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Galveston Daily News Newspaper Archive: April 28, 1931 - Page 1

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Publication: Galveston Daily News

Location: Galveston, Texas

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   Galveston Daily News (Newspaper) - April 28, 1931, Galveston, Texas                                In addition to Skcezlx, Joe and several other notables who pci- furm every Sunday for News comic readers, a wonderful new incident involving Turzan will be presented weekly. Again The ncoicd for UK readers In obtaining a new and modern novel. "Mad now appearing daily. Don't miss an in- stallment. 90TK 18. TEXAS- OLDEST MWEU-AriJt GALVESTON, TEXAS, TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 1931. ESTABLISHED 1842 WOLL RALLIES LABOR ON WET PROGRAM Resolution to Abolish Tax on Homesteads Adopted BILL OFFERED BY STEVENSON TO SET LIMIT FOR TRAILERS Drury May Queen Width and Weight Would Be Fixed by Proposed Law of Victoria Man Austin, April Both hnun'iu'S nf tin- Trxjis tfidny aduptc-d .iiiiuli.i iii ji-nctu imtnu lifl'.i IVnjii taxation. The srnate adopted a resolution to submit ;t eoiistifutioiiiil miK'iitlinciit 10 ivlirve all homesteads nj; to from stair taxation. The liniisr rcsnluliuii lir-M> {n thr value "T W.OUO. The Honale i evolution Hpon- :nicd by Senator Hardin of Steph- while KeprcHentuUve Bryant of Memphis was the tax ixcmptiun chfirnplnn in the house. Amendment TtofuMMl. Hrfore adopting the Hnrdin reso- lution, the senate refused to adopt "n amendment by Senator Hoi- 1'i'ook fif CalvcKton to reduce the to 52.000. The vote in :lw senate wan '11 to 4 and in the house JIO to 11. The between the two iCfomtionH wilt be worked out in free conference committee. If ap- proved by the leginlaturo the amendments would be submitted In November. 1932. The house rebolutlon exempted hoinpHteadu frc.ni all taxation, ex- ept for confederate pensions. The Hurdln resolution would abolith the state tax for nil Anntln Artnimenf. The argument between the legis- lature and the city nf Amrfln was merged today and did not ap- pear during Another tiuck i pollution bill Martha Adams, freshman at Drury College, Springfield, Mo., will be (uiren of the May n( the Kdiool s annual loblival. Pope Warns Fascists to Obey Church LETTER SENT TO CARDINAL DIRECT REPLY TO GIURIATI Events of Hoover Administration Are Presented With Exaggeration of Caricature at Annual Gridiron Dinner Washington, April stormy dtiwn found a. ship rolling heavily and Bpectators saw cHng- iiip stoutly the wltcel a mini resembling Gforgi? W. Wicker- chairninn the law en- forcement commission. lit; seemed to have distinguished company, on the deck were figures which looked like Sen- ators of Arkansas and FfKK of Ohio among others. Another excited member of the group, who walked and talked like Kepresentatlve Lajfimrdia of New York, rushed tu the helmsman. "Ancient Mariner IK- cried, "tills is the worst politi- cal storm I ever saw. Looks like democratic weather. How are we going to pet out of this "If you'll rend the, report of my answered the "an- ctent "you'll find I haven't Uie nlijjhtcst idea.' The scone; was the, selling for a Gridiron Chili skit tonight at its unit mil spring dinner. The Grid- iron Club IK comjmsc'd of Wash- ington newspaper men. Wleltcr- yham was one of I he autllcnco which inujrhed at the portrayal of the "eighteenth amendment trying to nuike harbor in ISW3. with the ancient mariner, Grorjjc IV. at .the wheel." President Hoover fclso was pres- ent to sefl eve.ntK of his adminis- tration presented with the cxap- Kt'ratioi) of carlcutiire, lllumiiiutrd by wit as privileged OR tlmt of favorite court jesters. The, barbs were scattered ImjH'.rtlully among repuhllcjuiK, democrats and pro- gressives and in one. sketch the club satirized one of Its own re- hearsals. The, chief executive was. given an opportunity to present his (See GRIDIRON FETE. Pase 2) TESTIFIES IN OF TIL OF EX- MANY CROWD INTO COURT- ROOM AS CLAUDE POND BEGINS; NIGHT SESSION HELD. Interference as Reply Is Written (See LEGISLATURE. Page 2) GREER STILL ANXIOUS TO PUT MANSFIELD AND BRIGGS !N SAME DISTRICT. Tex.. April '21.- for five nrw rongrcKfional with only thief mlck-tt for- Texas la problem facing the confiies- -innnl ledittrlctlnK committee, nr- coi ding Senator .Julian Grenr of A i-bali man of the nenate tin Rent tif the rommitter. who jl wonl'I br letieveil by one il-Jl] iff if C'iiiy Stonr BripK.s of t.inn mid J. J. Alnnsfiold of Columbus me in the same .hfiiSri. My tionblinp Ri IRRS and Mnn.-.field four new wouid crented without conRroHnmen, one doiiuind unfilled. No the rrdlHt riot ing i-ommlttcf wnt, held Monday but tho conferi-eri hope ibat k would be resumed Tuefidny in of whnt tihnuiri he .lone nml ihitt the nrtunl shuffling if the count leu will begin this, w-rrk. It wnn admitted by Cieer tluit the task Is discouraging and Hint it woidd probably be near the em! of the snnplon hofore the com- ritittrr reaebed nn ngrccment. He "nld bf believed tbnl il ultfmntr- ly will woik nut a bill but that it Ims i1 rent job nhend of il. Want Ooncroiwnien. Acc.inllng tn r.reer, five new (i iftfl nre wntiled in the following -fetlnnn- The Panhandle. Tfxati. the CnrptiR Chrisii nren, the Mldfilf We.sl around Sun Anpelo nnd thr AuMIn 01 rnpitnl din- The Weather Kor (J.ilveMon and Vicinity- Pail- Iv cloudy to cloudy nnd warr TtiPMlny: light to easterly t Ti-Miri Cloudy, M-allered in Houlh and WPH! pnrtfnnH 'liin'flay. cloudy. K  NO DECISION YET IN CASE- OF "BIG JIM" Montieui, April Couaineau reserved decision today in the habeas corpus plea of James Clark, alias Wilcox, alias Big Jim. Clark is said to be wanted at Corpus Tex., In connection with the seizure near there of a liquor consignment. The Canadian department of im- migration Is seeking to deport him on the ground he was convicted in the United States of a crime in- volving moral turpitudr and there- fore entered Canada illegally. Ho is fighting the deportation at- tempt. FORMER CZARIST OFFICER LOCATES WIFE MEXICO AFTER LONG HUNT Mexico City, April 12 years Vladimir Cornier, n captain In the army of the czar nnd of the white army of Itaron Wrnngcl, has dreamed of the dny when hr would he reunited with pretty Annn Dl- mitrl, whom be married in JOlfl he.- fore setting out on a campalcn ngalnut tlie bnlshnyikl. Yesterday hn found Anna wntk- iiin along the principal street of Mexico City, hut with nnnthev man. Sprglo whom, when she thought Cornier (lend In battle, she married. The former r.r.nrlst. officer, mad- riencd at the (bought of losing her NO yr-nr.s of hopeless scaicli. thrciitened tn shoo) Mirm 1ml h unless mine hack tn him. hul Annn. nftrr a moment's hlsi- tnni-r-. ebn-'r Id rrmnln wMh .T.nroh- Hz nnd called the police to protect i them Horn hri- foi nici husband. They nil unil to innit today Ifhl Hull Mmy In who t'lok uteciuitiunti for Anna's and Jacob- It z's safety. Anna recounted how when Cornier left for his 1919 cam- paign It wna only to be taken pris- oner nnd in rxilc to Irkutsk, Siberia. She settled down at Moscow to awall her husband's return, but after a year wor.l rnme. that the entire cnlony hnd been wipn) out by typhus the government 1s- n bulletin confirming hiE death. In 1923 she married Jncobltz nnd they came to Mexico to make their home. Cornier explained he hud escaped from t ho prison cam p short ly be- fore the typhus epidemic broke out, and. forbidden to re-enter Husslit, hud sen re bin! tli tough nuiny cnun- ti IPS for the wife whom some of hi. riiend.-. .vaid bad Mie culin- iiy. lie d'd not know, however. Hint sbo wai in Mexirn it was a complete .-mrprise when he met her (ijilve.sluii no jiuarer solving ils uluulric I'alt' tion Alunrliiy uflrrnoun nt end of n sccrd ftonfci'cnu: than il was oii-Kviday at the public hoaiing held to discuss the ol'l'ei1 ol! the Houston Lighting and Power Coniptiny to purehast: the Giilvoslon elecfrie properties, exclusive of its street railway. S. K. Rcrtron Jr., president of the Houston Lighting and Power Com- pany again told members of the board of city com mission era in executive session Monday that the company could not promise equal industrial rates with Houston for tbe next three years. Meetlnr Is Secret. While Mayor Jack E. Poarce e.m- phatlcally refused to permit a News reporter to attend the secret conference held by members of the board, It war learned that the Houston company was given until Thursday to present a new pro- posal incorporating the same In- dustrial, commercial and domestic rnteH an now prevail in Houston. The proposal was submitted by the Houston Lighting and Power Company two weeks ago asking permission of the board of city commissioners to purchawe the light and power business and prop- erties qf, the Galveston Electric Company. Under tbe proposal the Houston company would give Gal- veston the same residential elec- tric rate, but declined to give the same Industrial and commercial rates as Houston enjoys, for the next three years. It is thought probable that some definite action will bt> taken by the board on Thursdpy, al- though tbe majority of the board hub noL ao yet committed tUelf to a stand on the electric question. Jacob Singer, commissioner of fi- nance and revenue, has publicly stated thut he is averse to any schedule thnt docs not plncc Gal- vtsitoii on a parity with Houston In all elapses of power and light. It is understood that Mr. Singer flatfootcdly declined the Ho'uston proposal at the conference Monday afternoon. With the exception of A. D. Su- rf er man, street commissioner, who was out of the city, all members of the board and Bryan F, Wil- (See ELECTRIC FIRM, Page 2) SEVERAL RUMORED TO BE IN LINE FOR LOTHROP'S POSITION. That scvcial applications for ap- pointment to the office of county tax collector to fill the vacancy created bv the recent death of Capt. William O. Txithrop will be received by the commissioners r.ourt at its meeting this week was indicated by rumors current at the c.oui thouae Monday. County Judpr E. E. Holman memoers nf the court, out of re- spect to Capi. I-iOthrop, refused to discuss or consider any applications before Tuesday afternoon. The meeting of the. commissioners court sehrdulPd for Tuesday was post- poned, but will be held cither Wed- nesday or Thurrt'iny. Members declined to sny whether any action would be taken at that time to fill tbe vacancy. Present statutes require that the office be i filled hy nppnintrienl. Among those, who wort mentioned about tbe courthouse as probable npplicants for the post wns John K. Brolberfon, chief deputy tinder Capt. Ixitbrop, nnd possibly one other ippinber of the collector's staff. These other deputies nre; John H. Kernnn, 1C. J. Menrcman, John Knudppn. K M. Prendrrgast, J. M. Onrrndorfrr. Mrs. L. Rrinli And Mrs. R. O. Wilson. It WHS nlso i n mot eel thftl Mrs. will apply for the appoint- ment and t'.iat sh.1 would br pnnMd erpd even ahi Conoid Three Dioofces at Once on Grounds of Insanity Ky., April Divorce from three wives nt once was sought in circuit court here today by Alexander Run- yon, an Inmate of the Atlanta federal penitentiary. Kunyon was acquitted of a murder charge last February but was Rent to Atlanta for five years on an old charge of auto- mobile theft. Runyon sought divorce on the ground he was insane at the time of the marriage core- monies and was of unsound mind from 1918. when shell shocked in the world war, until 1930. He charges nil thret wives with abandcnment. GENERAL ATTACK ON REBELS PLAN OF WAR COUNCIL Lisbon, Portugal. April i A sreneral attack on tbt rebels In Madeira was decided upon for to- morrow morning at a war council of superior officers of ..he Portu- guese government's expeditionary force. The war council followed upon the first engagement between thfi rebels and the expeditionary force which took place tuday at Cannicel where the federnl troops went ashore, faced a group of 7fi rebels armed with machine guns and dismantled the Han Lourenco wirelps? station. The federal troops captured 17 prisoners. Their own casualties were 16 wounded. The rebel artillery fired on tbe transport Carvalho A ran jo. undei cover of whose Runs the landing party went ashore. The rebel bat- teries were silenced, however, by accurate return fire from the ship, supported by airplanes. The attack on the San Lourenco wireless station followed upon a series of fruitless efforts hy the government to Induce the rebels to surrcndef. Tbe rebels hnd been using the wireless station to broad- cast news. Tlie fray wttri of very short, dura- tion. The rebels broke, scurrying in all directions. When the warships Vnsco da Gania, Carvalho Arauo, Ibo and Zaire appeared off Kunchal yester- day panic seized the Inhabitants. Those living on the scntiont doned their homes and fled to tbe UNFOLDING OP SECRETS OF FAR-REACHING IMPORTANCE IN RELATION TO FU- TURE TAXATION. London, April deep throated laborlte shouting "God Save the land to the people." a nc from an old English political song, sounded the keynote of the British national budget which Chancellor Philip Snowden, intro- duced in parliament lodnv. Pale and wan from his recent Illness and operation but a tired smile 011 his face, Mr. Snow- den received tumultuous cheers from all parties as he hobbled Into the house of commons. The unfolding of the budget's secrets in the incisive manner proved to he in the nature of an anticlimax as far as new taxation was concerned, but were of far reaching Importance hi rela- tion to the future taxation on Brit- ish land values. One Increase Imposed. Chancellor Snowden budgeted for the financial year 1931-32 an esti- mated expenditure of (about and calcu- lated the revenue at labout He imposed only one increase in taxation on the Brltsh additional two pence a on gosuli making a total tax of six pence a gallon and bringing the retail price to 32c a gallon. The chancellor resorted to two financial transactions, not affect- j Pii., April 'J7. Wull. presi- dent of tin- American finn of fmlny upon all laboring men to unite in efforts fo modify the J8th miiL'mlMH'iil. Woll made his plea ;it a con- ference of orgnnfzed labors nation- ill rnmmfftf" fn- nwnffi-itlnn o' the VolHtead act. A report sub- mitted to the conference declared a coiiRressional survey showed modification of the Volstead act possible in 3032. Heads Committee. The report, prepared under di- rection of Woll. who is bend of the committee nnd I. M. Ornburn. president nf the Cigar Makrr.V In- Union, said: "Our sur- vey indicates that victory is in sight If those who hove voluntarily enlisted in this case will make their known to the senators and congressmen from their ptales." Woll said today, "is becoming nn Important question in labor phases. Congress bos dip- regarded facts and baa been fol- lowing whims and fancier which lend nowhere. It is taking the bid- ding from organized minorities, not from the opinion of ils con- stituents, "Too Much Luw." "There Is too much law and or- der today. It IB unfair. I want to sec the shackles of Injunction broken, If not by 'awful methods, their' through physical resentment. I am strongly opposed to milk and water methods of voicing dlaan- proval. "Labor IB against the saloon, but God suve us from the speakeasy. I am uppustil to bul if congress in justified in regulat- ing the conducts and habits of thf nation, then it Is also justified in sorlnlizinr property." Dr. Irtrnpl Goldstein, rabbi of tin- congregation H'niii Jeshurun, New (Sec LABOR MEETING, Page 2) BURKE SENT TO JAIL FOR LIFE Maximum Penalty Given Killer of Officer. (See BUDGET REPORT. Page 7.) CAREER OF OKLAHOMA GANG BELIEVED ENDED BY AR- REST OF MAN. bills. The rebel authorities carded thr island with posters (18t r urging the population to stand fast "ngainst tyranny." Oklahoma City, Ok.. April Confident they wore about to bring to a close tlie corciM- of the Kinies- Tprrell hnntl of outlaws. Oklahoma peace officers turned tonicht to- wmd Henderson. Tex., whcrr Paul Mnrtin. sought as the ganc'd last member, is held. Superintendent C. A. Burns of the state burcnu of criminal identifi- cation, awaited the arrival of Sher- iff Jim Storrnont of Okmtilgep County, before depaiting for Texas with p. warrant, charging Martin with r slaying at Beggs. Oh., dur- hi2 n hank rohbrry. Burns the at a Henderson tour- imp last nifiht, also was vant- (See KTMEK f'.ANG. Pntrr 7.1 St. Joseph, Mich., April Pleading guilty to the slaying of Patrolman Charles Skelly of St. Jo- soph, Fred Burke was sentenced life imprisonment at hard labor in the Michigan brmich prison at Mni- quette by Circuit Judge Charles K. Whitr today. Burke, who has been called "the most dangerous man i'r- coived the maximum penalty under the Michigan law with unconcexiv Judge Wbtte sentenced Burke'for second degree murder, holding thai there was evidence that Burko had been intoxicated when he shot UIP Patrolman and bad not been able to premeditate the act. Early tomorrow morning will start for under heavy guard. Patrolman Skelly was slain when ho attempted to question Buvlif about a collision between his caT and one driven by Forest Kool, a farmer. Before sentenced was passed today Judge White heard routine testimony from Kool and Dr. Clayton Emery, who attended Patrolman Skf.ly just before lif died. Burkr was brought to Michigan March after n nationwide search had endrd with his arrest in a Mis- souri lannhonsf. The slaying .of Patrolman Skrlly nnrl fMglil from St. Joseph, whore ho had be'rn posing as Frederick Dane, laid baro thc> trail which had been cov- ered for several months. T r j- n Impeachment of Mellon to stanb Mt? Be Sought by Texas Solon MAD Aurilin. Tex., Apiil Wright Patman. from Pnunan charged Mr. Mellon holding office in violation of the Texnrkflna. s-ald tndny he wculd lnw- br- wni in "irv T T I T f T the impeachment of Andrew tnp "business tif trade or com-i jjj I V j I j j Mellon, veteran fpcrrinry of the nicrce" and was a part owner nf! t I f j I treasury at the next session of i onp tpr seatroing vpFwif. The] i. J. J- JU congress which convenes in DC- 'aw cember. serving a: Patman stated impeachment "J7 fnci r would br tbe only way to oust Mr. i Mellon because Piesidrnt Hoover would refuse to submit his name to the iKMiiiic for contlrmiillon. President Hoover 1m? cited dent to s'hmy Mi. Mellon enn con- nnn.v- Id she not flip a for-1 thuie to hold oVticV wit'honi" ndil'i- I i I tfonnl coni'n mation. Pntman person fron secretary of Hie trcas- j ikes him juibjeel to im- Piitninn said. "Mr. Mcllnn has admitted ovei bis sijrnnturp that h" nnd hi ol hern own the ('.nlf Oil Com- Aluminum Company, the Start this "CW StOty Of by JcSSIC Douglas FOX. TODAY (Sec IMPKAC'IIMENT. I   

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