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Denton Record Chronicle Newspaper Archive: September 18, 1939 - Page 1

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Publication: Denton Record Chronicle

Location: Denton, Texas

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   Denton Record-Chronicle (Newspaper) - September 18, 1939, Denton, Texas                                M ROUND ABOUT TOWN And they spoke unto him, saying "Km wilt be a servant unto this this day, ana will, serve and answer them, and speak ,eood words to them, then they will Kt thy servants forevcr.-I Kinks The new wage and hour scale of "PA, approved by Congress some !l'ne ago, may cause slight delay some of the construction work P according to Mayor Lee Preston Even though Hie projects we approved before the new law fiS city has been notl- that 1Js provisions will affect ac work. Some revisions will be necessary, Under the. law. longer weeks are required of WPA the ttrger allowance for materials. DENTON RECORD-CHRONICLE VOL. XXXIX XO. 30 DENTOA1. TEXAS, MONDAY AFTERNOON, SEPTEMBER IS, 1939 "It looks like the up ncre oil business says W. r, r v. VY It Scherle, local geologist, who has much to do with promoting explorations in IJenton County. now one is being drilled m the Bolivar section where oil gas were discovered months and material Is being placed the ground for another test. Hugher Cannon are drilling a on the Dr. Charles Saunders about 330 feet northwest of test made old Crow place years ago which was saia to have had good oil showings. i ins hole was about 1.25Q feet deep morning. Boots Lewis has the derrick on the ground and was "fporlod to be assembling machin- "L ?r a test formerly peta by the Bolivar Drilling Com- pany on the Knox land, about 1 000 Germany and Soviet Russia Give Hint of Intentions To G; -i J Small Buffer State Associated Press Leased Wire EIGHT PAGES Wounded by War in Warsaw, Claim Purpose Is to Bring Peace For Polish Nation. MOSCOW, Sept. and Soviet Russia today gave what was inter- preted as a strong hint of in- tentions to create a Polish buffer state small ____ when their invading: armies finish conquering Poland. A joint Soviet-German communi- que was issued'declaring the intcn- Uon of their armies was to help the Polish people "reconstruct con- ditions of their slate existence." "These troops do not pursue any Ray. son of Mr. and Mrs aims are against, the inter- ol Krum. and first grandchild! Kts of Germany or the U. S. S R. Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Barns of m the spirit and letter of Demon, has U living grandparents the Soviet German non aggression V j believe it or not." Thc child was pact-" lnc communique. lorn in ti: northwest of the big gasscr was brought in years ago. over two e Deuton Hospital Sat- urday evening, and its mother for- mission of the is to bring order and peace to Poiand." was Miss Geneva Barns The tTne official German news paternal grandparents are Mr. and I cy iMued a substantially similar Mrs. J. S. Boydston of Krum. Great m Berlin.) craiidparents are Mr. and Mrs. S. Thc communiciue was broad- ly Boydston of Krum and Mr. and cas' Russian radio stations .Mrs. J, A. Thompson of Denlon.I35 Soviet troops moved deeper into Mrs. R. S. Barns and Mrs C. S. L Buckingham of Denton are great- frandmothers, and Mrs. Elizabeth ttcydston of Dccatur is a great- creat-grandmolhcr. making the to- tal of n living grandparents. M. A. Gay. Denton roofing Poland. Sweep In lo Pot-ma MOSCOW, Sept. The Red armies of Soviet Russia swept deeper Into war-weakened Poland from the eau today as diplomatic circles predicted the buffer-stale Welles Wiggles Thumb Long Time Before Getting Ride NEW YORK. Sept. Orson Welles niggled lib thumb for nearly a half hour today en one of America's most crowd- ed highways but not one pass- ing tourist oilered the hitch- hiking actor a lift. Welles, whose mimic war broadcast a year ago caused panics all over the country, was trying to catch a, plane for Hol- lywood from Newark, N. J when his taxi broke down. He had grown a new beard for the movies which probably didn't help him any In trying to win Ihe sympathies o! pass- ing motorists. Finally the drhcr of a gar- bage truck took pity on him but he caught the plane only because its departure was rte- seven minutes, for anoth- er cause. C. V. Mitchell, about. 21, cmtralm- cr for a McKir.nty undertaking parlor, was killed about 7 p m. Sunday ni Lake Dallas when he dived Into .-hallow waler ami suf- fered a broken neck. Tile tragedy came ns he. his wife, and another young McKinney mur- rled couple, virtually life-long friends, jienred Uie end of an after- I noon of beating and swiinniinj; at I he lake. Jn Iheir boat. Ihe quartet had Bone tci a small island several htm- (ircd -yards northeast of Hundley Beat i Works, when tiic accident happened. 'Others Were The.McKinney friend and the two women had left thr boat and were wading mil to dccB.r wattr to swii II1HEFIS ROOSEVELT INVITES G. 0. P. HEAiSTOCONFERENCEOVER U. S. NEUTRALITY PROGRAM Alf M. Landon and Frank Knox Summoned to Washington Wednesday; Message to Con- gress Not Yet Written. WASHINGTON, (AP) -President Roosevelt has muvitetl former Governor Alf M. Landon of Kansas and Frank Knox of the titular heads of the Republican to a While House parley Wednesday at which leaders 01 the natoii will consider America's neutrality program. T. Early, a presidential secretary, said Mr. Roosevelt had p, talked with Landon and Knox by I telephone last night and said they I had accepted the invitation, I j-v TX Early said Representative Mapcs I II U A (Til (R-Mich.l, ranking minority mem- ber of the house rules and Inter- state commeree committees, also i had been asked to the meeting. i 'llie president arranged fof (lie I conference a (lay Congress meets in special session to consider I _ T I 'r> ;o Program WASHINGTON, Sept 18 Denton deputy sheriffs' ir.vcstigu- (Icns of a week-end series of tire which resulted ill arre.sts in Dallas last week-end, today were following out ramifications of the case spread- ing cut across Central when Mitchell stood in" the beat j was leading west to publicans' or Democrals' ana dived, with the apparent intpn- Wcalhciiord and Mineral Wells, i The presidential lion of swimming out to join them. He did not reappear at the surface of the water. cast lo Corsicana. In addition to the three men rested by Dallas oiliccrs 1 partisan leaders In the national i ljo> Bnd NJ'e (R-NDI predicted to- legblnlure. The addition of Lan- y thej' to Sfn- don and Knox. which went outside nle Republicans as a group ol CfYigre.ss. was underslcod to be iPrcsldcnt Roosevelt's proposal to In the nature cl further attempting K'Kt" tne embargo against arms to bury partisanship and ralltlcs warring nations. is 1 Although the Senators were si- lent, persons close lo them said there was no doubt they would try to obtain an endorsement, from a majority at n. party conference, of their stand for retention of the embargo. Borah nnd Nye contend the sale of arms lo France and Great Brit- durtng Ihe prcsenl Early said the president told him Icday --Ihis is no time to call any of those wiio will tnke part 111 "-isv: secretary said (he meeting would begin al 2 p. m. The1 friend, alarmed, hurried back'cai Friday, two more arid found Miicliell. under waler I >vcre "l tlle Dallas anrt unconscious; in a minutes conl'tction wllh thcc; _. He managed to lift him into the j a slulli had (em- boat and there besan artificial res- for questioning, Dcn- :e men ar- (CS) Wednesday and Oiat Secretary' to Trance and Great Brit- i sit in, probably as f _step toward two more men j me only cabinet member county jail in Early replied with a firm "no" to by Monday a q-jwufon about whether Ihe deci- sion to ask Landon ar.d Knox, the eventual involvement of this coun- try In war. The two senators were represent- ed as believing they could convince ntjytiut.cjll piratiou attempts, meanwhile shout- "'5 Roy Moore and Mark I prcsidcnlinl ing fof'help I .naniinh .said. RciinbKcan inesldcnliai "and" vice- i colleagues they would, candidates in 193S thinE to on- rVlA- nroelftAnf cfloits.lo revive the victim were fu- tile, because of the neck injury In I ambulance [rom the McKhmey firm Icr whom Mitchell workcrt was called ..lo take the body home. Coroner's Verdict Returned (ractor, who sustained "eated afler the World War would ics while at work in Hallas recent- I divided again between its t is able to be on tlie invaders one am, and ..verafrTbl, .Word from (he Red army M and Sk" wS "f t Ctaud Alrcd-nn-d associates, Bob roiter, Elmer Shahan and R. W I Propofcd as as Poland's' Owens, with their hounds caugilt i fale is determined. returned with Iwo wheels identified might be interpreted, as a move in coalition or bl- uM His face twisted in agony, wounded man receives emergency trcat- rnrrii slrecL a5 he is comforted by woman acquaintance. Ac- i 10 miormatlon accompanying photo when it was passed by Bri- IIsn censor and cabled from London to York ic a he was of 3 constantly narrowing Injured in German attack on _ i mm llic direction of partisan action. Mr. Rocscvelt continued conversa- tions on (lie International situation telephone, over the week-end, Early said, but has nci yet touched that stolen from Mrs. Louise Knight uid's wiin ineir nounds caught i ls aeiermmea. wolf early Monday after i Sllcn' 3 proposal, diplomatic chase over Ihe Tom Cole and. said, might be made by Carrulh ranclies in the soathwest iRllssia or Germany's axis partner rm liic county. Tile wolf had j depredations on tiiesei wilil first move from the surrounding ranches, killing cast "'a1 pinned Poland in a .'-i large turkeys on Mrs. Ish Crad- i Moscow informed po- lurd's place and praclically Ihe en-ilantl's allics. Brilain and 1-rance lire nock on the Carruth'place Soviet Union would follow a neutral iwlicy toward them. .Manulncturimj establishments in In a radio broadcast by Prcmlrr- losas paid wage earners' Foreign Commtear VyacheflafT Mo and produced goods j Hand in his notes, (o 24 gov- jn Moscow. ana produced goods "and in his note valued at in 1937. The' eminents represented (department of commerce licuncing the data obtained "from census of manufacturers snfd (hat crossing of the frontier was describ- ed as necessary to protect once- Russian minorities in Eat'.ern Po- ij-.anufnrturing hart added i land. I A7 to the value of raw material in I Mol.olofr said the Polish eoveni- establlahments I ment "ceased lo exist." and the paid wage earners I minorities-11.000.000 White Rus and produced goods worlh and "aban- w ettablishments addedldoned entirely to their late- Si to the wortli of mate-1 A Russian broadcast said Red rials through manufacturing. Loui- j troops had been given in siana establishments paid 7C.C57 bilant welcomes by the population wage earners produced White Russia and in the Polish goods valued at and Ukraine. It made no mention of fmhtin" although (he radio lost night knowlo.'lged Ihe Poles were puttins up resistance. On 500-Mile Front The Red army advance was re- ported general along a 500-mile frontier between Latvia on the nortli and Huniania on the south Russians said they took Glebokie northeast of Wilno: narannowicze' railway center 50 miles from the gixx i i-id S to the value of leriat through manufacture. Dur- ing the year establishments throughout the country produced S78.410.506 worth of canned and cured seafood. of cotton narrow fabricks, of COM on woven goods over 12 inches in width. of cotton yarn and thread, ol srcasc and tallow, of leather, tanned and cured, 3S7.910 of wholesale packed meals J3i2.042.808 of cottonseed oil, cake meal, of petrol- f.'ifm refining. of race, cleaning and polishing, saddlery, harness and whipn, S107.395J3C. sugar cane, not Includ- ing products ol refineries, 289 of wool combing commission and tops for sale, of uool pulling, and wool, Rev. and Mrs. L .p. Parker and Miss Helen, have relum- from a vacation trip of some length. Most of the time was spent in Hot Springs, Ark., but they also went to Memphis. Tcnn., where he performed the wedding ceremony (or his brother, E. H. Parker. En route home, they spent a day In Glaclcw.itcr. Bill Parker, Iheir son, i.; (caching in Lyltle this year. i l-'rom interest shown and exhibit entered, Denton County ,'2ir officials arc forecasting the hobby exhibit as a feature Item of the five-day 1939 show, Secretary 0. L. Fowler of the fair association said today! Wood carvings, pipes, siiflls and horns arc some of Ihe exhibits entered to date for the Mir. Oct. 3-7. he said. Premiums of nnd are oflcred as second and third prizes, re- W. Stockard, son of Mr. and Mrs. James A. Slookard. 106 West Sycamore Street, Denton, gas among Ihe students who re- ceived "A" grades in all their cotirf.es In the 1939 summer session 0! the University of Michigan, ac- cording to word received here. OFFICERS AGREE ON LINES BE ATTAINED IN Sept. -Na- swastika and llic Russian ham- mer and sickle met today in the -.jplev ells was not secured. Ing .troops into Poland. .Early said he had not heard it mentioned. ee Louis Odds 6-] Over Pastor they would be i.iiiuHiwns uiey woulil bo ui s> _- 5' ir' connection VJCt ft M S S I O II (he week-end. 14 casings 'ated at Mineral Wells and lord, and .1 truck was sent, flf to Corsicana where it was believed I'-3''') IIIS about 40 mere were located. pose the president's program. They were likely to meet oppo- sition, however, from Senators Aus- tin of Vermcnt, the assistant He- publican leader, and TaJt of Ohio.- both of whom have declared lor repeal of the embargo. The fight against repeal was car- rleci on yesterday by another Re- publican, Senator Johnson of Cali- fornia. In a, statement Issued at San Francisco, Johnson said the presi- dent had warned the nation' In an I address In 1S36 .that, in "fhe 'event 1 of war. in another country, it would require the "unswerving, support of, all Americans" to resist the clamor" (o Follow Charges in (lie wile- thorilative sources here intimated liiey had information of an oul- i fallen Polish city of Brest-lilovsk of civil war in Warsaw. They where Russian revolutionists antl j said one group was desirous of ca- Gerraans signed thsr separate nftulallng and another was delcr- i revolutionists and sa ,mxl tlisr separate pi1 peace in the World Wai. The Sc.viet Russians came DETROIT. Sept. 18. For one reason nr that Joe Louis is too lop-heavy'a fa-j spread ring would be filed voruc or Bob Pastor is too danger- conclusion of Investigations Han- ous n question mark to fool around j nali said Monday, wasn't, enough betting i Charges also will bc filed in sov- heavyweight I cral oilier Texas ovjulies. (he local championship bout to cover a thin i olTicials have bccn told by other of- The chances were the champion J would enter (he ring better than1 1 lo 6 favorite. in front Ihe east, according to German mined (o f Authoritative they were sources declared vealed. Hospital patients asio have been removed far inland in order advices from 'the front and hands with German officers nt the head of troops who completed (he conquest of Brest-LItovsk, 150 miles east ol Warsaw, yesterday. German and Russian officers were said tonight Ui be engaged in fixing a lone beyond which their rcspcclive ,'orces would not go in Pciand. DMB (Oennan official news agen- cy meanwhile reported theGerrmm mililary had resumed Its effort lo force Warsaw's surrender. German Airmen l-> West Intimations-Ihe German air force ou IIIUL-S irutn ine.j uurman air 'orcc frontier: Ditbno, of Lwoiv. may hand in the light- Taniopol, In the Ukranian sec- tion southeast of Lwow. Tlml would place llic Russian and German armies within 68 miles of each other. That is tho distance from Dubno lo Wlodzlmicrz. report- ed held by German troops norlh ol Lwow. Advance guards of the two forces would bc even closet southeast of Lwow. German mechanized unite were reporled to have crossed a railivviy southeast of Lwow. Rus- sian advance troops were said to bc in Tarnonol. within 50 miles of tnc railroad. At Baranowicze. German planes and Russian troops struck at the fame objective. Thc Russian gen- eral staff announced the capture nflcr Russian and German radio broadcasts told of heavy German air raids against the city. A general staff communique said the Kusslana defeated scvcrji -'weak advance unit.'! and reserves of the Polish army at points where there was resistance. general staff said ten Polish fcarplanes were brought down Invasion from the east, reporled started yesterday at 6 a. m. (9 p m. CST, came two days after Russia and Japan called an armistice along the bonier of So- viet-controlled Outer Mongolia and Japanese-dominated Manchoukuo. WASHINGTON RANCHER HANG- ED FOR SLAVING WALLA WALLA. Wash., Sept 18. Talbott, 19, rancher of Hiinlsville. was hanged ?.l the state penilf-nlinry today for slaving W. E McKinney. 70, Walts- burg farmer, Aug. 9, 1938. ing on the western front were con- lained for the first time in today's communique of the supreme com- mand. It was said the nir force its work in the virtually cntlcd and now was ready for whtre. Berlin c'tizens eke- yesterday and today observed members of (he air force from Ilio enst arriving in the capital. rlhc German communique aeain emphn.wed complete dissolution of Polish forces by an encirclement movement. The situation in Warsaw. Polish capital, was left unanswered. The communique merely said no Polish negotiator had appeared by last midnight Warsaw had asked his reception. Authoritative sources, however. raid threatened brjnbardmcnt of the city had not begun. Lwow Fate Staled The fate of Lwow. capiial of the Polish Ukraine, 226 miles southeast of Warsaw, seemed sealed after complete encirclement, and after Lublin, about midway of the War- saw-Lwow road, had been captured. Germans said. One-fourlh of the Polish army, the communique claimed, faced de- struction cr dlssojulion In a narrow compressed space southwest of Wys- Kigrod, which is about 40 miles west of Warsaw. The communique described the western front as quiet except (hat one Trench plane was shot down. Civil War in Warsaw With the German military mach- ine on the west, end the vast Sovi- et Russian army on the east, plac- ing Poland in a mighty vise, au- reporled as scheduled for Brcst- Litovsk. All expectant mothers were re- moved from Aachen on the western front in first or second class (rain compartments, informed sources re- event the western campaign assumes larger proportions. It was denied, however. Mint'Aa- chen generally has bccn descried oy civilians, although preparations have been made to do if (he need arises. RUSSIA'S THRUST IN POLAND CAUSES SMALL NEUTRALS TO WONDER ABOUT THEIR FATE BUDAPEST. Sept. viet Russia's swifl Ihnist into Po- land was walched today with fear and hope by heavily-armed neutral nations of Southeastern Europe, al odds over their problems of Irans- pJantcd minorities nnd disputed territories. Questions .ere asked immediate- ly in each opUnl whether Russia's military move to "protect" once- Ktissinn mlnorltic.-; In Eastern Po- Inncl would Jeopardize or enhance their chances to hold or regain land won or lost in World War treaties At slake are vast i -eas. a wealth of resources and tho Vate of 000 pcrjiie who live in lands outside flic nations speak. who.se tongues they In Bulgaria, Ihe Soviet action was hailed widely as reviving hope for a forced icvision of World War boundaries. The opinion was expressed at So- fia that fast-moving events might put Bulgaria fn a position ta regain the rich Dobrudja section along the Black Sea where Bulgars live under the Rumanian flag. In Rumania, a spokesman for Foreign Minister Grlgore Gafencu said the Russian minister had giv- en assurances the Soviet Union owuld continue to respect Ruma- nia's territorial Integrity. Some observers said Rumania was In the most precarious position of the southeastern nations. Rumania had two territorial wor- ries. Fear has ben expressed Rus- sia may try to take back the Bessa- land south of the Rus- whirl, skin-Ukrainc-i ralnian, am, There Is concern, also, over what cflect the new move might have on Hungary's desire lor the return of Transylvania, where they arc 1 300 000 Magyars. Foreign Minister Stefan Csaky of Hungary marln n clear his couniry lias not forgotten Transylvania when he said last week the involving this scclion was "seri- ous." Meanwhile, Hungary's desire Is complicated by (he (nought that re- turn of Tr.miylvania might find Hungary with Russia as a neighbor just across the frontier. Since Hungary's Bolshevist revo- lution after the World War. Buda- pest's short-lived communist re- and (he bitter counter-revolu- tion of 1910. then; has been strong opposition (o anything comnnmis- llc. In Turkey, where it had been re- ported that Foreign Minister Sukru Sarecoglu was preparing to go (o MO.SCOW to discuss a. friendship- pact between Russia and Turkey, there was no official comment. Observers there said that despite Turkey's mutual assistance pact with Britain and France, thcrs was a desire for continued warm friend- ship with the Soviet, whose troops- are massed along her frontiers. Dlplecnats m Yugoslavia looked toward Italy for some move that might prevent the spread of war. The only word from Greece was announcement of a new conscrip- tion law. BASEL. Switzerland. Sept. 18 ('TV-French fortress troops were re- ported today to have gained and held positions less than three miles from the German border town of Saarlautcrn during a scries of night Advices reaching Switzerland said Iliat while the Germans concen- trated on attacking French lines I on a ridge 10 miles north of Saar- CERNAUTI. Rumania, Sept William H. Col- bern, United Stales military at- tache, said today the command- er of a Soviet Russian tank he countered in Poland told him the Russians were "against the Germans." MaJ. Colbcrn, who has been in Poland as a military observer, said that yesterday he .'aw a column of 11-ton tanks on the road to liorojcnkn, about 
                            

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