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   Galveston Daily News (Newspaper) - October 9, 1918, Galveston, Texas                                She altregtirn 77TH 182 GALVESTON, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 19ia ESTABLISHED 1842. PRESIDENT GERMANY DIRECT QUESTION HOHENZOLLERN FIRE SALE NOW ON! SBNATOE JONES FILES STATEMENT WITH SENATE -JUDICIARY SUBCOMMITTEE. Would Enable Extended Inquiry on Activities of Individuals and Com- panies Beyond Financing of Times. WashiiiRton. Oct. that the Vnitcd States Brewers' Association and individual members have secretly fi- iiatiLt-d lie w fimpc1 in the intercut of. ths liquor traffic, contributed to the Na- tional Herman-American Alliance, been convicted of corrupt political practices and improperly influenced ytate and na- tional legislation were renewed in a Jones of Washington, republican, with the senate judiciary .subcommittee inves- ticHtinir loans by brewf.rs to Arthur Brisbane in connection with his purchase of the Washington Times. Senator Jones, author of the resolu- tion adopted by the senate and under Tvhiel, IVio t Io nt-e- fcrntcd his menK.'randiim for the purpose contending that the inquiry is un- limited in scope and not. as has been cupK'e.tted, confined alone to the Wash- ington Times. "The resolution wns drawn, and pur- posely Senator statement de- clared, "so that Any comi.iittee actinf? under it would have ample authority to follow any lend that mlRht be developed and that it deem desirable to fol- low by sr.bpen.'JnK of documents or In- dividuals to appear before it in person or otherwise, in order that the full truth or faulty of these charges may be es- tnhliHhed." The question of the .scope of the inves- tigation authorized has been raised by theh and .Senator Over- man, chairman, viatcd nl the lajt meet- ing thnt the ipiest Inn should be decided hv the full committee In hix memnrnn- Oum submitted today Senator Jones paid neither ihe numerous recitals In the res- olutions, preambles, nor any remarks In the senate were Intended to limit or res.riet the innuirv. I-'very charge mr-de, h" do.-lrxred. will" be fully support- ed by documents of Alien Property Cus- todian Palmer and the department of jus- tice. UornrarnUi to KutaJbliah Documentary evidence alone, the mem- orandum asserts, will establish the fol- lowing factM: "That the I'nlteil States Hrewers' As- H.'ocl.-ition. individual brewers and cor- porations have financed newspapers In the interest of the liquor traffic, and de- ceived tin- public UK to seen1! jirranffe- nientu for money loaned, which in some rn.if.o was to hr- repaid only at the discre- t..'ji i In newspaper owner out of tile profits of the. paper, if there should be any profits. Kocintlon and certain individual brewers. who helped finance certain newspapers advocating liquor traffic, also contrib- ute! !.i (hi- i Alliance and financed the publication of jtii officint nfter ih" oink-np- the Kusitania and other similar Herman "Tmt 'lie I'pitorl S'.'.I'T ciiition and certnln individual brewers and brewery corporalions have been eon- DESIRES TO KNOW IF MOVE IS SINCERE OR MERELY PRETENSE EHIBUE HUES 1 IN FKANCE FORCE ENEMY LINE TO GIVE FEOM CAMBBAI TO VERDUN. LEAVES DOOR TO PEACE OPEN, BUT JUSTIFIES PROLONGING WAR AND USE OF FORCE TO is sm THE UTMOST WITHOUT LIMIT From Two to Five Miles on Twenty-Mile Front. Ky Associated Press. v'biiii t iiv iintiHii tn Kmnee. Orl. Kmit victory,  I" 1KK.I) Of OTA M'> i( V <'-tv 1 1 i n T V t .in W i p r. t i '11 r. I t I) X 11 t n.1A r.p! 'ons total The fact that today has bc.cn desig- nated as Louis A. Adoue memorial day in the fourth liberty lonn campaign in (ialve.itop. prompts the members of local committee io believe that the miles during the dny will lie unusually large. John Scaly, f'.alveston County campaign chfiiniian, said iii.st iiinht. that every c.alvestonian who purchases .1 lib- erty bond today will display apprecia- tion of the patriotic services rendered by the late Mr. Adoue nnd thnt is con- fident thousands of residents will come forward to Like this means ns raying a tribute to their departed fcl'ow citi- who wns for his activities in patriotic work. totaling nave iieen mndf in tin- city and county since the driv.- started, neeordini; to Ji statement :ssued by Mr. Scaly. Suli.-ieriptions total- ing are now needed to fill the county's ciuota of and Mr. Scaly will he so Inrge thnt they push the coun- ty 1-is-- to its final who knew fyoiiiq A. Adoiie Washington. Oct. a continued decrease in the number of new cases of Spanish influenza at army camps was shown in reports today to the office of the surgeon general of the nrmy, the spread (if the malady among the civilian population over the country apparently still is far from being checked. liejiorts to the putilie health service showed thnt the disease was spreading rapidly in the Soulh nnd that it also was epidemic in portions of the Middle West and Far West heretofore free from it. Smith Pakota was added to the list of slnt.-s reporting the- disease- in pi- ni'c form, while outbreaks were :rom n number of st.it es. Pining the twenty-four hours ending day at noon new onses of int'ln- enxa huve been reported by all army camps. This was a sharp decrease over discs of pneumonia also decreased, total- ing only and deaths were fewer Til. FOIIT SMITH (AHK.t SCHOOLS AUK I. UK said Mr. Scaly. "What Mr. l-'oi't Smith, Ark.. Oct. S. Spanish in- fluenza developed in this city with so much rapidity during last nnd to- Hint Hie orders elosmfr the puhlic schools, closing down theaters and forbidding public and private gatherings of any nature. Three am! there are mam scrums cases, includ- ing several ptiysinans oi me inrendy de- ,ii m-'Hicn! m--Ti By Associated Press. The complete withdrawal of the troops of the Teutonic allies from oc- cupied territories is essential to the commencement of any peace discus- sion? with Germany. This fact has been made known to Germany and Ausiriu-nungary uy Wilson in answer to the recent appeal of the German imperial chancellor for an ar- mistice on land and sea and in the air and the discussion of possible means for ending the war. Meanwhile the entente allied forces everywhere are defeating (lie armies of the Teutonic allies. In France they are fast carrying forward maneuvers which are resulHng in the enemy's line giving way from the region of Oambrai and Verdun. Likewise in Macedonia and Turkish theaters the cleaning up process continues unabated. Over front of twenty miles be- tween Cainbrai and St. Qurntin the British, American and French troops K! af-l H Wlliell ifo c-too-n IT o 11i o from liiKiily imzuu tactical posi- tions to a depth of from two to five miles. Numerous towns have been captured and seemingly all the great defensive positions of the enemy in this region have been obliterated. Large numbers of prisoners have been added to the already great throngs captured since the allied offensive be- gan. Ih addition, terrible casualties were inflicted on the enemy by the heavy artillery fire at the beginning of the attack, which began early Tuesday morning, and the machine gun and rifle fire of the attacking forces against the enemy, who resisted stub- bornly at various points. The American troops, fighting alongside the British, always we.re in the van, and when night fell their po- sitions were where the points of pene- tration of the German line were great- est. At. last accounts hard fighting was still in progress with the enemy steadily giving ground. uu uif bouuiftii jiart oi nit: uaiuo front, from the. Rheims sector tr. Meuse, the French and Americana are carrying out successfully their con- liiu V cilic.iiL iiuilUvitUu itilu oil all sector? have gained additional WASHINGTON, Oct. Wilson has met Germany's peace note with a move which, at one stroke, will develop whether her proposal is sincere or merely a pretension and if a pretension it be, fully justify for all time before the world the prolonging of the war with force to the utmost, force without stint or limit. At the same time the president has left wide open the door to peace. Declining to propose an armistice while the armies of the central powers remain on invaded soil, the president today called upon the Ger- man chancellor to state, as an absolutely necessary preliminary to a reply from the entente allies and the United States, whether Germany accepts the principles of peace as repeatedly laid down, or merely pro- poses to accept them "as the basis of negotiation" and whether the chancellor merely speaks for the German military masters conducting the war or the whole German people. As the full significance of the president's diplomacy is disclosed it becomes evident that he has left open the way to peace and at the same time left the militarist leaders in a way that will lead to peace or confront them with an embarrassing situation in their own countries. Among diplomats here the president's communication is regarded as one of his master strokes. It is pointed out that upon cursory ex- amination it may not show such strong terms as some may have desired. AU the president's advisers, however, are confident that as close con- sideration reveals its full import, it will be apparent that it is a long step forward if Germany really means peace, and that if she does not it will strip bare another hypocrisy of German diplomacy so completely that the responsibility for prolonging the war never can be charged to the allies, even by the German people themselves. The text of the president's communication was made public today by Secretary Lansing together with the official text of Prince Maxi- milian's note now published in America for the first time. At the same time officials let it be known that there would be no reply at present io ibe Austrian note similar to tnat oi tne uerman cnanceilor. It is not considered necessary to deal with Austria until the time comes for a reply to her dominating ally. j The following correspondence was given out at the state depart- ment: Se.crcta.ry In nrni'uncir.p; his action. an.xing issued the following: "Department of State. Oct. 8. would Inkc long to tell anil the city. n "'1 thot wqq re'-'pi-.n'--! M-- for pllttillLT tlie ennil ruii] third liberty loan d--ives in s r I i s) i n t i v i .11 r (Int y a l i inon in 1 jijipri lln Ml. AUIIIII- rendered. we hrive the npp.-irt uni If Mr. Ad'uie wi re living he put f-M'tll l T OK IM'i.l ci. di aec.iunt icd'iy n (-losing cily picture 1 r has passed. l UHS !'-lf 'IIT'-O till tlllil junotion of tho Aisnc and Suippe riv- placing thr German from around Laon anrl oat'twnrd in prrat jnopaniy. forc.fs liiivr mei ll.cil gains all on thr onstrrn ArmTirans front along tlir US ell.lenv 1., KI t lose to 111- fuel, c.'.-n I'v tonurht I BRITISH CASUALTIES FOR WEEK ENDING TUESDAY TOTAL Mr i" 'v r i M i h r i- or. .1 Mr a- p i c: i r  Ill I it .1 loe .Itiuh anil MI Serbia. Inlr Uritish have driven n ill s no; ih are t o (he ef- K tsii a in no. ii as re thf Turks have sent lonro in Albania in Palestine the nt K> ire. ihe nnd Hint The secretary of state makes public the following communications: "From the charge d'affaires ad interim j of Switzerland, in charge of (Jerman in- i teresis in the I'nited States: i "legation of Switzerland. Washington, D. C.. Oct. fi, of tier- j man Interests. "Mr. President: T have the honor to transmit herewith, upon instructions from my government, the original text of a communication from the German j government received by this legation I Inte this nfternoon from the for- i eign office. A.n Knglish translation of j this eommunicat ion is also inclosed. Tint ili-rman original text, however, is alone j tn be considered as authoritative. Please j accept. Mr. President, the assurances of j my highest consideration j "K. (iKDIOKUlXi I, i d'Affaircs A. I. of Switzerland, i in Charge of Herman Interests in the I United "Mr. Woodrow Wil.inn, President ot ihe i Pnited Slr.tes, Washington: i Inclosure. Trimsiniioii of communication from i the t'nited Ktntes as transmitted by j chnrge d'affaires A. I, of Switzerland n Oct. 6. "The (irrmjin arovprnnW'nt rp- Oiirolx Ihp prmlilrp.t I nltrd Six ten of A morion to tnkc Ktppt< for of Io notify In Ini-lto to for the of n for Hip nrtroiiidon.-i (hr proirmm Inlil (lie prrnidrnt of nHoil States in (ill. Io .-oiiprrsn nf .Inn. .S. Ir. pro- iiouaceiui n.iftlriil.irly In hN art- .IrCH. of 27. In order to nvolrt fiirtln-r UK- noternnicnt to hrlns; nnont lip Immrdlntp of a HFH- urm-lnilpv on iund, on wnlor (n lltr nlr. iMUX'K. or ninr.v "Imprrlitl Kriim 111" Id 111- retiuf-st you to make the following com- munication to the imperial Gorman chan- ce 11 o r: making reply Ihr w- qnrxt of thr Imperial RW- nod In order that rr- plr tw and Htrmleht- forTrnrtl an the momentous tnvolvnl require, Ihe premldent of the 1'nlted ileerax It neeexiuiry Io himself of the exnet mean- litK of the note of tlie imperial chan- cellor. thr- imperial chancellor mean thnt the Imperial (penman erninent acceplN the termx the preitldent In hlx addrem to the cwngreim of the I nlted Stated on the Mth of .laniuiry nnd In mnncqnrat nddremeN. nnd thnt Itn ohjeet In en- tering Into ilineUHHionN be only to ng-rcc upon the practical of their a. 'I'he prcnldcnt leeln bound to MJIV reirnrd to the of an thnt he would not feel at liberty to propone a of hOKtllltlen to thf governments Trlth -rrhleh the 1'nlted SfatCN IH the central long an the armies of nre their noil. The good faith of any ilCNctutttHMi ilepenil upon the conncnt of the central pow- Immediilntely to nHthilraiv their everywhere fnun Invaded ter- ritory. Is tliai In- S., jtmtiflcil In nuking nltether the Im- perlnl ctinnrellor Ix npeaking merely ftir the iluleii un M ".Mr. Frederick Ocderlln. Charge dVAffnlrcN of Ad In- in Ass--c .lied I'" ..l I nltert M for Itepl? 1 nicht i I i Ml hehnif onnnupd on i ,igc   

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