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Commerce Journal Newspaper Archive: October 9, 1958 - Page 1

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Publication: Commerce Journal

Location: Commerce, Texas

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   Commerce Journal, The (Newspaper) - October 9, 1958, Commerce, Texas                               Jiicarcf Co. --1 I 1 -J 17 t! J. L, HUFF1NES JIU chairman of the campaign committee for Commerce's first United Fund drive, stopped long enough to pose for a picture with his four sons. Ray, 6; the twins, Don and Phil, months; and Jimmy, who is 7. Directing such a household probably helps- lo qualify Mr. HuCUnes for promoting such an undertaking as the for an goal set by the Board oC Directors. Fund drive begins Oct 16. Unitet! fund Oct. 20 Plans Jor Commerce's first t poses of the drive. United Fund drive to raise 000 with Oct. solicitations .--the date begin, are for all set, it was announced, today by L. Huffines; JTr.. chairman of the campaign An advance drive, to begin on Oct. 13, will be directed by A. TV. (Jack) TJlly, assisted by Clyde Jtobnett and John Armstrong. "This drive must be a success." emphasised Mr. Huffines, "tor it will set the pattern for alt fu- ture' United Fund drives." Huffines and the flev. TVilHanft. P. Hardegree, president of the Unitedv'rjjnd Board of IXrecTors, will1 -visit eacb service club to explain plans and pui- Mecbanical cotton strippers were pressed into service this week area growers sought to harvest their now open crop. One gin said at least eight of its customers were using the ma- chines. _ Field hands were less plentiful this week. Wary of tue Latin American picftcrs ate moving on, as cotton opened to the west. Class and 'grade continued ;c hold up well despite the long siege of showery weather. Most cottoo is bringing between 30 and 35 cents a pound. Seed re- main at their. S40 level. The Xour gins reported the following number of bales pro- cessed: Fairlie Gin Co. 1908 Petek ond Robinson 1306 Electnc Gin L-----........------ 835 Farmers Co-Op 635 The crop is estimated at 60 per cent gathered Com- merce area.. Banker To Speak At Meeting Robert McWhirter. president of the Ftrsi National -bank of Parts, will be guest at tJw reg- ular meeting of the local Cham- ber of Commerce, noon Monday Jn the City cafe. "We cxpftctlng several visi- tors othen than the speaker." said W, S. McWhlrlar, secTelary-inan- BAer of the Commerce organiza- tion. "All diectors" arc urged to attend." Mr. Hardegree stressed, will take all of us working to- gether to put this over, but there is no reason it cannot be done.' Mrs. L. H. Leberman has been named chairma-i of the Women's Division, and she will be re- sponsible for their part in campaign. Mrs. Leberman stated that the women arc particularly interest- ed in sc-eing a UaJicd Fund drive succeed, since they are always the first ones contacted when there is a money drive to oe conducted. 'Committees are set up so that every person will have an oppor- tunity to contribute. In addition to the Advance Gifts committee, there lull be a Business com- mittee, a Railroad committee. College Public Schools committee, and Norru school area. At a meeting of the United Fund board e riday afternoon. Marvin Kirkman was elected to nil the- unexpired two-year, term of: Leonard Frewitt, The group Jtvas informed by_ fir T. English, -State KepVeseniafive for the National Foundation'for Infantile. Vai-aly- thai they did not wish to oe included in the budget, since they conducted their own drives, fhev- had been alolied in the appropriations. A check for has already been sent to Commerce by the oalvaiion Army to be Uaed In local relief woik unto after the ative is completed. They will leave one-third oi the money .-set aside tor them lor local use. W. S. McWhirter, J. 0. Kenzic, Mr. Lilly and Mrs. Hida Grit fitts are the local Salvation Army committee. Season Opens On Taxpayers Commerce taxpayers joined in tytnpalhiz- ing wllh sctulr- and Quail. Open season on property e-wning homo officially Oel. 1 and will eon- tinv midnight Jan. 31. Worse still, ell limits are ex- pieled lo be filled. Barrages oi tax notices were laid down last weelz, first by Ihe Commerce Independent School District. folio-wed almesi at by Hual county memos, final- ly by ihou from the Cipy of Commerce. Approximately 2400 n aliens firsd by tha CISC brought in r n 11 Although fetf Jhe first ihiea days "were termed only normal by T. A. Smith, and collactor, Saturday set an lima high for October. Commerce urnal Serving Commerce: The Home of East Texas State College 5 Per Copy VOLUME 69 Member Associated Press COMMERCE, (HURT TEXAS, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1953 TWELVE PAGES TODAY NUMBER  rings math department and then promoted to principal of the System for a five-year tprm. After that he -was Hopkins coun- ty superintendent for eight years. He and his wife are members of the Methodist church. They have three children. Their young- est daughter, Martha, is enroll- ed at East Texas State this se- mester as a freshman. Final Budget In other action, the school board approved a final budget for the coming year. This figure included from the building fund which was not used last year and was rebudgeted. Other changes made from the tentative budget was an Increase of S100C for teaching aids, and for plant maintenance. The figure for the coming year compares with Jast year's budget of However, of that figure only was spent because of the build- ing program. The year ended Tvith a balance of S4.500. This was brought for- ward. I Members of the, board also approved JmanciaL reports "tor August anfl'Septeaiber- They'rScKvecl the auditor's re- port of school receipts and ex- penditures for the past year. Carltoa A. Sheram, certified public accountant of Greenville made the audit. A detailed fi- nancial report for the past year will appear in next -week's Jour- The board considered requests from individuals to buy the lum- ber from the razed band shack, tnrt decided to store the material lor future use to repair plant buildings. Commerce Lions club is- all set for the annual house-to-house Sroom Sale on Tuesday, Oct. 14, -tarting at pjn, it was an- nounced today by C. H. RusselL general chairman. A downtown sale, a xuck wfll be parked on the downtown square, will be held all day Saturday, Oct 11, with Webb Jones in charge. Pre-sale teams will canvass all churches and business housss. Advance orders for home deliv- ery may be made by calling each day before 4 p.m. All articles to be sold in this sale come from the Texas Blind Workshop, operated by. the Lighthouse for the. Blind. aon-profit organization gives eoV ployment 10 bund and crippled persons who manufacture the terns offered for sale. Profits to the local Lions dub will go to the Crippled Chil- dren's "camp which they help sponsor at Kerrville- A Com- merce child is sent to this camp summer, with T.ilah Beth" neatljer attending in-1958r- Articles fo "be? sold include jrooms. mops; ironing board pads and covers, door mats, delinters, clothespin bags, skirt hangers, and lawn rakes in addition to a number of other useful house- nold items. This bas been a successful project of Commerce Lions during the past several years. From Out Of The Sulphur Dozer Crosses SH 11 A huge bulldozer nosed. its way into the open last'week fit the Highway 11 crossing on South Sulphur. It laised its blade in cheerful recognition and sa'id in flawless ''Dr. Livingston, I Roboleso: presume." Then it crawled across the road snd resumed iU work of clearing a path up the creek for the now channel, a part of the Cooper rafcrvoir conserva- tion project. This simple ceremony marked the first public appearance of the dozar and its driver since they entered the lowlands at Bailay crossing, near Emblem, the middle ol July. They will next be seen at the Harlow crossing: then Campbell bridge, and finally end up on the lower nlde of the Gresnville Highway 24 bridge all in all a dis- tance of approximately 15 miles The dragline, rowling out a new bed for. Sulphur, is about a mile and e Half behind the dozer, grunting along at the rate, of about 400 led a Con- tractor H. C. Miller would not set a date when it -would reach the Sulphur Springs bridge, say- ing that too many factors beyond his control. A bad spell of weather, or a change of for- mations could slow down prog- ress of tlic huge machine. Abo at five' miles of the channel has been completed to daw, Meanwhile, Sulphur river this week was turned into the new channel about s mile below the Cotton Bolt crossing, and future flow of the stream will be pait- ly carried by the new ditch. At Bailey crossing, a temporary bridge has been swung across the channel. There backwater from September rains caused some sloughing and slides. On Middle Sulphur, E. L. Mtl- len is engaged in clearing, grub- bing1 and excavating landside ditches along three levee systems, He. and his crew are also re- pairing corrugated metal covers of pipes that go beneath the big dams. The drains are so rigged as to allow field water to flow mto the creek, but keep the Stream from entering the fields. Two of the levees are on Mid- dle Sulphur; one on South Sul- phur, The dumps are being re- paired to take care or flood water until the new channels have scoured sufficiently to car- ry overflows. The rate of widen- ing will depend on rains in the yeari imrriediately ahead, but, the process is expected to take sev- eral years. A Email dragline is being used for ditching along the toe of trfe levees, but the larger machine for channeling has not yet been brought on the job. Virtually no time has been lost on either branch of Sulphur bacauso of bad weather. Cars Damaged At Sycamore And Arp Two automohiles were heavily clamaged in a crash late Monday afternon at the intersection of Sycamore and Aip streets. Three persons were examined at a local hospital but were dis- missed. Drivers of the cars were Wil- liam Britton Karrh, East Texas State college student from Tex- arkana, in a 1954 Packard and prof. Edward Harris, mathe- matics instructor at East Texas, in a 1954 Plymouth. Riding with Professor Harris weie his wife and three children. They were treated for shock and bruises. Karrh was alone. A charge of reckless driving was filed against the student. He paid a S11.70 iine in Corporation court. I In! VEU Will Form Friday Circle K club, collegiate divi- sion of Kiwanis International, will be organized at a.m. Friday, according to Leon T. Harney. sponsor. Any ETSC male student is eli- gible for membership in the serv- ice organization. Members are re- quired to maintain scholastic averages necessary for any cam- pus group, and attend a majority of meetings, "Circle K is solely a service said Mr. Harnev. "It must seek out and develop ncrivilies that will be of greatest value. Each school its own needs, and clubs indicate their initia- tive by developing projects to take care of these added the industrial education instruc- tor. Administrators To Attend Conference Supt. Leonard Prrwitt and Prin. Marvin Kirkman. will at- tend the fall conference of Texas school administrators over the weekend. The schoolmen will leave for the stale capital Saturday after- noon and lo Commerce Monday night. M. B. MESSLER Broom Sales Slated iessfer Offers Resignation About December 1 East Texas Homecoming Predicted A 'Humdinger' More than letters are in the mail io East Texas exstu- dents, friends and families ex- tending invitations to the 1953 Homecoming which, is scheduled Saturday, Oct. 25. The letters, signed by Stuart Daaiels, president of the Student Association, are only one port-en of a gigantic campaign fa create gi eater in the East Texas tradi- tion. Theme Selected Over-all theme of the 1958 Homecoming is designed io cor- relate with the renewed interest in science. It is in the form, of a formula: X plus Y plus P equals H58. The formula in- clude X equals X-students; Y tquatls You; P equals Present students, and H58 equals Home- corning 1958. For the first time, the Ex-Stu- dents association, under the di- rection of Everett Erb> execu- tive' secretary, and the organiza- tions elected officers, a Coming Home Queen, has been selected. In two Coming Home queens have been ET Enrollment Set At 2576 Tall enrollment at East Texas Slate "college has been, totaled at 2576, an increase of seven percent over the 1857 figure, according to Hegistrar John "WindelL Largest percentage increases wera in Jhe sophomore class with 10 "freshmen andt juniors eight percent. Addi- tional quarters for slu- dents hava ibten provided. this fall, 'and sorae upperclass received-permission to live off campus. The 2576 total enrollment in- cludes 763 freshmen, 514 sopho- 492 juniors, 433 seniors and 375 graduate students. All classes showed increases. Final enrollment for the 1957 fall semester was pegged at 240S- 150 Women Due Here For Federated Club Meet are Eleanor Norman and Evelyn Albright, twins of Dallas, both former students. Election Set Nominations for a campus Homecoming Queen -will he se- lected in an all-college election Oct. 20. -Peny HudeJ, Taco, has been nsmed Coach of the Year after "uessing correctly the score in last gear's homecoming gridiron Maln festivities of tfie Hbme- ccmmg Day celebration will lie parade through Commerce fea- turing area marching bands and floats accenting the "Song Titles of the Past" theme: East Texas Lions TS. Sam Houston State Besrkats gridiron battle at 2 p-m. in Memorial stadium; and a Homecoming dance Saturday night, featuring the EasTexans, college dance band. The annual Saturday noon barbecue, held at the Field House, is open to everyone this year for the first time. Plates will be and they should be purchased in advance by stu- dents who plan to said Secretary Erb. Registration Of Exes Registration, of exes will begin nl 8 a.m. in the Music auditor- ium. A new constitution and by- laws are scheduled for adoption. Mayo exes have scheduled a meeting which will begin at JIO a.m. A program and luncheon are scheduled. Other activities planned -will be pore-game ceremonies inchid- intf the presentation of. awards to winning floats, presentation of honorary cadet colonels, .a ban- quet Training School exes, and coffees and exes of -various organizations and religious groups- Cheerleaders! Plan. Adrrity ZT cheerleatders have schedul- ed a bonfire and pep rally for Friday night preceding Home- coming. A "Blue and Gold" variety show which had been planned as another Homecoming "first" was cancelled because of construc- tion of new buildings involving the present auditorium. Approximately- 150 dub women from Third District. Texas Fed- eration cf Women's Clubs, are expected lo attend the fall board meeting today to be held at the Home Economics building on 'he 'East Tesas State college campus, according to Mrs. W- Y. Goff, res- ervation chairman. Registration begins at a.m. Mrs. Warren Keys from Mar- shall is president of tht district representing 140 clubs v.'ith a membership of some 5000 women. The six Federated clubs of Com- merce are hostesses for the con- ference. Mrs. J. L. Huffines Jr., first vice president of the dis- trict, is general chairman and Mrs. Carl Hyatt, co-chairman. This is the first meeting uf the board of directors sirce Mrs. Keys' election last spring. The theme of the new aJrninistratinn is -Challenge Is Spiritual Begins in the American Home." The executive committee will meet at 9 a.m. followed by the call to order of the general board mreting at o'clock in the auditorium. Presidents of clubs, program chairmen and club women from the district will at- tcnd. of new ideas for presentation to individual clubs "i the dishr.i t is the purpose of this one-day Mrs. Keys Commerce Banks To Close Monday Commerce banks will be closed Monday. Oct. 13, in observance of Columbus Day, occurring Oct. 12, The Commerce post office will remain open, as will other busi- nesses. Cnristoforo Colombo, Genoese I explorer, is credited with hav-' ing discovered America in 1492. His curiosity brought him little other than fame, and he died in the shadow of prison walls 14 years later. fates. Luncheon A luncheon will be served at pjm. at the First Christian church, with members of the Womerils Christian Fellowship in charge. Jirs. Grady Gibson is general ciiairman. Following the luncheon Dr. Wathena Temple, head of the See FEDERATED CLUBS, Page 6 Bowman Swears In Fail Grand Jury The District Court faH Grand Jury in session this -week at Greenville was expected to pass on between 45 and 50 cases. The estimate was nude by District Judge L. L. Bowman Jr., who swore in the panel. Bay Davis wis appointed lore- man of the body. Others are J- F. Whittmore, Wnlfe City; Floyd: Adair, Camp- bell; Guy Payne, Caddo 'Mills: A- P. Green, Celeste; and. Homer Wacasey, Jesse Heece, Shelby Sinclair Jr., Carl Warren, Tern Bailey and John Paul Jones, all of Greenville. K City Manager M. B. Messier has submitted his resignation to the City Commission, to become effective Dec. i, it was announced Tuesday evening by Dr. H. Leberman, mayor. Mr. Messier told the commis- sion, that the effective date "of his resignation, was and that he would stay oo a "wfek or two" after that dale if the commission so desired; or, in the event a replacement was found before Dec. 1 he would time his resignation at their discretion. He said1 that he did not expect to seek another city manager's job, and unless there were unexpect- ed developments he would be in no hurry to leave. Br. Leberman announced Mr. Messler's resignation at an exec- utive session of the commission following their regular meeting Tuesday evening in the city hall, and at the same time asked mem- bers of the commission for their advice on Ihe procedure of se- curing a new manager. Mr. Messier assumed' his sition in CoJnmerce July 5, 1935, Folowiog A_ K. Steinheimer who resigned to lake the city mana- ger's-job Mr.-Messier came to Commerce from- Mas_c6u- tah. HL, where he. was'city-resi- dent manager. i ,f_ Qnw-Wiy In the regular meeting; .th'e commission" "voted' tcT install side parking on Bob d'Axc strtat tram Lee srreet to Live" Oakland Mayo street and' Campbell itreet to one-way, traffic between, Oak and Lee, with "the northbound traffic on southbound1 on .Campbell. v In recommending 'the .one-way traffic, Mr. Messier told'the coin- nission that present, twb- traffic constituted -a fire hazard as well as a traffic'bol lecfe, and o be donel He "furtHeir tbUi' Commission Uiat -a previous coni- arission had studied the. problem the above jmmendatioris1 Jbut Jon after ordering Ahe nade the that .the' recom- aiendatiott be on" a -trial oasis and" that after fair.trial period, the commission review the situation. The commission .voted Cot to contribute to the. United "Fund drive, with Commissioner Taylor .assenting. The city has been con- tributing per'yeat to the-Bed Cross and1 Mr. Taylor said' he felt the city should give at- least that much, to the United Fund; JWell Pump Bid-' A bid by the 'Southern Engine and Pump company to repair the pump on. the No. 1 well was ac- cepied. The bid calls for a com- plete overhaul of the pump as- sembly at a cost of Mr. Messier -estimated that the lation of the pump, the cost' of impairing the poinp and expenses already incurred in pulling the pump would'amount to "between and Mr. Messier was instructed to get bids on an engine overhaul for the police car. Dr. Lebermao presided at the meeting of the commission with all members present, including John Wbitley, Mrs. H. M. Laffer- ty, Dewey Chapman and "Weldon Taylor. Sunday Singing At Shiloh Church The regular second Sunday singing wiU convene at the Shi- loh Nazarene church Oct. 12, at 2 p.im. Several visiting singers are ex- pected. The public has a cordial invi- tation to attend. MRd. HENDLRSON McDOWELL, registration ciiairman, ana mrs. W. X. Lron, who was in charge of luncheon reservations for the Third District Board meeting and President's parley In Com- merce Thursday, are shown checking last details of the meeting. They represent Jthd many Commerce women who have been working behind the scenes to have everything in N HWSPAPER RRCHIVE   

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