area Asked. A petition signed by of Dry Docks. Inc., asking that the board set aside a. parking area for ended on 20th, 21st and 22d was bus transportation after tbe crew completes its work makes it necessary for the men to have their automobiles for transporta- tion purposes. Reports for the month of Sep- tember submitted by heads of de- partments for 1942 and 1941 fol- Wo Sincerely Urge lou to Attend the Early Shows. For Choice Seats. NEWLAND PARK at HITCHCOCK FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2ND Music by JOHNNIE JOHNSON AM) HIS ORCHESTRA NEW Tex. With construction, work completed, official dedication ceremonies of the Joe Perkins Gymnasium, given to Southern Meth- odist University by Mr. and Mrs. .T. J. Perkins, Wichita Falls philanthropists, vrillbe held in the building Oct. 2, SJIU officials have announced. Mr. and Mrs. 'Perkins will the presentation of the gymnasium and Dr. Umphrey Lee, president of SHU, will accept for the university. v Dedication exercises will be conducted by-Bishop Ivan Lee Holt and an address is scheduled bv Bishop Charles C. Selecman. Bishop A. Frank Smith will intro- duce Mr. and Mrs. Perkins. A 30-minute concert by the SMU Mustang Band will precede the ceremony, which also will be the 28th annual opening convocation of Southern Methodist University. Following dedication of the gymnasium, Mr. and Mrs. Perkins will be guests of the university at a luncheon in Virginia Hall. Special guests will include all Ihe bishops and district superintendents of the Methodist church in Texas. ow: The first figure being for 1842, and the second for each case: Assessor and collector, nd J51.634.54; waterworks, 859.90 and city building nspector, valuations fees and valuations and fees, S419.15; city plumbing Inspec- or, and 5170.50; city elec- trician, and munici- pal airport, and municipal golf course, and i925.35; health officer. J165.25 and 1161.25; city sexton, and chief of police, and 55; fire marshal, Sld.25 and and in recommendation of George H. Gymer, commissioner of fire and police, the bid of Men chart Keller of-Houston for furnlshint a new Studebaker car, at a nel of for the chief of the fire department was accepted. questioned the board ..BRIAN DONLEVY MACDONALD CAREY ROBERT PRESTON Albert Dekker William Bendix Walter Abel Pttt Smith "VICTORY News Features as to whether or not It was pos- sible to obtain a car in Galves- ton, but Mr. Gymer said that the city had obtained the only one possible here as the others were frozen. A communication was received from E. R. CheeseborouRh com- plaining of the number of dilapi- dated cars occupying city' streets and asked if. there is not some method by which they could be removed. He cited one on the southeast corner of 23d and I and another on K between 39th' and 40th. It was pointed out that there Is a city ordinance which prevents automobiles from occupying city between certain hours dur- ing -the night, and Mr. Gymer waa instructed to have the acting chief of the fire department notify own- ers -to remove these cars from city streets. of AbtHmco. Mr. Gymer was given a two- weeks leave of absence, starting next Wednesday, and E. Lawrence Dorsey, commissioner of water- works and sewerage, was named acting commissioner of fire and police- during his absence. Use of the city auditorium Oct. 5 and 12 for wrestling- matches was granted Jerry Bhultz, and Club Mecca was given use of the audl torlum Nov. 4 for a dance. Miss Rosalie Joinetz, secretary In the city secretary's office, was given two-week leave of abntnce On recommendation of Commta- iloner Gymer, Allen Mallla, city Eardner, was made special leer. On recommendation of Mayor Flagg, Miss Adeline Oulsti was ap- pointed a clerk In the mayor's of- fice, effective Sept. 22. Appropriations of asked land, 54S7.COC; Paris, Tem- ple. Rep. Beckworth earlier .In the day announced the CAA bad al- located for Improvement to the Tyler municipal airport. No. derails were SIX (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) beef, 80 per cent; pork. 76; lamb and mutton, 95; veal, 100 per cent. Smaller slaughterers were limit- ed only to the amounts of their 1911 deliveries. A previous tentative announce- ment by the foods requirements committee had indicated that veal would be cut to 80 per cent like beef, but OPA officials explained that the armed forces ha4 indicated that tbey would not take such large quantities of veal expected. previously The 20 per cent limitation on cutter and canner grades of beef applied to federally inspected slaughterers. Those who are not federally inspected may deliver canner and cutter grades of beef In their civilian quotas in amounts not to exceed 25 per cent. Restrictions contained In the or- der are Intended to divert livestock THRKK AMERICANS LISTED flV RCAF CASUALTY ROLL Ottawa. Oct. 1. JP Names of three Americans appeared on a casually list Issued tonight by Royal Canadian Air Force, all of whom were on active duty overseas. Sgt. William Benjamin Fry Jr.. wife, MM. W, B. Fry lives at San Benito, Tex., was ported killed. Sgt. Le Roy John Boper. whose father, R. J. Soper, lives at 453 Adams street, Napa, Cal., was list- ed as missing after air operations. Sgt. Theodore Allison Deakyne Jr., whoss father. T. A. Deakyne, lives at Rldgewood. K. X. was.re- ported dangerously injured. SEVEN (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) Europe, must' shoulder also a part the sacrifices and burdens." His threat was directed at such as Sweden. Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Eire and and possibly at Bulgaria, which has not yet declared war on Rus- sia. "If today people In neutral capi- tals are eating more meat and fat than in Berlin or Rome, it does not prove that this will continue to bt so in ten Goebbcls wrote. British advices said weather con- ditions on the Leningrad and Mos- cow fronts already were approach- ing the point where troops could he withdrawn. Heavy action is expected in Egypt this winter and In the air over Britain and Western when Hitler's planes are disen- gaged from the Russian front. The presence of Field Marshal Erwln Rommel, axis commander in Egypt, suggested that Hitler had assem- bled his aides to lay plans for winter battles on the desert sands and for defensive strategy else- where. EIGHT (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) 300 naxls were killed and six guns. ten machine runs. 15 trucks and three ammunition dumps were cap- tured, the communique said. Threa enemy Infantry companies were lost in German attempts to retake the point. It added; Dispatches late yesterday also reported the recapture by the red army of three Rumanian-held set- tlement! In the same sector. The soviet relief offensive north- west of Stalingrad on the German flank was still going on. but the Russians did not mention any new ground gains. Five German tanks, two artillery and three mortar bat- teries however were reported si- lenced by red artillerymen. German tanks and automatic riflemen also failed in an attempt. to raid fovlet rear positions, the communique said. Six more nail tanks and 300 automatic riflemen were reported to have been de- stroyed In that venture. The Russians said their Cauca- sian armies fighting at Mozdok and southeast of Novorossisk on w from noninspected plants te In- the Black Sea coast stm r by the city ized. Resignation udltor were author- of Sidney O. Flake __ _ member of the fire depart- ment and Marvin Havard, City pa- trolman, to enter the armed forces were, accepted. On recommendation of'Commis- sioner Gymer, Lee Monroe Anthony and James Eramett Brantly were appointed supernumeraries in the police department. -fr Washington, Oct. 1. JP Sen. Con- nelly (D-Tw.) announced today he civil aeronautics admlnlstra- !on had approved allocations for improvements to the following air- ports In Texas: Denton, 000; Baaumont, Browns- ville, J200.000; Brownwood, 000: Gainesville, Van Horn. College Station, Galveston, Mld- rHONK WOO LAST DAY DavicTNiven Olivia DC Havilland HIS DARING WINS III) A E E I E C" A LADY'S HEART! K M T P U C O With DAME MAY WHITTY and DUDLEY DICCES rr.us CARTOON AND NEWS TOMORROW ONLT "Two Yanks in Trinidad" I "If It'i a Good Come to the ISLE" SBSBBBBBIBBI spected ones from .which govern- ment procurement agencies buy. "It Is further OPA said, "that tbe government will ready to all meat offered by these federally Inspected plants. Canned meat, sausage, scrapple, and similar not sub- ject to quota restrictions, but are affected because the meat used In their '-manufacture Is subject to such restrictions. Lard and such products u liver, hearts and kid- neys are also not restricted. The order waa intended to estab- lish an Iron clad control over meat to insure that sufficient quantities are conserved for the armed forces and The order. In effect a rationing at tbe packer level, does not specify how quotas shall be among different parts of the coun- try or between customers, but Price Administrator Leon Henderson said he had called upon the packers to see that "our available meat sup- plies flow steadily and evenly Into all parts of the country." He said he was confident the Industry would co-operate fullv. Henderson also asked consumers to comply with the government's share-the-meat program by holding per capita consumption to not more than pounds a week. Penalties for violation of the meat-quota order include a year's Imprisonment of fine, or both, and suspension of the right to deal In meat or any other ra- tioned product. The fennec Is a desert-dwelling fox Inhabiting North Africa- Shark hides were formerly used In carpenter shops as "sindpeper." holding. Three German tanks, sev en armored cars and 20 trucks with troops and ammunition were destroyed and 200 nails kilted on two sectors of the Mozdok front, while another BOO of the enemy were reported wiped out below Novorossisk. On the northwestern front above Moscow, communique said.' an- other 700 Germans were killed in unsuccessful assaults on red army The stalwart Russian stand at Stalingrad gratified all Russians. but sources made no attempt to minimize tbe gravity of the Volga River city's position. BASE COMMISSIONED Santa Ana. Cal., Oct. 1. ff A navy Ifghter-tban-alr base for di- rigibles on coastal patrol duty was commissioner today by Its com- mandant. Capt. Howard N. Coulter. Following the brief ceremony, Com. Alexander Mclntyre, In charge ot flying activities, com- missioned the squadron attached to the station. OLD PAINT BRUSHES ARE VALUABLE! Convirt thtm into CAIH Unoli Sim NMdt Briitlf! Paul Shean Co. 2021 fitrand Phone I-tlil ONLY THE BEST OF CARE Should Bt Exercised In Correctly Fitting you Choice of Many Smart Styles! Lucfe Optical' find! out for you whether you need glasses Todayl If you we will tmmedlatfily and scientifically fit you with the proper Innnm In flatter! nr and at lower prims, tool CONVENIENT TERMI IWjrulsr Valnel Value I '850 P- S12 50 prlcw Include scientific eiunlnillon or your precision pound lenses told filled frunn rlmlns mounMio In intirt LUCK-OPTICAL :TRISTV R.L.E. TOMETRIST- 2215 AvcniM E Phone 2-5521   

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