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   Denton Record-Chronicle (Newspaper) - February 13, 1923, Denton, Texas                                1 in Ruhr DEPTOTRECORD-CHRONICLE DISCUSSED BY KING GEORGE IN ADDRESS unilr nueallon was discussed by Klntr George today. In his address from throne opening the second sc-s- of the fourlh Parliament of nit reign. He declared that although tin- wa.i unable lo toneur or participate In tlm Hu'ir It was acting In such a way OB nol to aaa lo thf ties of Great Britain's allies. The Klne regretted that the Hast treaty was. declined by the f'urklsh delegation but he hoped Clint the Turkish government may till bo iTlsposcd to accept the treaty. He welcomed thfc prospective wettlemcnt of tha British war debt to iho TJnlted Slates. Vlre Prrdlitlon F" I-O.VnON, Feb. 33. of Invmlon Vbraich Ilonnr Law In Common.! and Lord Cnrzoi. In tbe House of 1-ords predicted lliln eve- nine ttiat life French advance In the. Jiubr would end illiutslrously tar Vtunee as well as for Germany. two Kovernracnt spokesmen, tbe premier sneaking to crowded lower house while .the foreign ulnliier -ad- dressed Ibo on the occasion of Parliament opcidng, declnred all Eu- rope Is Imperiled by the occupation and Its potentialities. Feb. railroads of the lluhr were laker, over by the Vrench and Belgians today. A proclamation was Issued an- nountrtnu that henceforth the roads win under orders of tho occu- pying forces. German railroad icrces will he employed if they agree (o obey orders. Trains pasxlng through tho oc- cupied territory will carry a Ger- rmm a, hostago in the cab with the engineer to prevent sabotage The are to operated chtclly for thc bencllt of the prencb Hi-lglaas. Traffic to m6et the s or the German civilians will bo resumed, however, as fast us German railroad men return to work under military orders Gern Iteimrted United 1'Tflt nUpatcn I'Cb. officers floh-eed Gorman guests in the Han- delahof hotel with riding whips last nlghl. accnrdins io n German version ot n disturbance In which bayonets and machine guns were "rough! Into play nfritlnJit civilians here. Following this Incident and thc discharge under French orders of the staffs of two of Ksscn'.i largest lintels fur their refu to servo Liberty Bond Market. NEW YORK, Feb. 13__Liberty bond closings: 3 1'2a first 1 i-4s J9S.S6; second l-is tjag.7-4; tblrd _i a-'a ?89.08; fourth 4 1-ls JOS.90- VIClory 4 3-4s J100.20. Liverpool Cotton. United Fntl Dlipatch Feb. l3._Futures opened steady 1 lower to 4 -higher; closed quiet S lower to C higher. January 13.U 13 36 February 15.41 ]6.15 March 15.26 1523 May........................ 15.00 15.03 July 13.84 13.73 October 13.66 Spots steady. 16 higher, demand email. Sales 6.005; American 4.600 Imports 5.000; American 3.700. Mid- Vllng 16.07J. mivii ruiusill lo BervO the Invaders, anti-French posters appeared rnysterlousfy on walls and build! n KK throuiiliout the city. They had been ixisled surrepti- tiously during the night. CrlnfTikiri-hrn Atfoclrttd Vrtti DUES.SKl.DOHP. Fell. 13._Thc town of Gelsenkirchc-n has been fined: 100.000.000 marks to be paid tomorrow In view of thc encounter there yesterday between German police and Krench gendarmes. The burgomaster, the chief of police nnd believed to have been Involved In the aflalr were ar- rested. A German policeman was killed and two French KS.idarmes were wounded the affair, says the French official version of the inci- dent m-itic public today. JOENTON, TEXAS, TUESDAY AFTERNOON, FEBRUARY 13. 1923 Many Miner: Die in Dawson Mine Horror l, REPORTS TELL OF ALARMING TURK ACTIVITY Vnlltd Prcis A1IILKK, Keh. Alirmliie reports uccrnliiK Turkish mlllUrr activities rore rerelicd In Athens tills afternoon from reliable sources. The a'nrks reported lo have broken the Ilndanlii inct nnd to have concentrated roopH In Kiisteni Thrncc wliere ther New York Cotton. United Prfit Dttpateh NEW VORK. Feb. opened steady 6 to 12 higher; clos- ed steady 1 to 5 higher on near months and 3 to 15 lower on distant months. March...................27.3g May ..................28.20 July ..............27.78 October ..............25.35 December ............25.09 Spots Quiet as revised 28.05. .27.SO-J7 28.26-23 27.71-13 24.S7trdfr middling Fort Worth Livestock. Vnllttt Prtu Dbpatch FOR TWOHTH, Feb. In tha cnttlo division Tuesday to laled head of cattle and B'Ji calves. The mitr'ka ivns steady. The hog market was active with liberal receipts or 2.800 head. Pigs were In good demand and steady. were weak at S5c lower. Sheep were steady. neceipts 6oO head. JS.50ff7.S5; stock- era ;He7; cows heifers 13.50 bulls cnlvoa 12.51) (57; canners 12Q2.50; yearlings fl C7.EO. medium mixed light }7.30@ plgrs J5. 7.40; commori B.75; rough heavy rough Sheep and lambs I-ambs J8.505T H.40; ycarllnes ov 7. DO; culls utatsi2g3 OTR Btockcr sheep B.50; feeder lamb's JG. Chicago Grain. Uniltd Prill Dtipatch CHICAOO, Feb. tho heavy'aales hy profit takers late In Jtodays trading- on thc board of. trade, wheat, oats and rye showed net gains. Corn was weak duo to 1 heavy receipts and large offering's. Wheat reached a new high figure for tho crop, July and September wheat-buying in thc two month') being life heaviest on account of a severe cold wave sweeping the wcst winter wheat section which It feared would Injure thc (train. July reached JJ.I5 7-8 and Septem- ber }1.14 5-8. Corn, showed frnciionn.1 losses at the close although nome strength developed earlier In the.'lay In flood buying by commission houses. Cold weather will cut down receipts. traders b'olleve. About bush- tla were taken for export. Thorc wag n general for oats. Closing- pr'cea: 1-2, July 1-4, September ?1.H 1-8. IB 7-I8c, July 76 3-4..', September 77 3-8c. 40 3-8c, July 45 3-8c, September 43 5-8c..' City Livestock. Wnflfi Prtn DiipaleK KANSAS CJTV, Feb. lower; hull: Heavies packers and butchcru JtBllt. plSB Receipts 11.000; market steady. PrfSne fed steers JtOtff 10.76- trlaln to fair dressed beef stocrs Western steers I6.75O9.25; Southern steers Jfiffs.SO; cows 12 fitockera and feeders liulls calves Local Produce. QuolatlonR: llcrw 17o; trytre 25 ytre l-2c: iurkoys eggs 2fic; rpOHlcri 6c; table huttcr 204? packing stock Imttor 20c; per doien tl.BOQS.OO; KCCBC ALQUIN CONFESSES TO KILLING OF LOS ANGELES POLICEMAN Aiioctnlrri Ditpolclt T.OS "Httlc Phil" Alnnln. recently deported from eoiifc'ssed to Chief nf Police Onkes that he killed Uetectlrc Seriienul .Tolin ,T. linlf OKO, the ladiir. Tlic jave lieoii tnnde cm the trn ier arc arming S.tXM) nulgar uenilnnaes. Ottoman situation Is described us fever Ish. The soviet government IB reported to have landed Important stores of mu- nitions on the eastern coast of Thrace for use of ILe Turks. Dry Enforcement Conference United Frets WASHINGTON, Feb. Prpsi- eni TIanlinK's will call another net ot governors to consider -wnyu nnd. moans of prohi- hltloH enforcement tbrought the country us POOH as the uov- crncrs straighten out tiicir affairs. SIX PERSONS NATURALIZED HERE TUESDAY On hearings' before Judge C. R. Pearman In tho Sixteenth District Court six applicants were granted naturalization and made citi- "ie Jlouse to- rtrlv- haa as XeL 'boon net for conference which Js to take dlu- here n venr and Lrja Anueles stated confession was said (o c s on which -further details of suggestions Anseles. al Hardlng' lie wns tielntf rcturnci] In JUon Augcles. i.....-- nu.nmfia um is telling Chief Oakes'ner for sixteen Kovornors last Do tbnt he "Iri-utcil liiin HjvlH Iwenuso hml boon dcoont to me." AViuln sn Oakes k-t him rldo In n and foil til in ham mid ctfcs. He untd Dint un tlie of tlio khi- liW he went tn KPO it Klrl .it the house wticpc klUiiiK occurreiL Tlie girl wns no't tliorc he went Jaier. Me SflM lie on ihc door ami an olfircr cmne out iiml rcnelicil tovartl lih hip ucconlliic {o AliEiiiii, :flhl ho nrt'il OIKC ami ran. Senate to Consider Debt Settlement Bill Wednesday Atfoeinlfrl Prfit WAKIIIMJTON, Feb. agree- ment wns reuched today by the Sen- ate lU'puljIinin leaders lo Iny.nslde lhc administration Fbipptnp hill tomorrow frir consideration of llic British debt .'ttletaent legislation. t I'ASO MAX SLliEPR EIGHT UAVS Attcchtril frus Iliipatth EL PASO, It. Paxton. assistant to William Kcmuer, pres- ident of the Orient Railroad, has been sleeping oieht iluys. He re- turned In January from Mexico where he had been directing Im- provement work and complained of heinff.lll. At tlic Jfttsonlc hospital it was paid ho was treated with serum and that physicians hope for his recovery. 13. Keports of all STATE snows AUSTIN', Feb. a the Texns railroads show a derease in onoratlon durlntr the 11 months 'of 1022 ending Nov. 30 last, and a uccrcnHo In revenues, hut despite this fact a substantial income 'Is shown.. Total revenues of tho 11 months are with oper- ating cost of leavlnu net profit of The ratio of operating revenues to operating expenses was 81.73 per cent last year, against 81.31 per cent for the previous AT ItKCKPTJO.Y FOIt OWSI.EV Tr.XAUKANA TEXARKANA, -Feh. 1 A reccp- Mon Is hclng arranged for Alvin M. national 'commander of tho American Legion, when he is sched- uled to visit hero on Feb. 27, and members of neighboring Legions are being Invited to attend. AI.VIX M. II. I, MILWAUKEE, Feb. 13. Alvin "M. Owaley. national commander ot lie American Legion, left after at- c-ndjng the State convention here sairt to hr suffering with agrippc. SET IV rtAnro itECnivi.vti cmmciir VAN; Feb. radio receiving set has been installed in .he First Methodist Church here. Kuit TrxiiH tonight ptxrtly cloudy, colder In nnrlli nnil went parllr cloudy, rolilpr. >Vcht Texan partly rlouily nmf cold (V.iro In north por- llnn with Icmpfrnluro of 10 to 2C prohjilily colder In doiilli portion. Tempernture Maximum yesterday 14 today 51 llftromrltr Rrndlnvi 2 p. m. ycatorday................ 29.76 7 a. m. today 23.3D lirl.llvr Humidity 7 a. m. today H fur cent VAX HAH ION'POST VAN AI.STVNE. Feb. 13__A post of the American Legion has been organized here with thc Inaugu- ration last night of -twenty-one members into the Burk Post of this Legion, named for Lieut. Hobart Burk, killed in Prance In action. V.. B. Cooper was named post com- mander nnd Dr. C. H. Reseda, post adjutant. zens of the United States Tuesday. Thc hearings were conducted Tucs- morning and nnnl details of Movement of munitions and wnr mn- naturalization und tho adinin- erlals from the Interior to Ismcil and "iv tho oclth completed the Daratinellen Is reporlcil In a- dls- ihe Tuesday afternoon. pafcli from Greek sources In willed (he! of San Antonio. -lasslBtant to M. II. Anthonl, natur- alization examiner for tho Suite conducted tho hearings and on his reconimendallons Judge real-man acted in all eocene one case In which he overruled tin; motion of the examiner and granted citizen- ship .to the applicant. Citizenship was granted Herman Angus Uecker, of I.cwlsvllle, Route 1; William Oehlke. Lewisville- H A.. Wolfsohn. Denton; p. C. Storrlc Joseph F. Droshein. Ar- uylo, Iloute 1; Christian Trtetsch Denton, Route 2. Of. ihe .fifteen costs of lappll- on file six were continued for n year for various reasons. Thev were the implications ot Moses Derman, Denton; Herman Dnmkc Krum; Joe Wichita Kails' Joseph Zellner, Vllot Point; Johii IJavls. Dilllns; Albert, HoHcian, Mcsquite, Koutu 2 Three applications were dismiss- ed on motion of the examiner on account ot ihe appllcanls having claimed exemption during tho World War from military service because of l.elng aliens. The nplHl- lants were instructed tliat the fivn year period on thin condition would expire .Nov. 12, 1023, and that they could Itlc applications after that time. Jurors Dlsr-linrgert The jurors summoned for the first week of the term and who were in attendance at the Court Tuesday were dlschaiged Tuesday afternoon by .Judge IVarman who announced that nil jury cases set for Ihe first week had be'.n dispos- ed of without golnp; to trial. PURL PROPOSES INVESTIGATING GIRLS' SCHOOL 1'reu Hitpatch AUSTIN, Keb. t-xipnslro !n- stlgatlon of ttio of the lrls' Training School ni nolucsville is ltci] for li.v n reHolntlon trodiK'Cd In Hie Tlouwg liv ItciirescDt- ntivo Turt. The lies developed tn the nluiny .st-jioul of pnrolliiK linnato-s to ImlEviihtnl llvlui; In nut) nlmnt the oil f Texas the rosolutlon CONTRACT FOR OWNERS' PART OAK PAVING LET stntod that reports is-ere Sconee vs. Ksiij- Announcement was Scltlrd nade by at- lorneys for the plaintiff Monday nf- lernoon that hy agreement the suit f-f Claude Kc-onco vw. M. 1C. ,t T. Uy. Co. for damages that has been pending here since 1914 has been mottled by agreement. The judg- ment-on (lie. tn the case shows Ihe Knly paid Sconce and agreed on page, 4.) und It current of the si'lionl. lug reports thnt such on Inves- would be. asked Dr. Currie Smith, suiierlntemlent of the school. Issued a statement recently In which she said she would welcome sui'h rrcfercnthil rrlmjirj 11111. The Scnnte will have opportunity lo .ass upon a preferential primary pro- posnl. It becnme i-erfain todny when Davis of Dnlins Introduced 11 Mil prcicrlWnr; only one primary elec- tion nnd eliminating a si'coud prlnniry. The llolhrook bill proiMing for n KoiKiralo hanking dcpnrtniunt M-IIS pass- ed to cngrossmeut in thc Kennte. A.s Pinjrossi-d. It cuts sonic salaries orlgl. luilly provided. 1'nrnclilnl .Senool IU1J Killed United Prfta AUHTI.X. l.li_lly slrlklnfj out the enacting clause the House after heated debate killed thc an- ti-parochial school Mil l.'V ncprc- sc-ntaiivc Baker of Mllam todny. The vote wns 72 nnd C4. The. dcalh nf the measure was made complete by vole to reconsider anil table. The motion tu strike oil! the i-nitcrllng t-hinse uinde by Eleprescnlntlvo Ku- genc If. liloiinil of iViieogdoehes mid he was Klrnuyly supporled by Hepresenl- ntlvo of County. If you jmsH this bill ron will rulse more hilly hell In Tcxns Hum nllior Inn- you could put on Ihe utnluto shouted Lnckey In speaking In support nf mount's motion. "Von will t-duse trouble from one end nf the Ktjite lo die oilier anil I am afraid bloodshed. Kill the hill If you want ponce In Tcx- 3." Senator DOJ-K.'S bill In ereulo county juvenile lioiu-ds wns unfiivornlily reiiort- hy the Seinue coniiullli'c on Crliu- Innl .Turlspnuleui-e lodiiy. Tho W. M. Jugoe Co. Was award- ed conlract lor the property own- ers' part of the paving for West Oak Streei at a special session of thc City Commission meeting with tho West Oftk Street committee unlay afternoon when blda were opened and tabulated. The Jagoe firm was the only one of seven bidders to file bla for tho entire Job. The others bid for only a part of the work. The JaBoe bid to- laled for cuibs and gut- ters. eight-Inch crushed 'stone macadam base bound with asphalt oil an-1 the two-inch conltnonlal rock asphalt surfacing. I'nvcmc-nt Is to extent) approxi- mately 7.326 lineal feet. Under this contract the city of enton a.i Us one-third- of the ptw- -g cost Is to prepare tho slreel for the base-, pinco and roll tho base and bear the expense of tho street Intersections besides paying- most of the cost of the adjustment ot the old M. B. Whltlock Co. contract. H was.estimated by Mayor Hennen Monday afternoon In the Commis- sion meeting that tho city's part of the paving besides.the work Iho street iiml bridge department will do will nmount to about 000 The contract as awarded to W M. Jagoo Co. provides It In subject to completion by the property own- ers for whom the Weal Oak Street has acted, city Enril- n T ,Koch ia preparlnK tiio dual data showing tho actual cost jo property owners arid when' this Information is complete the West Oak committee will present the matter to each property owner wllh individual conlract for him to slfc-n, thus relieving the city of any obligation In passing nn assessment ordinance ngalnat the- property. On Cxls inch curb and as was started on the street under the termer contract tlio (lew bid Is for 70c per lineal foot, making J0o foot the city will have to pay in sqttlcment of thc old conlract in arconlanco wllli tho agreement made.somu tlmo niro, It was stilted. This amount will be paid by the _' for all curb and gutter com- pleted under the old contract, ac- cording tu' the agreement. Charter Amendments Provide for Appointive Officials Jafrae'A ma Six by 24 In 10.C10 lineal feet.   70c, 6 inch concrete gutter 
                            

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