Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

El Paso Herald Post: Monday, October 19, 1936 - Page 8

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   El Paso Herald Post (Newspaper) - October 19, 1936, El Paso, Texas                                 El Paso Herald-Post  ¿I siLKJPPb-HOlVARD NtWbPAFLK WAJLLACE PERRY ...............  taitoi  Ol'f »iii‘0 ilt' Penpt* Wr/< Pino Then Own Way“  Puuushea catty, except sunoay oj I’he Heralcj-PoM Pnoji^nn v Co., a: Mills ana Kama* Sts,. E !  Paso Tex Cnlertc at El Pa* 0  nostoiftce »eccrrt cla 1 ^ matter. ReElsiradr como amcmo de 2a c)?*e. en la Ad-minlstracion fleCcrreos deC Juares’ Chih con techi- 27 de AOrji d(- 1931  rELEPHON* MATN 6600  lenits.-i ii Unfea Press Asswj-ited Press. Scrlpps-Howard Newspaper Alliance NEA Service New»-paper Information Service. Aiidn Bureau of Circulation Assoclateo Pre.v« 1* exctn^HPtv entltleo io "or reo'ibMcaf ion ol all new? dispatcher cfedited t-c U. or not otherwise credited tn t.hi.' paper: also, the ioca) news DsibUsheH therein  The Herald wa* ertabllsheo lr> 1881. tfte Post Id 1922  MONDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1938  What People?  HEP. GEO. MOFFETT of Chillicothe, author of the proposed constitutional amendment which seeks to limit legislative representation from Texas’ larger cities, argues that this amendment is “by far the most needful” among the six to be voted on next month—“to keep the government in the hands of all the people and not the few who have moved to the cities. 1 ’  But that’s just what he’s trying to prevent—letting “the people” have any-• thing much to say about the activities of the Texas Legislature.  For more than six years, he and his political running mates from the smaller and more backward counties have blocked legislative redistricting in Texas —a legislative act which the Texas Constitution plainly requires “must be” done every 10 years.  We haven’t had a legislative redistricting since 1921, the year folic 'ing the  1920    census.  In the meantime, many of the more aggressive communities in Texas have forged forward in population.  Among th^se are El Paso, Lubbock, San Angelo, Amarillo, Dallas, San Antonio and Houston.  Many West Texas oil field towns, not even on the map in 1920, have become populous centers.  But the smaller and more backward counties of the State had a majority in the Legislature on the basis of the  1921    redistricting bill. Their representatives didn’t want to surrender that legislative control. And they have been ignoring the plain provisions of the Texas Constitution so they cpuld keep it.  They don’t want “the people”—a majority of them—to rule; they want minority rule in the State.  And now—after Ignoring the Constitution for more than six years; in refusing a new districting bill based on the 1930 census—they’re going a step farther in their effort to preserve minority rule in TexasT they want to make it so that folks living in Texas’ really largest cities won’t have more than one-third ‘ the voice of those living in smaller towns and rural communities.  The plan won’t succeed, though, if the people really understand what’s back of their scheming.  Horse Feather*  CENATOR VANDENBERG’S quarrel ^ with the Columbia Broadcasting system and Woody Hockaday’s showering of Father Coughlin with peace feathers seem somehow to fit into the same picture. Both were • appropriate skits in the political campaign’s jittery windup.  And if Columbia’s officials, surprised by the Senator’s trick of staging a mock interview with phonograph records of President Roosevelt’s past statements, were made to appear awkward when they first ruled the Senator off the air and then let him go on, there was no less comedy in the scene at Detroit where Coughlin and his followers collared Woody as a “Communist and New Dealo-crat.”  Columbia’s embarrassment was Van-denberg’s gain, tor it gave his performance much more publicity than it otherwise would have received. And now the Republicans of course, will attempt to capitalize the radio company’s start-and-stop censorship of a broadcast which broke a company rule, and to carry the episode to a hilarious conclusion by charging that it is part of a New Deal-Moscow plot to gag free speech.  Incidentally, it will be interesting to see the final public reaction to this latest device in campaigning wherein phonographic excerpts are employed to build up one end of a political “debate,” Since the excerpts are selected by the one who possesses the human voice and since a phonographic record possesses no capacity for rebuttal, the human half seems to hate a natural advantage to the point qf playing a cinch in the matter of who comes out the hero. The public verdict may be that the stunt was clever; and again it may be that it was too clever.  Meanwhile Woody was last heard of in the custody of officers of the law who couldn’t decide what to do with him since the police regulations fail to mention whether feather-tossing is a high crime, a misdemeanor or just a lark.  ^ ^ ^ ^  All Is Vanity  pvON’T let all of these crucial issues and vital causes get you down. If the political campaign just seems to go ’round and ’round and come out nowhere, write it down as being in harmony with the rhythm of life, concerning which the Pi Line columnist of The Albuquerque Tribune chronicles:  “You work all day doing about the same things and getting about the same money in order to write about the same check to the grocer and the landlord and you g;o home and eat about the same supper arid hear about the same radio jokes and get into the same bed and sleep in the same way in order to get up and shave the same face in the same way in order to look the same at the same office doing the same thing?’  For the Greater Good  jyiANY of us are going to vote for Roosevelt or Landon because we are Democrats or Republicans or because we do or don’t like the way a WPA project down the street is being managed.  World trade, currencies and governmental relationships—they seem far removed from our daily lives.  So it is something of an awakener when a man of James P. Warburg’s standing speaks out and says that those seemingly remote matters make all the difference in the world to our own future well-being and liberties, and that all of our much-debated domestic issues are but trifles by comparison.  It is not that Mr. Warburg dwells in an intellectual stratosphere above our local squabbles. Few others have been more in the heat of the battle; few others have been as vigorous, uncompromising or effective in criticism of the New Deal domestic program. For three years the author of “Hell Bent for Election” called incessantly for the defeat of Roosevelt and those policies.  Yet, now, at the last hour, Mr. Warburg suddenly announces that he will vote for Roosevelt. He has not, he says, changed ainy of his decided opinions of the fallacies of the Irew Deal program at home. But a vastly more important issue has entered the campaign, an issue brought into being by the Republican leaders’ narrow partisan criticism of the Administration’s success in the direction of currency stabilization and world trade revival.  So, turning his back on his Wall Street associates and waving aside what he considers comparatively minor differences with the Roosevelt 'Administration, Mr. Warburg writes to Secretary Hull that international economic co-operation “transcends all the many apparent issues, Which, no matter how important in themselves, can be met only if we meet the one basic issue squarely.”  “National self-sufficiency,” he con-tihues, “means a permanent Government-directed economy; and a permanent Government-directed economy means at length dictatorship; moreover, economic nationalism sooner or later means War; this has been and is your view, and those to whom the preservation of the American fo*m of government and the American way of life is more than a mere phrase share your views and are happy to observe your successful efforts.”  He had expected the opposition would “stand four-square against; wrong policies and wrong premises,” and would endorse “the basic principle for which you stand,” he says, but—  “Unfortunately, the Republican platform and the Republican campaign— openly attack this principle at the very time when the present Administration is approaching it more closely. To attack the principle is to attack the fundamental basis of all liberty and all liberalism ...  “It is impossible for me to support an opposition which either will not or cannot recognize that economic nationalism lies at the root of our great difficulties —an opposition which, clinging to outworn partisan tradition, offers oply to repeat the mistakes of the past as a cure for the mistakes of the present.”  Hugh Johnson Says:  We Stuck Our Neck Out In Europe to Avenge Belgium as Much as for Any Other Reason—and Look What We Got For It.  Are Kids Immature?  ONE WOMAN'S Ot'lNtON  By MRS. ALTER FERGUSON “iv/HAT I can’t understand,” said my next door W neighbor, “is how a generation that is so sophisticated can remain so immature.” We were discussing the college group in which our youngsters ran.  “That’s because they’ve had so little responsibility,” was the solution offered by a friend with two girls in the university. “Our children are so immature because they have been protected, and while they mimic the mannerisms and expressions of the knowing, they are actually babes in the wood when it comes to having any actual knowledge of life.”  What do you think? In our group there were as many opinions as there were women.  Qne dare not generalize too much about juveniles these days. While they have in common the virtues and shortcomings familiar to all young things, their environment, the circumstances of their existence, have a great deal to do with their behavior and mental attitudes.-As for me, youngsters have always appeared more admirable than their elders, although there’s no denying the fact that we have many groiips who do show immaturity in their attitudes toward life.  But how about the thousands of middle-aged men and women who have never grown up either? They exist in a perpetual state of peevishness. Their emotional unbalance plunges them from one disaster into another. Athough their yeará are *many, they have not acquired any wisdom with their passing. They -suffer from what the psychologists call “infantilism.” During the recent depression I met any number of boys and girls who seeméd remarkably able to meet and overcome financial disaster, and who, after such disaster, adjusted them-seJves expertly to the changed conditions of their lives. In all respects, they were fine, even noble. Others, as is natural, were less capable. They needed help; were filled with fears, and suffered nervous collapse. Their courage was weaker.  Sometimes young people who have lived sheltered lives, existing, as it were, in the upholstery of their parents’ care and love, are apt to ^remain immature for a long time. There is no occasion for them to be otherwise. However, I imagine if the occasion should arise, most of them would react with courage. After all, we never know how capable our children are until they are put to the test. Sophistication, of course, is not an evidence of maturity. Quite the opposite, in fact. But if I had the money to place bets. I'd risk it gladly on the youth of this generation.  - THEN AN!) NOW --  By HUGH S. JOHNSON  \ JEW YORK, Oct. 19.—The chances seem good i ^ for hearing a great deal more about “poor little Belgium” again. We fall pretty easily for the “poor little” stuff. In 1901 our sympathies were all with the poor little Japs while they were walking around big Russia like a copper round a barrel. The smoke had hardly drifted away when we found an aggressive enemy looming in the Pacific—perhaps our greatest danger in all the world today.  Without the atrocities against “poor lutle Belgium” in 1914-1916 this country couldn’t have been kicked into the World War. It made no difference to us that “frightfulness'’ as a deliberate and systematic war measure was something invented by Sherman and Sheridan in the last two years of our Civil War when the latter “fixed the Shenandoah valley so that a crow couldn't fly over it without carrying its rations,” and Sherman set out to convince Georgia that "war is hell.”  We stuck our neck out in Europe to avenge Belgium as much as for any other reason—and look what we got for it. We fed the Belgians and they fed the Germans.  « * *  It is fine to sympathize with Belgium—and remain 3000 miles away. It lies in the immemorial path of European conquest. Its soil is stratified with layers of dead soldiers’ bones since history began to speak. When its king compares its desired neutrality to that of mountainous'Switzerland, it is inept as comparing a concrete highway to a stone wall. Belgium is literally between the upper and nether millstones in any European war.  Whenever France has attacked Germany, she has nearly always taken this trail. Whenever tribes east of the Rhine reached out for France, they came this way. Napoleon said: “Antwerp is a pistol pointed at the heart of England.” His Waterloo came in Belgium. His figure of speech about England is even more apt in the modern war of aircraft. Whether viewed from the German, French or British angle, Belgium is the greatest strategical problem on earth.  In the World War the “sure-fire” Scniefiin plan of a surprise attack by an unprecedented “left-wheel” through Belgium failed of the most spectacular accomplishment in all warfare only because the kaiser got coid feet over east Prussia. It was not because of Belgian resistance behind the forts at Liege. But modern fortifications of the French Maginot type, adequately armed and manned are believed by contemporary experts to be impregnable. .  * * *  This may be an explanation of the young king’s sudden move. W^h “collective security” dissolving everywhere—with France weakening and “going'communist,” Germany strengthening and wholly fascist; England arming and all the world threatening war on unprecedented and unpredictable alignments—should conservative Belgium be committed in advance to a possible “popular front” alliance—or, indeed, to any alliance?  If an extension of the Maginot line can protect Belgium from the east, a capitalist .France has not greatly to fear another Schiefflin thrust. On the contrary, with an impregnable, neutral, capitalist Belgium on her left flank and an impregnable, neutral, capitalist Switzerland on the right, she would be reasonably safe as a “centerist” or “right-wing” nation.  On the other hand, if France goes red. Belgium’s defense against France might be to open her back door and the road to the heart of France to fascist Germany.  The situation is still obscure, but it at least plainly means this: Faith in “security” through treaties, leagues, ententes and alliances is fading rapidly. Internationally the cry is: “Every man for himself—save himself who can.”  THE WINNER!  By Rodger, San Francisco News  Fair 'Enough  Welcome to New Italian Envoy, But Waiving Usual Compliments, How About That Dough They Owe?  N’  Lest We Forget  OCTOBER, 1932 Per capita annual income of wage earners in selected industri ; estimated by Department of Commerce at $901.  M a v o r McKee proposed salary cuts for New York employes in pres e nti nr ai.nuai budget.  Soeony Vacuum Corp. put employes on five-day week, cutting pay in proportion.  By WESTBROOK PEGLER  EW YORK, Oct. 19.—Mussolini has sent us a new ambassador named Fulvio Suvich and the diplomatic set will be molting calling cards ah over Washington for a couple of weeks. But, when the social rites are over and Mr. Suvich pulls up his chair to Cordell Hull’s and starts to purr, I trust that Mr. Hull will fetch him a stout jab on the top button of his fancy vest with a firm and demanding finger and put the question, “What about that dough?”  ^Mr. Suvich may shoot his cuffs and pull his mustache until it is stretched out like the antlers on a lobster but that will not answer the question, “What about that dough?”  Mr. Suvich may roll his eyes anc} blow kisses at the chandeliers.putting on the old number one routine about the beauty of American womanhood and the vigor and youthfulness of our great new country but that will not answer the question, “What about that dough?”  « * *  And certainly it is to be hoped that they will steer Mr. Suvich away from the grave of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington because other foreign diplomats in times past have visited this national shrine only for the purpose of softening us up. Henceforth, when the representative of some dead beat nation wants to make a solemn visit and'drop a wreath it would be more fittihg to lead him to the Treasury or the Archives Building and show him those rubber checks, all tied up with ribbon and smelling of lavender which they wrote for us so long ago. They remind us that they are all alike in the respect that we have to buy their friendship by the slice and that if it comes to a showdown we haven’t got a friend in the world.  *    JS*    #  True, we have been told that it would be bad for us to be paid in full all the money we sent to Europe. If they attempted to pay us* in goods tomorrow we would have to use the Navy to chase away their cargo boats lest the dumping of all this goods result in the closing of all our own industries, complete unemployment and poverty and chaos amid plenty. If they sent us gold, that, too, would do something to the exchange rate and nobody would ever be able to buy anything from us and a store without customers must go out of business.  Sure, I .know, but if the money they owe this country can buy roads and public buildings, bridges, modern apartment houses, create railroad stations and armament for them then certainly the same money should be able to buy a few knick-knacks for us. Up to now we have never had a chance to see what it would do and Mr. Suvich, on his arrival in Washington the other day, said any discussion of the debt would still be premature, indicating that debts mature very slowly In Italy.  « * *  I think our people would be willing to suffer a little from the dire effects of too much wealth if some payment on account would serve to reduce the armaments of the countries which are using our money to promote another war. We would be willing to stand the pain in the interests of world peace and, any way, we .are a very j ignorant lot in this country who invariably won-  THE FENCE  A Newspaper So Thoroughly independent It Takes No Stand On Any Issue  By DR. B. U. L. CONNER  SOCIETY column note in Saturday’s Hailoiled-Pest: “H. A. Michael, Hairoiled-Pest city editor, has just completed a course in ballroom dancing.”’’ Asked if that was so, Mister Michael, interviewed a t t h e State liquor tax office at the bridge, said, “Yes, that’s so.” **  ¥ ¥ if The interviewer persisted:  “At your age why?”  “At my age, because,” Mister Michael said, “I've known for years I got around the dance floor with difficulty. I decided to find out why?”  “Why?”  “Because I never did learn the mechanics of body movement, as applied to the ratio of the music, and the lady’s general geometry. Dancing is a matter of angles, not curves.” # ^ #  “What do you mean again?”  “Most dancers who dance in the fashion that I once done, seemed to have no purpose on the dance floor. They go around in circles.”  “What did you find out about that?”    •  “That one goes this way or that way, never just this way.; In other words, one must have his mind made up as to where he, is going to lead the lady and lead her there. He must know the exact tempo of the music and keep step with it on all occasions. His movement must be perfectly natural and relaxed, and  that he must know how to put his thumb, in the lady’s kidney.”  # v  “What do you mean by that?^  “The slightest pressure of a crook ed thumb on the lady’s kidney makes her follow you with the slightest provocation, though she does not know why.”  “Can that sort of thing possibly go on and on?”  “And often on and on/*  BARK CIRCLES  ; In the living room, the tall, tanned man, lazily smoked a cigar, his feet stretched out before him.  She.had made up to look her best, but he seemed only mildly interested. ,  She felt a little nonplussed and murmured to herself; “Why the ——-can't I upset him without so much fuss? (To be continued.)  THINKING OUT LOUD  Contributions From Berald-Post Readers  OCTOBER, 193f  Same department estimated annual income of workers in 1935 at $1117. Wages have gone continually upward in 1936.  General Electric Co. I der when Mussolini starts bragging of how much  agreed to adjust wages and salaries of its Schenectady employes upward in accordance with cost-of-living index.  money he has and how many planes and guns and warships he has bought why any man who is so boastful of his country's honor doesn't pay a little something on her honest debts. Greetings to the new Italian ambassador and, waiving mil compliments on the New York skyline and the beauty of our women and a 10-dollar wreath bought with our money, What about that dough?  Mexican Politeness  THINKING OUT LOUD: *  Letter to Thinking Out Loud, issue, of Oct, 14, by Alice "Horton, of Las Cruces, N. M., was read by me, and no doubt by mainy thousands of others of Mexican descent or nationality in this Community and elsewere.  Her unjustified attack on letter by William Bannering, of Richmond, Va., which appeared in your issue of the 10th., in which he so kindly expressed his impressions with regard to Latin-Americans on the recent attempt by the head of the local health department to classify births and deaths of same under the colored denQmination,. makes me wonder just what motivates here intolerant attitude.  She questions first of . all the possibility that there be other American Anglo-Saxons (so called) who may be  ? as broadminded and cultured as Mr.-Bannering proves to be. In many years of residence in the U. S., I feel proud to say that 1 have been fortunate enough in meeting many such people and' cherish a host of friends among them. I have known many of the others also, of course, but have relegated them in my estimation to the place to which they are entitled.  I could see ho attempt to belittle his countrymen in any way in his letter but on the „contrary he showed, as I have said before, that there are many people of culture among them, as there are in any other nationality.  There are unfortunately Mexicans just as uncultured as any other people, .who are not above displaying prejudice and discrimination. Must we judge all Mexicans be-  cause of them? Could it not be barely possible that there may exist a few who are a little bit more cultured and do not feel this way? There seems to be one, at least, as evidenced by his letter appearing, next to yours in the same edition of The Post. I refer to the one signed S. 1. Esquivel. He happens to be personally known to me, arid I would like to know a more gentlemanly and truly cultured person.  That there, has been prejudice and discrimination between the less educated factions of both Americans and Mexicans, Cannot be dented. My only hope is that education among both will eventually .destroy such'a condition.  I had never hèard that one could be too polite in dealing with one’s social equal. I would certainly admire a- person who, even if despising another, can find it possible to be “super-polite” to him.  May the future permit the lady in question more contact with that portion of the Mexican ' people with whom she evidently is not very well acquainted, and it may be that she. will change her very strong feeling against them all.  JOAQUIN L. VELARDE,  1101 Upson, Apt. 2.  * * ♦  Mrs. Eminger  THINKING OUT LOUD:  When I am dead, my dearest, sing no sad songs lor me ;  Plant thou no roses at my feet, nor shady cypress tree.  Be green the grass above me, with flowers and dewdrops wet,  And if' thou wilt, remember; and if thou canst, forget.  Such, I believe, would be the request of the dear woman, gifted musical artist, who today lies in her last resting place.  It does not seem possible it is she, so full of health, so strong, so help-  ful, giving joy at every turn in life; giving' smiles and laughter, giving sympathy where there was, need of it always,  Mrs. Gus Eminger was a combination of womanly qualities rarely met. She was the feminine head' of a fine ranch in the Upper Valley. She was a hard working aftist, vocal and at the. piano, and conducted and trained a group of troubadour singers, giving concerts for, club and other affairs up and down the valley. She was a most loving mother, and 1 never saw her as ecstatic as when telling me of holding in her arms her first grandchild.  She was a native Iowa, daughter of District Judge Crandell at near Council Bluffs. I have seen her portrait and eulogistic biographical sketch in the leading newspaper of that city. Iowa was proud indeed of this capable daughter.  Mrs. Eminger was an outstanding figure in the women’s clubs of New^ Mexico. She gave her artistic services as freely as God had given them to her. She was a teacher of rank in the public schools of her vicinity.  Spread on her roses, roses.  But never a spray of dew;  , In silence she reposetf,  And would that I did, too.  MARTHA Y1RGINIA BURTON * * «  Sweet Charity  THINKING OUT LOUD:  I dig up forty cents per week,  You put up forty, too;  Thus in the name of charity A lot of good we do.  Add forty cent« for one whple year— You'll see we're giving plenty;  Unless 1 am mistaken now The sum 1* ov'ter twenty. «Bucks).  Now multiply this trifling sum By fifty ‘'grand” or more,  Then you’ll begin to realize What, we are doing for the “poor.”  NAT CAMPBELL.  It Seems to Me  Knickerbocker Greys Stand Between Nation and Chaos. Children in Military Garb.  By HEYWOOD BROUN  WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS. W. Va., Oct. 19.—News from New York is reassuring, and we need not tremble lest the alien come down like a wolf upon the gold. America as we know it still continues, for the Knickerbocker Greys have begun once more to drill, and this is the fifty-sixth year of what is possibly Manhattan's most patriotic institution.  The paper says, “This junior military organization included in the roster the scious of many of the best known families in New York.” One hundred and ten veterans appeared and thirty-eight recruits. The veterans vary between 9 and 16, while the reciuit, lun from 7 to 10. They will drill twice a week all through the yeaj-, and then medals will be awarded for attendance, military proficiency and marksmanship.  What! No plaque for the 10-year-old tot who shows the greatest prowess with the bayonet? And will there be no opportunity to drop to-y bombs as close as possible to toy hospitals?  ran a country jake newspaper in a Michigan burg, now has a twin-motored plane to commute from his offices in Rockefeller Center for week-ends at his ranch in New Mexico. Heigh ho!  « £ ft  Study in wistfulness: Marc Connelly gazing at a window display of imported hair brushes in a Madison Avenue shop.  By o. o. McIntyre  W YORK, Oct. 19.—Diary: A hail from Valentine Williams, the London tale writer. And a posy from Bob Davis and a snapshot of Bob Ripley in I£hyber Pass. Also notes from Mrs. Harry Houdini and Cole Porter. And Ethel Roche came in a moment to say goodbye against her seasonal journel to Palm Beach.  So talking to Harry Burton’s secretary. B. J. Hawley, who has cached in a capable head as much literary information as any one 1 know', j George Marshall, the Washington And word I had been given honor- j laundry tycoon, was the chicf back-ary membership, formerly held by j er for the new million dollar auto Jerome K. Jerome, in the Interna- j racing course, the Roosevelt Race-tional Mark Twain Society.    ¡way, at Westbury, L. I., near the  Dinner at the Colony and car- j scene of the Vanderbilt cup races, riaged Dick Berlin and Nancy White! And thus the vivacious fellow who through the park and to see the j has been upholding the Broadway feather-like tracery of Washington j playboy traditions the past few Bridge in the moonshine. Then to 1 years emerges with the label of see the last act of "White Horse j sportsman. Marshall, no relation Tavern” again, a spectacle 1 liked j but a look-alike of Herbert Maras well as “The Great Waltz.” ; shall, has a flair for speed whether * * *    he is making the rounds of the  Flying FuxnididdlesI Ait Kudner, (night clubs or throwing one of his  an ace advertising man who once dawn breakfasts The venture will  be a new avenue for his talents.  * + *  Personal nomination for the most unpredictable of the theatrical producers—Jed Harris.  * » 4  Bagatelles; Jock Whitney's valet Edgar is also pilot of his plane . . . Lenore Ulric is writing her memoirs as a Belasco star . , . Morton Downey was such a hit in London he may go there permanently . . , Chic Sale loafs around soda fountains even when he comes to New York . . . Jack Pearl was born in the house where Horatio Alger wrote many of his novels.  Hi H- H>  I met an apple knocker in white sox near the Public Library lions today. “Pard.” he said, “where is that there Umpire Building?” I would have enjoyed shucking off the yoke for the day to do the town with that bird.  (Copyright, 193«, McNaught Syndicate)  I must have heard of the Knickerbocker Greys before, but when I suddenly came upon the story with a photograph of a spindly little boy saluting a beefy man in a Sam Browne belt it almost hit me like a war atrocity. I though “I ought to be able to get mad about this and do a good column,” but it hasn’t worked out that way. I’m puzzled. I read the names of the ladies who form the board c_ directors of the Knickerbocker Greys. They are all good names-—the same names you would see in any “Save America” list— these are the very ladies who hold benefits for the Red Cross and put stained glass windows In the big church of Bishop ' Manning. And I haven’tva doubt that every last one of, them would like to see a happy and a prosperous world with ease and contentment both upstairs and down. ■  Anid so I wonder what comes into their minds on a drill day. “Fraùlein, will you please go up to the nursery arid tell Master Freddie that it’s time for. him to go to the armory and drill. And tell him not to forget his gas mask. And, oh,* Fraulein, be sure that his hands are clean.”  And so brushed,and scrubbed and his fingernails cut, Freddie is off for the armory to learn about military tactics and master rifle fire. Cadet Colonel Lowell Thomas Jr., who is all of 14, will probably not take thè, recruits much beyond elementary military routines for the first few days. The whole crowd is keen and eager as mustard, but they must wait a while before they smell, gun powder.  ,* * •  It may be many months before one ' hears marked sounds of grief from. Freddie'3 room, and the manly lad s* mother is forced to make Excuses to her tea-time visitors. “I’m so sorry,” . she explains, “but Freddie is such a patriot that he takes everything very hard. Oh, yes, he belongs to the Knickerbockef Greys. Some of them are younger than Freddie, but they treat them all as if they were grownup soldiers. I always say there’s nothing like military drill-to make a boy manly. Well, it seems they were' having riot drill today and Freddie’s bayonet got stuck in the stomach of his rioter. Yes, they have dummies packed with sawdust. I think they pack them too tight. That’s why Freddie *ouldn’t get the bayonet out.  “And you see it held up his entire squad. They were attacking the rioters front four sides arid driving them into a narrow alley where the gas detachment could work on them. It’s all a game, of course. But they have judges and score cards, and some of • the boys do get so excited. My husband says it’s just like a real riot, and hé says that when we. train enough of our well-bred, boys we’ll show people there isn’t any. class consciousness in America.  “But I had to send Freddie to l>ed without any supper, I just couldn’t get him to stop crying. It seems his pride is hurt, He had to call on the corporal to help him get the rioter off his bayonet. I suppose there’s no good scolding him. He probably inherited it from me. Freddie is just too sensitive for his own good, and the sawdust does make your hands so dirty.”  FORTY YEARS AGO  (From The Herald Files of Oei. 19> 1890)*  / It was learned in El Paso today that a bicycle tire has been invented in which feathers were used. It is contended that when a puncture occurs the first tendency, is for the down to be «arHed up into the puncture by the pressure of the air on the inside.  * * •  TWENTY-FIVE YEARS A'lO  (From The Herald Files of Oct. ID, 1911)  Gov. O. B. Colquitt of Texas and his staff arrived in El Paso today and were received by J. G. McNary, president of the Chamber of Commerce, and other El Pasoans.  * • *  A 20 minute car schedule has been installed on the Fort Bliss car line. * * *  This morning from 4:30 to 5:30 there appeared in the eastern sky a spectacle, considering the beauty of its tracings and delicate surroundings, makes man’s effort in the line of display tame indeed. The combination consisted of Venus, the comet and the moon.  . * 0 *  TEN YEARS AGO  (From The Post File* of Oct. 19, J&20)  Laskey Film Co. stars who have been making a movie feature, “Wings,” at San Antonio passed through here today.  * » *  Work of closing the only opening in the county levee began today when construction of a waste-way in the A.scoret bend was started.  * • •  Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Miller, 4223 Chester St., are rejoicing over a baby daughter,- Mary Madeline.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication