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Galveston Daily News: Thursday, May 13, 1937 - Page 1

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   Galveston Daily News (Newspaper) - May 13, 1937, Galveston, Texas                                OLEANDERS A public dance at Fort Crock- ett Saturday, ifay 22, will be one of the highlights o[ tile Oleander Fete, May 21-23 Con- cert by the 69th Coast Artillery Regimental Band is another fea- ture. tirn 96TH YEAE-NO. 33. W. L. MOODY CO. aerve4 BUT dorlai oer 7t luy serve yoot BAMKBBS 1IM on> tt.cw.OH OALVESTON, TEXAS, THURSDAY, MAY 13, 1937. GEORGE VI ESTABLISHED 1842 POMP Move to Recall Dodd Under Way as Result of Dictatorship Warning' Borah Calls Envoy "Disgrace" and "Scandal Nye Asks for His Removal WASHINGTON, May Borah of Idaho called Ambassador William E. Dodd a "disgrace" and a scandal monger" today after the envoy to Berlin suggested that if the Roosevelt recovery program is defeated a fascist dictatorship, financed by a may rule in the States. The diplomat had cited Borah's 1910 fight against the league of nations as an instance of "anti-demo- cratic" movements defeating the will of the people. A movement to recall Dodd from'----------------- Germany and summon hLfl before senate committee for question- HISTORY m THE MAKING: KING GEORGE VI ing gained headway. Sen, Nye (R.. N. D.) 'expressed the opinion that Dodd's statements were "pri- marily propaganda" for the Roose- velt proposal to revamp the preme court Nye's Statement. Calling Dodd's remarks improp- er Mr. Nye said: "He should be required to name the 'billionaire' he said he was told was ready to back an American dictatorship." Dodd's pronouncement, in which said that James 'Monroe and James Madison once Joined Chief Justice John Marshall In a "fight against stirred Mr. Borah to say: "I haven't read Prof. Dodd's statement It wsi iiml he indulged in attacks upon the 'Integrity and honor of some of the revolution- ary fathers. I do not propose to descend to the level of reading the outpourings of such an irrespon- iible scandalmonger." Dodd's thesis was that in the FARM FINANCE CUT IN MOVE FOR past the minorities, courts, congressional or -party splits', have often beaten reforms desired by thejieople. Ho contended that if the democratic party breaks up now, forces opposed to popular rule may take advantage of the split- to make "a Huey Long" die tutor. Rep. Fish (R.. N. Y.) told the house today he thought Dodd should be recalled to testify to :he senate and house "as to who is ths man who Is going to irfve to establish a dic- tatorship He made the suggestion during Senate Approves Dam Building, However Washington, Slay' The current movement to curb federal lost its first Britain's Monarchs Take High Throne Princess Margaret Rose "Humanizes" Brilliant Spectacle; London's Masses Stand in Slow Rain .LONDON, May thousand years of history lived and moved in. solemn splendor to crown George the sixth in hallowed Westminster Abbey today. Outside Lon- don's' massed millions cheered along a six-mile royal route from Buckingham Palace. But it remained for n 6-year-old girl the whole spectacle. Among the great of mighty Britain and envoys from the world, Princess Margaret Rose, youngest daughter of King George and Queen Elizabeth was just, a little girl. _ Untouched by solemn pageantry, she just sat back and enjoyed it all until she got tired and then she yawned widely and openly right at the venerable and august" archbishop of Canterbury. Princess Elizabeth, .her 11-year- construction of a TVA dam at Gilbertsville, Ky. The ballot ended a day and a half heated debate on spending. On the roll call the bulk of the demo- cratic majority approved an early start on construction of the dam which Is expected to require an an- pleted.   until com- Meantime economy advocates round at a session of the committee. It a proposed fund for soil conserva- to farmers, and cut 5500.000 from funds for forest pur- chases by the agriculture depart- ment, After much talk of economy, the house voted 385 to' 7 against Pres. Jooscvelt's request for a permanent MI'I to the "enate Instead a bill calling for a two-year exten- sion of the CCC. Shortli'thereafter uo senate labor committee favor- aoiy reported an administration bill AGING, BUT REGAL QUEEN MOTHER MARY VIVID CONTRAST TO YOUNG PRINCESSES appro- would approve Varied Shown by Two Children Ixmdon, May princesses saw their father crowned klnjf today, their actions as differ- ent as their ages. Eleven-year-old Princess EHza- jeth sat primly in her seat in the royal box, her attention fastened on the dramatic spectacle, before her. One day she may play the leading role In such' a ceremony, for she is heir presumptive to th throne. Beside her. little Princess Mar garet Rose, six and a half, trl her best to act as a princess shou at a coronation. But she couldn keep from squirming and loungii in her seat as the proceedings we K an "ur theo ries said Maj. R. W. Schroe fed- alr commerce, at i? day of tes- on o ballroom Hotel Galvcz. 30 a. Convention called order by Mrs. Carrie Franklin (Continued on Pago 2, Column 1) HINDENBURG BLAST LIMITED TO FOUR POSSIBLE CAUSES Lakehurst, N. J., May board Invct "gating the destruction of the lh. iii had to four causc" of the disaster Edward That Might Have Been His Own; Wedding Plans Are Indefinite (Continued on Page 7, Column n M. sc" o e In which 35 persons died an theo- DR. BODANSKY 0 MEDICAL COLLEG WINS m_ AWARD Research in Chemistry .Heart Action Outstanding Fort Worth, Tex., May The 1937 award of the Texa Pathological Society for outstan Ing hologl work research was given in the field" ol medica ay o es- researcn was give eyewitnesses of the Meyer Bodansky, In flames' last "'Thursday luuh Schroeder refused to ur It was believed one of them was'based on the possibility that a propeller >lado may have broken off and hurled Into the ship, starting tho hydrogen explosion. olarnnK of the advacccd since the disaster- was dealt a blow by a report of "ombs and ex- today to fessor lhoy STATE PENSION AID. Austin, Tex.. Mny house attempted today to aid tho approximately needy old persons In Texas who are worry- Ing about when they will receive their May pension chocks. It unanimously adopted a reso- lution urging congress to appro- priate money immcd.'ately to match state pension grants. Texas pen- sion authorities had said that lock of fedcral'matchlng money was de- laying the checks. Mi vidence In the wreckage to In- llcate a bomb or any other form ln thc Two federal bureau of Invcatl- through today's Lt. Com. Anton Hclnen. one of Americas outstanding authorities on all ships, and a naval reserve (Continued on Page 2, Column 4) pathology and chemistry at th University of Texas School of Me Iclne, Galveston. Announcement of ths award wa made by Dr. Charles Phillips, Tern pie, secretary of the pathologies eneral session Association. society before the ge of the State Medical In making the award. Dr. Phil lips said that the work of Dr. Bo- dansky on "The Chemistry o Heart Action" was Judged the greatest contribution fo medica science by a Texas scientist dur- ing the past year. The research work by Dr. Bo dansky was an Intensified studj of thr chemical reserves created >y the muscular action of the Jeart and the direction of these by-products in treating heart all "nents. Dr. Phillips, who headed tho commutes of judges for- the State (Continued on Page 2, Column 4) The Weather East Texas, Including Gaivcston cloudy in south, local thun- dcrshowers anil cooler In north por- tion Thursday; Friday partly cloudy, probably scattered showers near the coast. Light to moderate inuthcrly to easterly wlndB on the coast. West Toxos-Partly cloudy, some- wnat cooler In southwest portion Thursday; Friday partly cloudy Loulslana-Partly cloudy, scat- Icrnil thunilcnihowcl-H In southeast portion Thursday and Friday. Light to moderate southerly winds on the coast, Overflow Crowd Is Present At School's Golden Jubilee Contrasting an educational insti- tution with an oil refinery, Owen D. Barker, member of the board ol school trustees, told an overflow- crowd at San Jaclnto School's goldr en Jubilee celebration last night that .products of normnnont value. spiritual find Intellectual, gush forth from the educational wells. lsto u of 'ormer stu the school, former teach mer eac- eis ana others attended an elab- orate program given in commcmo- whool'i Both dnni- vcrsnrv ui thnt h" yWleil a Onlvoslon County oil re- finery recently and hnd observed how matorlyl product, were nVado "Tho products of tho school ore refinement, character and Intelli- he said. "This great school has done Its part In the past In producing the greatest products possible In the humon he stated, "and will continue to do so in the future He-declared that the products of a refinery are consumed In "a dav or year." but that the products of nn educational institution are of permanent value. i are engineers who con- trol this he stated, the they havo done a Job In community. The seawall, Krado-ralsing and causeway an some of tho symbols wo see nbou (Continued on Pngo 7, Column 6) Monts, France, May Edward, duke of Windsor, sat In a. rain-drenched French chateau beside Wallls Warfleld today, listening to B radio broadcast of the coronation that might have been his own, while a friend dis- closed their wedding would be de- ferred untU June. This close associate declared certain differences between'the royal family and the British government' bad brought the duke'i decision to postpone his marriage. The "differences" centered around the government's Insist- ence that tie ceremony should be private, the friend asserted. He said the nowly-crowned British monarch, Edward's next younger specially asked that the wedding be put off until tie dlf- flcultles are overcome. It was the opposition of the British government and the Anglican Church to Edward's wedding: to the now twlce-dJ- vorced American woman wild caused1 Edward to quit ils empire throne last Dec. 10 for "the worn an I It was indicated at tie chateau the announcement of the wed ding plans nevertheless may be made next Monday. The duke, who undentoo.. to bave been annoyed because tho engagement between Mrs. Warfleld and himself was dis- closed yesterday on the eve of nts brothers coronation, acted to "fe lvithm the (Continued on Page 7, Colu Surrender of Green Forces Is Ultimatum for Peace With C. I. 0., John L. Lewis Says J" 12-W-John U Lewis complete surrender from the American Federation InrlLt "l n Seace with his own Committee for Industnn Organization today-and declared he did not want peace. Addressing a meeting of. the' second large t of hs C I 0. International Ladies' Garment Work" n .t. wants peace; f i miue !omo tha t Is willing to concede the prln Iplcs on which the C. I. O. was ounded." But then he referred to the au omobllc workers he organized and louteW. "You can take my word for it ney do not want peace with the F. L. and neither do I.' He accused William Green, presi- MERRILL, LAMBIE '0 TAKEOFF TODAY Southport England, May 12.-JP Ick Merrill and Jack Lamble, can trans-Atlantic flyers they expected to take ofl om Blrkdalo Sands near here their return merlcan aid they any tomorrow for [ht to New York. They arrived at Spek'e Airfield, verpool. In the Afternoon after a nlght from Croydon Air- old, London. Pictures of the coronation which e Americans will tnke back were Ing rushed here by automobile. ixjnoon air transport company elded against flying the films re because of weather conditions. Merrill said ho might takeoff early as 3 a. m. (0 p. m. Wcd- sday EST) If weather permit- d otherwise waiting until dawn, rno aviators did not see the coro- tlon procession, but heard a ra- o description ot It at Croydon rdrome. Merrill and tumble flew from ew York to Cioydon Mav 9 and .carrying, pictures of the Hln- nburg disaster. DIPLOMAS GIVEN ELEVEN NURSES AT LOCAL JNFIRMARY Eleven students of St. Mary's School of Nursing -were presente  Quecn Mother Mary, gray-haired but still regal at nearly 70, saw her second son crowned today while mists of memory dimmed her eyes Twenty-six years ago the crown or England s queen was placed up- on her head in the same West- minster Abbey. On Jan. she .ollowed. a draped coffin from Westminster Hall when the body of her htisband, George "V, made Its last earthly journey. Today she was spectator. In her place, receiving the queen's crown was Queen Elizabeth. The first lady of the royal family, aside from (Continued on Page "7, 'Column 21 SOLONS BRINGS NO INCREASEJN WORK Tempo Slow; Probe of Expenditures Is Approved Austin, Tex, May eglslature plugged along- today with no signs visible- of increasing he tempo of its working activity despite tha fact it was the first day at the now rate of pay. On the 12Ist day of the genera] ession, which began Jan. 32, with salaries of members cut from the house of representatives overod four pages of a 150-page de- >artment appropriation iill, about lalf completing work on the meas- The senate approved a resolution providing for an investigatior. by a landing committee to determine whether which the itate spends each' blennium was be- accordlnB 'o the wishes f the legislature. ITALY IGNORES CROWNING OF BRItlSOUlER One Item Records Event; Strife Gets Space Rome, May cial Italy, angered by English press, taunts over Italian de- feats in the Spanish civil war, virtually' ignored the corona-1 tion of- King George 71 today. The only, report of the London pageant provided for th'e controlled press1-was a.one-line dispatch'is- sued by the officials news agency otefoni. uer jii-year- fsister j.nd heiress presumptive She6' i JL M uuiiesa presumptr. to _the throne, already Is queenly watched with _ and stately. ?o be Tickles Her Sister. Birl lvfRKled her ears tickled her sister, flicked a service book and fidgeted in f? Bho yawned, put her elbow on the- front ol the royal watched head as frifm6 the ceremonial from seats between their grand- int 1'h Quefn Mary' 'heir unt the princess roval. Elizabeth sat next to Queen the and with. not too much attention rrom her regal irrandmbther. who. of her massed jewels five ropes of diamonds Sf woman in Queen Mary, mother of abdicated Edward and the newly crowned -jeorge, appeared the I bulwark of he monarchy. Everywhere she was acclaimed with an added resperS .nat marked- her as one apart be- l pung woman "she had coronation of Edward VII. Just 26 years ago' she had "The coronation of King' George of England took place this morn- ing." was all it said. There was an account, how- ever, of disorders in Dublin The newspapers related that police dis- persed a crowd demonstrating against the "coronation of nn. Eng- lish king for Ireland." Radio stations had only the same reports as the newspapers. Members of Rome's British col- ony who tried to listen to London broadcasts of the coronation com- plained reception was poor. Local Britons attended a corona- tion service at the English church !P Sir Eric loved, of, her- people.1 As a y, watched th VII, just m jrctiia ngo sne nad. been crtwned in the same abbey her. V "and the young Edward there to would have been his destiny. Now she was reported leading the fight against govern- ment wishes that no member of attend the marriage of with hls beloved Walhs Wartleld in a French cha- -.uub. U41 jiiiu Drummond, British ambassador to Rome- Francis Sborne. British ambassa- dor to the Holy See; Albert Hey- ith African minister to manns, Sout; .cui minister tu Kome, and members of their staffs were present. An authoritative source said to- night Elizabeth Mackenzie, cor- respondent for the London News- Chronicle, would be expelled from Italy for sending "anti-Italian dls- (Continued on Page Column 7) After more or less desultory con- Ideratlon of other matters, the at noon until night, nd the- house from midaftcroon Iso until night, to permit members a attend the funeral of Dr H Y There was no telling when the (Continued on Page 2. Column 5) SENATE IS FINAL HOPE OF FDR FOR PERMANENT C. C. C. Washington, May senate became Pres. Roosevelt's today for a permanent CCC when the house stubbornly to its position that the life of the administration "pet" should be extended only tm- years The two-year extension was for- mally, voted, 385 to 7, despite strong administration desires that the re- lief unit he made permanent. alter the senate received the house bill. Its own labor com- mittee favorably reported a meas- ure giving' the CCC permanent siaius. It, like the house measure, pro- E enrollment of The house vote, confirming a standing vote of 224 to 31 taken yesterday, was the greatest show i I" that chamber since the revolt in 3935 against the .death sentence" In the utility hold- ing company bill. Privately? some legislators said.the "revolt" was not actuated so much by a desire to economize as by the fact thatmem- are In better posl- .ion to obtain camps and camp .pat- ronHpo with nnn ,_ _ PQL ronage with CCC in status. a temporary Simple Dignity Marks Final Rites for Dr. H. Y. Benedict Austin, Tex., May ages from the Bible and his. own oetry formed a solemn eulogy cad as thousands attended last tes today for Pres. H. Y. Bene- ct of the University of Texas. Students, alumni, associates and overnmont officials filed sorrow- illy bv tho flower-banked bier of o .beloved "Dean Benny" when 10 body, surrounded by a student lard of honor, lay in state In le mige hall of Gregory gymna- um. Simple dignity characterized the rvlces conducted by Dr. Thomas Vatt Currlc, president of the Aus- n Presbyterian Theological Seml- from Dr. Benedict's own In- Iratlonal yulctlde greetings which tide Good will 'to men. (Continued on Page' 7, Column 3) ANICO DELEGATES CONVENE HERE TO START MEET TODAY General Session To Be Held This Morning at Buccaneer Business sessions of the 32d an- nual convention of the industrial and ordinary departments of the American National Insurance Co. will get under way this morning at the Buccaneer Hotel with more than .500 delegates In attendance from all parts of the United States, Cuba, Puerto Rico and Hawaii. Approximtaely 300 industrial de- partment representatives had regis- tered yesterday and about 200 In the ordinary department, and by this morning the total number was expected to be considerably above that number. All day yesterday was spent In registration, visits to the home of- fice here and1 recreation. A general session is scheduled to- day at 9 a. m. in the hotel, when -lark W. Thompson, public rela- Jons counsel for the American Na- tional Insurance Co., will preside as chairman. R. W. Wallack, branch manager, ordinary department, Denver, Colo., will deliver the cation. Frank S. Anderson, general :ounsel for the company, will give :ne address of welcome, and re- sponses will be made by W Suth- erland, field supervisor, Industrial department, Dallas, and W. L. Vog- er, branch manager, ordinary de- partment, Salt Lake City, Utah Following introduction of home office officials, R. L. Daniel, "hair- man of the Texas board of insur- ance commissioners, Austin, will speak. Others speakers will Include: Col. C. B. Robhlns, manager and general counsel for the, American "Keep alive throughout the vear ver en. Obey the teachings of the Christ." "So spoke H. Y. Benedict IVe oved friend, the distinguished pub! ijerllant- the president of the iald Dr. Currlc. "Tho uniform testl- i ti rtinj Knew nin that his words were matched "new him i, by IIIUIVIIUU Ql his Inner nature and outward acts'- The band with instru- ments muted, played recessional music. CORONATION TWINS. Calgary, Alia., May nadian twins" ooy and a born to- ?nd Mrs- chrls Jensen of Glendale, a Calgary suburb. Naturally, they were named George and Elizabeth. George was born three minutes after midnight and Elizabeth 22 minutes later. In The News Today School trustees approve faculty list for next 0. Head of national Insurance groun addresses KoUry 14. Local steamship man named vice consul for Denmark, marine news 13. Man arrested as suspect in 1'ar- Butte slaying released to Illinois 0. Shipping reported active nt port on Pago 2. c-ohWo-   

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