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Galveston Daily News Newspaper Archive: June 20, 1915 - Page 1

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Publication: Galveston Daily News

Location: Galveston, Texas

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   Galveston Daily News (Newspaper) - June 20, 1915, Galveston, Texas                                Edition This paper has been deliv- ered to a subscriber in the Galveston. 74TH YEAR-NO. 71 SulMcribors' Edition This paper has been deliv- ered to a subscriber in the MOST Of TRAVEI.KIIS ON 111 KOIU> IM3K.M IT OJfl.v SOLUTION OK THE PKOBl.lvM. "MEXICO SOIELY milDED" TrMiavort Broiuclit to Gal- vc.lon Srvrral liar. Sprilt In   for a Waritt World at faceting- Hrld In Caraeate Hall lu IVtvr lark. New York, June 19.- polltlcs, unless he yields W the dictation stood fur the use of force In Internattcn- of his commanding general, Alvaro Obre- al affairs and which, the former secre- gon. and other high officers in hit army, j tary of state declared, were Inimical to Official advices toflay revealed that the true .Interests of this country and four of Carranza's cabinet ministers had the cause of International peace, resigned and that General Obrec-on was j Mr. Bryan began his address by declar- tnsisting on their retention as well as i ing that he could find no more favorable the dismissal of the members to whom f auspices than those of tonight for be- they were opposed. j ginning- the work which he felt it his to MarlnfB1 Landing. j to "in the crystai- half-civilized bandits who call them- selves revolutionists. "Mexican soldiers have a great feel- ing of disregard for Americans and American threats. The Tampico incident and the Vera Cruz occupation heightened their disregard and contempt o thou- sandfold. This feeling will be erased only when our government chooses to show them the error of their ways." The Buford weighed anchor In the roads shortly before 6 o'clock yesterday American marines to rescue Americans i between_ this country and the belligerent In the Y.iqui Valley, indicating that he j would regard such action as a hostile in- I He alluded to the "labor element" an vasion. Inasmuch as Maytorena prom- an "honorable and declared ised to send troops to the region to pro- that no advocate of peace could have a me'nt'wnUra SSrtnSi "s" Lan only If absolutely necessary, it Is under- laboring man, who, without any pe- the Incident closed, cuniary interest in war, neogsixei that 8rrlVal the It was hurtful to h'm, bringing about Tho situation In the Yaqui Valley was enforced idleness, incroailng taxes and overshadowed, however, by the cabinet in calling upon him probably among the SUNDAY, JUNE 20, 1915-FORTY-FOUR PAGES German Hussars in France Doing Scout Duty Along the Banks of Contested River Aisne ESTABLISHED 1842. ed almost overnight. The dissension in the Carranza cabinet, according to offi- cial reports, started from a ne.wspnnpr attack by obe of the cabinet members on his colleagues, but in many quarters here It was believed the trouble was of long standing, and the culmination of differ- ences between Carranza and Obregon, which began when the latter occupied tne City of Mexico several weeks ago. Obrrgon Stand. The fact that Obregon had telegraphed -arranza insisting on the retention of the pur cabinet Cabrera, Rafael Zubaran. Escudero Verugo and Jesus first two, of whonvwere n Washington for a long time as rep- resentative? of Carranza, was generally a> an Indication of Obregon's as- cendency to the puiition of political prestige In the constitutional movement. -News coming through official channels hat Carranza had removed his head- uarters to the old isolated fortress San de ylao, in the harbor of Vera spread the impression that he eared an uprising against him in Vera -ruz. American warships lying In the would give him asylum should he esire to escape. The cabinet crisis in Vera Cruz has alted the movement of General Pablo onzales on the City of Mexico. It Is ot known what his sympathies are but e has always been personally friendly o Carranza. General Candido Agullar nd several prominent Carranza chlef- cii.uii.ij. utjiuit; u u emeu yeaierctav u f v, .norning, and by 7 o'ciooic was Jied up to the dock at I'ler 11. At, o'clock the gangplank was lowered, and the passen- gers, who had been all morning, stepped to the docks. Prelimi- naries had been so well arranged that within an hour and 8. half the last one had left tile steamer. Hut until noon most of Ihe refugees Kfent an uncomfortable time on tne open wharf. The pier Is not a large one, and flirt of it was filled with cotton. The conglomeration of almost three hundred persons, crowded within a small space, attempting, with customs officers, to get a small mountain of baggage unraveled, may better he Imagined than described. on the Job. Sam A. Maverick of tho customs de- partment, with fifteen Inspectors; .Tamea K llryan. inspector in charge of the I'nited States Immigration department, here, with a full staff, and a comple- ment of men from the quartermaster's department, aided by the Buford's of- tlrers and crow, worked with might and main to get the tangle straightened out, nml by noon h.-i'l all of the baggage ex- amined, Inspteted and the refugees passed. It was a remarkable piece of considering the circumstances. Rack of the wharf a fleet of public Jtutomobilc-s had gathered nnd these were MIOII whirling the refugees away, to up- town hotels, to the railroad station and lu ihe Mullory dock, More than two hundred tickets for cities west as far as Francisco and east to New York h.-ul keen sold before the refugees landed and the holders of the majority of-these went at once to the station or to the .Hleainship dock, and by nightfall were well away on tile second kg of their Jiuirney. A large number went to downtown too, for a comfortable night's sleep DI fore continuing their journey. A very small per cent of the passengers "ii the Buford destitute, although some were. These cases were being in- last night by Inspector Omrge Bryan and Dr. Henry Cohen, ropresentative of tho Ameri- an Ked Cross. War In Remitted. Through presentiitiOM to the trcas- ;ry department by local customs offi- ers, the emergency fro.r tax WRS not from the refugees. Hather 11 va.s collected, but refunded t-> them by I'eclnl permission of the department. 'liis tax provides a ;5c assessment for iiosu with baggage and valuables ivorth mil. 50c for those with baggage valued I ?500. for those with baggage valued and for all above t'lmoms .'ri.vrs hold that Ihe law Is meant for and nut refugees being ivugh necessity brought back to their Bin 'fourteen of the alien passengers detained by immigration officers lii-y are being nt-hl at the station across 'ie channel pending- a further examlnn- tnclr cases by Immigration of- Taken as a whole, Ihe refugees were i hnpny lot. and particularly were they .eased with the accommodations and them while on the Jin- "I. -virtually every one of the pas- .-eiv. called nt tho cabin of Captain I'. Mevcnnln before disemhiirking tlinnk him and of '-lew p.- their kindness. .A resolution krniuu.i itimi forwarded to the v 'ir -.-ent by wire. (o Red sympathy with Obregon and while there is little definite information available the impression In official quarters to- night was that Obregon .-night succeed Carranza Hirst chief of the constitu- tionalist movement. Obregon recently lost an arm in a battle near Leon against the forces of Generals.Villa and Angles. Outlook In Clouded. Just what relation the cabinet, dissen- s Enint Vera Cruz llave the pos- sibility of a coalition of the Mexican factions to restore peace is not apparent us yet to officials here. Carranza has returned a polite "No" to all overtures thus far made to him and the prevailing opinion here has been in this action he was supported by his cabinet and Oen- erni Obregon. Is patiently waiting ls .Patiently for the situation in Mexico to Itself more clearly before announcing his move. The president develop expect more for the fac- aftermath of war to be borne In measure by him or family. With Labor. Therefore, Mr. Bryan argued, it natural that a' peace movement should begin with the laboring man and that organized labor, becauie of Its readily operative machinery, should take the lead In such a matter. Mr. Bryan con- "Those who work in the-cause of peace will find it necessary to combat the forces of militarism aa well as to do edu- cational work in the principles upon which the hope of permanent peace rests and I deem this an opportune time and place to enter a protest against two or- ganizations which ate already asking the support of the public. Both of these organizations are officered and manned by men of great respectability. "One of these organizations has for its object a large increase In the army and navy. It has set for Itself the task- of providing for the national security and It is busily engaged In minimizing the force and ef-fectlveneus of our army and navy to furnish arguments in favor of the enlargement of both. "Rx-Presldent is the most potential factor In this eroup, and It Is quite natural that on account of his TEl'IfiNS MY OF MIMBERG FORCER MILES Of THJU UAHCIASi CAPITAL. IWO Mifi[ CIIIES JRE Grodrk and Konmrno Fall From Takr Kond Buval by an by Bain News Service. OHE OB- THE MOUNTED SEEN HAS BEEN WOUNDED BY A FRENCH SHARPSHOOTER. fillS IN U, MATTOHEBTA'S WEST ORDERED TO RE- SIST JLA1VDI1VG OP AMERICANS IN I.OWER CALIFORNIA. prominenc. trshiiTVTewi his __ e should direct the general policy of the organization. He discredits not only the intelligence, but even .the motives of those whom he contemptuous- ly describes as pacificists and advocates of 'peace at. any price.' He more than intimates that they are physical cowards and that their attitude on International questions Is due to bodily Injury, f Not to Auirer on Same "Plane." 'It Is not necessary to answer Mr. Roosevelt upon the low plane upon which le pitches the controversy. It Is entirely possible to credit him with the purest motives and the slncerest patriotism, and Sonora, June Jose Maytorena .authorized the state- ment today that the entire forces under his command would be ueed if necessary to -resist the landing of American ma- rines on the west coaatsto protect for- eign settlers of the Yaqul Valley from Indians now at war. A detachment ,of nearly one thousand troops, lent to the Vwul Valley !3ay, he said, waa dlipatched primarily to protect settlers and their crops from the Indians, but they had orders to re- INDEX TO THE NEWS Washington, June Jo the westi.er forecast: For Galveston and vicinity: Sunday partly- cloudy: light to moderate southerly winds, For Kaat Texas nnd West Texas: Fair and continued warm Sunday and Monday. For Louisiana: Fair Sunday and Monday, GAI.VESTOX. of Mexi- any refugees. Page 1 SOUTH TEXAH WHOLESALE rj orric'ra and adjourn. the Indians, but they had orders to re- .AKSWBHH to ouestlonn ask slst any landing of American military Ncw" Pane sj. due form. Page 8 SCORES OF TEXAS AUTO1STS coming state meet at exposition. Page 7. GERMAN CONFIRMS RE- PORTS SUBMERSIBLE HAMMED BY BRITISH SJL1H'. llf but In the yet resolutely oppose the methods which "mploy ror the entirely.now set of Mexicans a coal" the U, "Avrtiutiiio u, cuan- on, it is expected, of the Villa-Zonntn faction, which has demonstrated Its will- ingness to tnake other ele- wlth the "tner factions VIUa'K Proposal. The agency of the Vlllu-Zapata gov- ernment here gave out the statement tonight: "In following "Mr. Roosevelt might be excluded from the list of the nadlon's advisers on all matters relating to1 peace or war on the ground that he Is so anxious to get into any contest that involves blood-letting that he can not be trusted to deal with any phase of the subject. The prepared- ness which he advocates will provoke authorized Enrique 'c. Llorente Confi- dential agent of the convention govern- ment, to issue this formal declaration: ot bnly Is the Plan of making this nation "a rival of the powers of the old world in military naval would Involve and will be. the offer to meet th element upon a common ground be Immediatl ee govern- increase In expenditures for ships and men, "to ,te continued so long an other nations continue to Increase" He asked If it could be possible that Colonel Hoosevelt was ambitions to bo known to history as having "launched unntiu ur.'rienal'y forces. "The forces at our said the governor, ''are sufficient to afford ample protection to all foreigners and their interests. "There is no necessity for the landing of American marines at Tobari Bay or elsewhere, and If any such landing Is attempted it will bo resisted by every means at my command." I BAVAIilATNB look upon enemy without j deuce of nntuKonlnti SWEDISH OOVEHNMENT ,vli; maintain neutrality Page, 2-1 fti in war zone. Payo 24; STATE. by I- Jnt republic !nileavor to by alr- ADMIEAI'S ORDERS ARE BEOAD Landing of Expeditionary Force In With- in Discretion of Naval Coounander> WitHhlngton Dlnpateh. ALL NAT10NAL1TIBS urKocl to tors, _ j In Europe July Fourth. Pago 14. I ANNIVERSARY- OF FREKDOM is Dy necrops ir. Texas. Page t slrifo :elobratcd June How- ard, commanding the for re- lief of American settlers In the Yaqut Valley, has orders which arc clastic; In fact, he has no orders to land a force. for COURT la at Berlin, June Way of Sayville.__ Included In the news stories given out toduy by the Overseas News Agency is the following: "The German admiralty has published a confirmation of the long standing rumors- that the submarine U-29 was de- stroyed by a British tank steamer, which, flying the Swedish, flag-, rammed tlter submarine after It had been ordered to "German newspapers say It is proof of the British of neutral flags" and that the illegal course followed by ships of commerce compel the commanders of German submarines to consider their own safety first and sink such ships without warning." QEHMANS COMMENT ON U-29 Says Fnte of Weddliccn an Announced by Teuton Admiralty S In.-ITU tf. S. DemamlB ImpoMthle. I Berlin, via London, June 19__Under i the headline of "Weddigen and the American Note." the Kreuz Zeitung in a leading article today resumed considera- tion of submarine warfare. The news- paper declares the fate of the U-29 as announced by the German admiralty demonstrates the danger of first Inves- tigating and then sinking ships alid Rs Helen of Troy, in inmecllntely renewd as evidence of tile tne r'oet's query, inspired by tho far- ea'ders" uf tno conventiu_ famed beauty: "Is this the face that Villa Order to j launohel1 a thousand Governor Maytorena, In anuwer to a i L'nKeil n Vast Annr. te et-1-a.m from Ueneral Villa Mr. Koosevelfs plan Mr Brvan -akc the t. l.i the anfl abovo auccosses would have been much greater confidential agency camo .Piaz. -ombnrdo. secretary of state at Chihuahua, last night and by Instruc- .V'.V; boon com- of the unltea t-tates. r'-i-'- the door, and the deals-nine architect of the system will Eo in and out In uniform with the proud consciousness thab our nation no longer contains mollycoddles or weaklings." Mr. Bryan declared, however, that there no danger of Mr. Ruoevelfs merous fol- clared war on Maytorona's forces, offi- cials think they may meet some op- position if they march to repulse tho American party. Maytorena heretofore has always obeyed tlio orders of Villa, to whom the situation has been explained, and navy department officials don't expect trouble. Landh'.c Admiral Howard's force to res- cue the co'ontsu would in no sanse bo Intervention. There are many precedents for such action. nur an effective reu.cdy to the difficulty towing "when Ita real purpose and he urged the laboring mnn VILLA WAIVTS MKETIWC AT HOMK. country t "aborlns men AMERICANS ARK IN PEACE NOW Sar Conditions Are Qact In the Taa.nl llnve Ceaaed to Molevt On Board U. S. Colorado, Off West Coast of Mexico, via San Diego, June are quiet In the Yadul Valley and no further molestation of Americans by Indiana has been re- ported, according to radiograms received today. Two Americans, according to Admiral PEOPLE IN LmVRIi DISTRICTS of Kansas I' "ThBfefore. th City prepare aealnst floods. 3 render Ineffecti COTTON' IS LESS ACTIVE after quiet wco'k every a and closes Hteudy. Pape WHKAT MARKET finishes weak after eariy (lay Page. 19. STOCKS AUK DCU, am] but few important gains ara made. Paiiii 19. unnonant ARIZONA LATEST DRKADXOUGIrT of tho IlnlteJ Slates, is launched at Brooklyn? Pago 4. TEXAS DELKflATIOK OF ADMEN I: REPORTS of IncrcwInK President PuBe 21. ADMEN OF THE WORLD are t royally popularity of in. ting tomorrow. .Pago .10. THKATKICALS. PROGRAM OF FILMS of dalvcston motion picture, theaters. Page 22. CIVIC ANI> CONTINUED PHOSPERJl'y of South Texas towns is noted, in news reports. Paffo 2C. EDITORIALS. VIBWS OF THI3 E1MTOR on Important news of the drfy. Pago STATE SOCIAI. EVKN-TS and visits for Twins towns during the past woek. i'afiea 31 tu 35. S1.X3TION. scrupl the American demand to our submarine war ship carrying American "s wholly imposslbfe." Rcventlow, the navy critic, "Ft Is a moral duty to extract cverv the submarine Tho war situation of yesterday ll auinmarized by the Associated Press as follows: With the fall of Grodek tho Aiutro- Germans are within seventeen miles ot Lemberg, capital of Gallcla. They havo captured Komarno, twenty .miles south- west of Lemberg. aleo, and havo crossed the Tanew River. This movement to the eastward from Przemysl has been a rapid one for large armies and. although the Russians tmva been ijlven credit for opposing the ad- vance with strong rear guards, the. great masses of their forces have withdrawn, without much fifrhtlng, back to what Is probably considered their strongest de- fensive lines, a short distanr.q east of Grodek, where they hold strongly forti- fied positions on the heights of the chain of lakes and along the marshes partly encircling that territory. Allied Forces Report Gains. In Prance the allied forces report eain; at various points. The French have at last completely surrounded and carried by assault Fond de Buval, a >iar- row ravine east of Lorette Hills. This? position has been defended with despera- tion by the Germans since May 9. When it was finally taken-by the French only a few of the defenders remained. The maze of trenches known as the has also been the scene of heavy fighting, for some of the passages have been taken and retaken several times. The French have captur-.d sev- eral additional German trenches around Souchez and In Alsace have made a con- siderable advance, occupying, amons other places, the town of Metzeral, which the Germans set on fire before their evacuation. From Galltpoli Peninsula comes tha information-.of late date that the British and French.: allies are in possession of only about ten square miles of the south- ern end of the peninsula. The Turks are well fortified and are not only offering- a stubborn resistance to any further ad- vance, but are carrying out determined night attacks witli the bayonet.. Says Attacks Are Itrpnlsed. i According to the German, war office, new Attacks by the French and the Brit- ish on the western front have resulted. In defeats for them. Attempted advances In the Arras region, in Northwestern 'Fra-.ice. near the Belgian border, and'in the The. Germans captured the village of Embur- menll, thirty miles east of Money, but abandoned It after destroying the French defensive works. The Italian ministry of marine an- nounced that Austrian warships attacked the Nortnern Italian coast, near the Aus- trian border, Friday and Saturday, but were driven back by Italian warships. The British admiralty has announced officially that the German submarine U-29. which was sunk the latter part of March, fell a victim to a British war- ship, the name of which Is not disclosed. The presumable reason for this tardy an- nouncement became apparent only when a flood of Berlin editorials. In which it was stated that the U-2B was sunk by a merchant ship, reached London. This being accepted in Germany as a fact it was argued editorially that Germany could not relax one whit her warfare against merchantmen, which might ram or destroy gubmarin.es seeking to search, them before firing a torpedo. At the time the U-20 was sunk It waa' rumored in England that she waa rammed and cut in two by a battleship or dreadnought. U, S, KSTIGnTES AUTHORITIES ItBAR OFFICE TO EN- LIST SOLDIERS liXlH ALLIES OP- ERATED Ijf SAN FRASCISCO. W. D. Cox Ic a  Mind of 1'nlillc. Berlin, June 18. via London, Juno 19 _ A given out by the German admiralty to the effect that the Herman submarine U-30 had been rammed and sunk by a British tank steamer afer San Francisco, Cal., June of tho department of are investi- gating alleged recruiting in California for fie allies In the E-.ii'Opean v.-ir, it was declared today.. The main offlce'oC the supposed recruiti.ig agents Is in San Francisco. Franz Born, consul scneral for Gcr- .many in San Francisco, was said to havo supplied information upon wiich the In- vestigation Is but Bopp denied this story. On good authority It was stated that some of the Investigators had found no trouble in enlisting. John W. Preston, United States attorney, declined to din- cuss the situation. Addressed communications to both Villa and Carranza urginir peace. DENIES MO.VTKHKY Id Sara city In Troopn Arrlvr. eprclal to The News. San Antonio. Tex., June 19__Melciul- Garcln, reprencnlatlve of the eon- llliitlntmllntji Ijiredo. today -r. Heltrnn. -nntliiitlonaiint ronpul in Stn Antonln, denying thnt ilerpy had been evnruftted by rar- TWO PULL I'AdKSI of highly colored comics. SHOT IS PIBED TO STOP SHIP Vnltrn1 Torfeda Boat Dntnr'r Blank Charice to Urine Brtllnll Stranrr. New June torpedo boat tho '-is'Hid Si the 1J-29 which made in i positive form, nnd nn If the Cierm inlrally had conclusive ovldena which to bane Its statement, will, opinion of well Inf-irmed persons iieVc mako deeper on the public '.vnuld almost any other pos- i t Hd- upon OFFICIALS INTERCEPT RECRUITS Sqund 20 EnllMrd In San Prnnef.nco Suy Tliff Are Englishmen, and Proceed. ,.cajilMln U'cddlgen, the comnmnder of the U-29. was a popular hero In y, r.inklng I army lender, t and win Allowed to uroevtd. Chicctro.' 111., June Federal offi- cials today Intercepted a squad of twen- ty-six recruits for the British army, hound from San Francisco to New York They were headed by Lieutenant Ken- neth who da Id lie wan on his way to .Entrlnnd to rejoin his regimeiif. After being inken to tho federal bulking and questioned, the men con- tlnuod east. Government agents nt Now York and Detroit were notified of their movements. Federal ngentii armed wUh warranta charging violations of neutrality lawa by enlistment in Um army of a enl nation met the mer. on tfcelr atrlvnl. Tho men nil denied they haft onllnted and warrants were nr.rved. All IJngllihmeh. Kilvvard gualtrouKli of Liverpool "f the moil, tolil tlu- offlcl-ilj, thnt n. llrlllun Francleco shipping to d   

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