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Valley Star Monitor Herald Newspaper Archive: April 26, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Valley Star Monitor Herald

Location: Brownsville, Texas

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   Valley Star-Monitor-Herald (Newspaper) - April 26, 1942, Brownsville, Texas                               VALLEY, SUNDAY Cents TKZ WEATHER Warm FINAL' mattw poil oMIc. to THIRTY-FOUR PAGES TODA-V APRIL 26, 1942 HARLINGEN, McALLEN, BROWNSVILLE, TEXASi Vol 5 No 40____________ Three-Pronged Japan Drive Threatens Allied Burma Center 4- 4- 4 4 4 4 4'4 4 44 U. S. LANDS TROOPS ON FRENCH ISLE ENEMY TANKS HURL ALLIED FORCES BACK Chinese Are Inflicting Heavy Casualties NEW DELKt. India The harcl-prp.wd Chinese defending the Allied left .flank counterattacked Saturday night to halt a Japanese drive six miles west of Tnunssyl. but the strongly-reinforced enemy struck furiously with tanks, artil- lery and plnnos on both jUles of their stalled comrades. The Japanese, striking through the Shan states within 100 mllc.i of devastated Mnndnlny. thrust for- ward In three columns around TiiunKK.vi In an effort to encircle the outnumbered tronps under Gen. Joseph W. Stllwell. U, S. A. Are Henry One Japanese spearhead which reached Hopong drove abruptly nr-rtheast In the direction of Lollcm, 22 miles away, while another col- umn sought tn move west and en- clrclo Taunggyl. Still a third unit was striking out 18 miles further weit of TnunSCyl. The Chinese, almost devoid of air support. Inflicted heavy casual- ties nnd captured several trucks nnrl other materiel. Heavy fighting also was reported In the center on the Slttang River front. and on the British-held right on the Irrawaddy. The Chinese of the center anc! their British Allies were reported officially tn have held their posi- tions. The central front Is south of Tiitkon and the British are drawn tip behind the Plnchnung River near the burned oil center of Ynn angyauna. liner With Monsoon The Japanese were attempting to overrun Burma and Isolate China before the steaming Monsoon of mid-day bogs down their mechanic td might. The fighting was confused, but It was apparent from the British communiques that the heaviest enemy pressure was applied agalnsl the Chinese of the left and center, commanded by The situation was most grave around Tnunggyl on the Knrcnni front In the southern Shan states where the Chinese have been push- pel back 80 miles, within 100 miles of the great city of Kipling's song Auto Ration Plan Is Being Relaxed n'ASHIXGTON' The Of- flcp of Prlco Administration relaxed automobile rationing regulations Saturday In nn effort to speed up j Price Administrator Leon Hend- erson said the action was taken in accordance with his plan to dis- pose of some -100.000 cars by next JVliirch, Icnvins; 1W.OOO In a govern- ment stock pile. Thus far. since ra- tioning March 2. sales have luBCod 40 per cent under The relaxed regulations leave tin- ehiinKccI the classes of persons eligi- ble to buy new automobiles. MacArthur Appears In Austrialian Fete MELBOURNE In his first public appearance since his arrival tn Australia. Gen. Douglas Mac- Arthur took part quietly Saturday In the observance of AIIZHC Day, the memorial clay of Australia, and pledged simply that the fighting men of the liind down under would have America's continued comrade- through their com- monwt-nlth's grave ordeal. The 'new commander In chief Allied headquarters, accompanied by his American. Australian lind Dutch aides, climbed the steps to the nation's and placed wreiith on flower-decked Remem- brance Rock. Japs Force Burma Defenders Back In Fierce Attacks Rotary Parley Pry or Gets Backing From Top Office KARLINGEN Local FotarUnt Saturday were preparing to send one of the larger Valley to the district Rotary conference in Austin Sunday. Monday and day with a local man, Roscoc Pryor, candidate for district governor. Hill Coekc, chairman of the on- 1o-Austin committee, that sev- eral auto loads of Rotarlans would make the trip to the capital from Harlingcn nnd the other Valley towns with clubs. A special train had been dlscuss- cd, but plans were dropped when It learned that a minimum of 125 tickets could not be sold from tiie Valley. Chartered buses are banned under war regulations that those who attend will to Austin oy private automobile, i Bay of Bengal flj fight for land approaches to LIVING COST TALKJS DUE FD To Give Congress Program-Outline high ad- ministration official said Saturday that President Roosevelt would make clear in his message to Con- gress next week on the high cost of living that he was opposed to suspension ot the 40-hour week law. The presidential message is ex pcctcd to outline a program call ing for freezing most commodity prices at about March 1 levels, drastic tuxes on war profits and possibly wage control. It is to be sent to Congress Monday. Later, the President expects to discuss the program in a radio address to the nation. Roosevelt was represented as tak Ing the attitude that since most war plants were employing shifts of 48 hours or longer, the issue involved in the dispute over the 40-hour law was one of pay that could be han- dled satisfactorily in any directive he might make to government agen- cies to keep wages In line with liv- ing costs. The law requires time and ono-htvU pay for work In excess of 40 hours a week. Furthermore, he was said to gard proposals to suspend or re- peal the law as being tantamount to changing the rules while the game is in progress. As for other labor questions, it was predicted the President would say such Issues as strikes and the open and closed shop were being worked out satisfactorily u n d t r existing agreements. A pronouncement of this nature, however ,wns not expected to quiet demands In Congress for restrictive labor legislation. Lawyers Attend State Meet TORT WORTH A militant drive In the State Bar of Texas against unethical attorneys and against persons attempting to prac- tice law under the guise of being lawyers was outlined here Satur- day In session of the association's officers and directors. Paul Brown of Harlingen, chair- man of a committee made up of the 21 district grievance committee chairmen of Texas, reported after the meeting that his committee had recommended to the directors that action be taken against all lawyers who are not registered under the state bar act. Those for the session in- cluded Claude E. Carter, Harlinecn. vice president; and Eugene N. Cat- lett, McAllen. Solons To Register In Draft Monday WASHINGTON the historic rotunda of the Capitol members of the House and Senate whoso ages range between 43 and 65 years will register Monday under the selective service act. Eleven Tcxans, including Speaker Rayburn. will go up to the booth to be placed there for the legisla- .oi's and provide the data concern- nt themselves required on the ler- ici application fo'rtni. Record Flood Level Sends Trinity River Over Levees By The Associated Press One of the big Trinity River levees near Trinidad broke Saturday afternoon, causing the waters to drop more than a foot. All of the Cotton Bolt Railroad's track through Cedar Bottom was under water, but trains were still going through. Thousands of sacks of sand were used to save the tracks and the Texas Power and Light Company's huge power plant The river stage at Trinidad was 48.4 feet at 4 p. m. It stood at 50 feet 6ar asked for motorboats to evacuate lowland residents At Fredericksburg, reports said a small cyclone struck the east portion of GiUespie county, totally destroying the homes of' S, W. Tunnell and Harry Tatsch and damaging other homes and barns in a narrow path 10 miles long. Six hundred persons were evacu- ated from lowlands in Waco as flood waters of the Brazos and the south and middle forks of the Hosque united at the central Texas city. Trinity Still Rlsinj Tlie Trinity at Dallas which rose to its highest since 1908 with a crest of 45.5 feet Tuesday, was forecast to reach a higher peak by Sunday, but still stay within the levees protecting downtown Dallas. "Awfully than earlier in the was the official pre- diction by U. S. Weather Man A. M. Hamrick. At Eagle Mountain Lake, second in Fort Worth's chain of three municipal wster supply lakes on the Trinity's west fork, .the spill- way overflow was seven feet deep. Spillway Crest Record Lake Dallas, the Dallas' water supply reservoir on the Eta Fork, was roaring 8.85 feet deep over the spillway and still rising at mid- at'ternoon. If 'it goes to 10 feet, water would pour through the emergency spillway. spillway crest was a record. The Trinity's east fork at Rock- wall continued to rise, spreading a brown flood over rich farm lands and uniting with the combined flows of the Elm anti West Forks below Dallas. The crest at Trinidad was the highest in history, and the outlook gloomy as the rise continu- ed upstream at Dallas. Gainesville's torrential 6.72 inch rain which flooded parts of 'that North Texas city above Lake Dallas aggravated the situation, but Den- (Conllnued on 2, Column J) Kraigher Visits Pan American Africa Head Returns BROWNSVILLE George- Kraigher, operations manager for1 Pan American's .African airlines, arrived in Brownsville unexpected- ly Saturday, but would not discuss his activities in connection with" the ferrying of U. S. airplanes and supplies across the South Atlantic. It is known, however, that Amer- ican pilots are operating a ferry service across the sea to Africa. Kraigher was called to New York by Pan American and the War De- partment for a conference and said he was able to sandwich in a tew extra- days for a trip to Browns- ville. He will leave here Monday, but would not say when would return to TROOPS CAN CROSS SOON Border Regulations To Be Lifted BROWNSVILLE Soldiers sta- tioned at the two army cavalry posts and two air fields will be able to cross over into Mexico within a week, according to a tele- gram received here Saturday from Congressman Milton H. West in Washington. "The adjutant general's office to- day is issuing instructions to com- manders of various army posts, along the border to permit men in uniform when off duty to visit Mex- ico -when in possession of proper pass from their commanding gen- the telegram said. "The men must return not later than 11 p. m. "It will take approximately week for instructions to reach des- tination and for'commanders of the posts- to issue the proper instruc- tions and cards." The men affected in the Valley will be those at Fort Brown, Brownsville, and Fort Ringgold, Rio Grande City, both cavalry the Harlingen Gunnery School and Moore Field, Mission, air corps schools. Matamoros and Keynosn will be the chief Mexican border cities which will visited by sol- diers. Malta Strikes Back At Raiders Of Axis CAIRO continuous Axis air raids, the battered little island of unsink- aMe "aircraft carrier" 60 miles from back Saturday at an enemy airdrome and a big mer- chant ship which was carrying sup- plies to Field Marshal Erwin Rom- msl's North African corps. The airfield bombed was at Com- isco in Sicily, whence most of. the German and Italian planes have flown against Malta in virtually ceaseless attacks for the last four months. The supply ship in the cen- tral Mediterranean i was reported probably hit by bombers, soaring from one of Malta's three air bases at Halfar, Luqa and Tahali. Mexico Head Visits EAGLE PASS W) Miguel Aleman, Mexico's secretary of state. visited here and at Piedras Negras Saturday, inspecting the new high- way that leads.to Saltillo, md lelt IOT Paso. RAF RAIDERS BLAST NAZIS OYERFRA1E Rostock Is B1 a zing After Attacks LONDON; (Sunday) The Royal Air Force daylight offensive over France reached a new peak Saturday with six large-scale on- slaughts in 11 hours in a fiery after- math to a second violent night at- tack on Rostock. The Germans retaliated by send- ing large numbers of bombers over the west of England Saturday night 'and early Sunday, cascading, hieh explosives and fire bombs on one town. Maintaining attacks over the long- est daylight raid period of the war, the RAF pounded targets at Cher- bourg, Le Havre, Calais and other between Saturday's dawn and sunset. New Nazi During these operations the fierc- est air battles of the year raged with swar. is of the latest type German fighters challenging the British at levels ranging up to five miles, high over a 250-niile The RAF took advantage of the lengthening daylight hours to .wage its massive offensive which forced the Germans to put into the air the greatest number of fighters encoun- tered during any one day of 1942. The success of these sweeps and the comparatively small British fighters and one bomber to indicate the Nazis, even'by straining to the limit, now are unable to muster enough fight- ers to match the RAF. German losses for the day ...were given officially by'.'the'British'" as eight fighters. Rostock Bard Hit While Spitfires and Hurricanes weaved and dived in dogfights. American-made Bostons unloaded their bombs on targets along the German-held coast even as Rostock, the important German Baltic port, still flamed and crumbled from its second straight Brjtish assault. Pilots of British fighter planes reported there was "tremendous fighting" Saturday high above France between British craft and formations of 10 and 20 German Messerschmitts and FockeWulf 109's, Germany's latest and best fighters. After the first retaliatory raids upon England Saturday night the Germans again sent over large for- mations around Saturday midnight, and the town they singled but ex- perienced a short, but sharp, attack, Altough bombs fell in residential districts no fatal casualties had been reported early Sunday. One enemy bomber was reported down- ed. Communications Are Hit In-addition to heavy attacks upon docks at Cherbourg and Le Havre, and a factory at Calais, the RAF's targets Saturday included communi- cations at Abbeville and military installations at numerous other places in France. "Enemy fighters were encounter- ed in strength during the attack on Abbeville, and there were, .manj' said the communique. Hardest blows however were dealt at Rostock, second of Hitler's great Baltic bases for the German, armies of Norway. Finland and northern Russia to be turned into a black wreck by British. bombs. Nearly a million pounds of explosives were used to blast that old town in two of the most violent Allied air raids of .the war, the British said. A German bomber was shot down off the northeast coast of England shortly after noon. Two other enemy planes flew over the south coast in the early morning hours, kill- ing one person with machine-gun fire. Their bombs dropped harmless- ly. Striking in perfect bombing weather, the RAF for the second (Continued on PflKC 2, Col. 5> Youth Given Award AUSTIN University of Texas Regents Saturday''awarded an advanced university fellowship of to Charles Van Berg of Mer- cedes. Men With Dependents Face Draft Call Soon Local Draft Given For More Drastic Action Now WASHINGTON Many men with may be sum- moned to military duty this summer in lirfe with the new instructions to local draft boards for "more action" to meet the growing man- power needs of the armed forces. Officials noted Saturday that the instructions of national selective service headquarters to the local boards followed estimates by Major General Lewis B. Hershey, the national director, that existing quotas of men immediately available to meet the expanding army's demands would be exhausted before fall. tt i, Furthermore, General George C. Marshall, army chief of staff, has predicted that summer will see army training of recruits stepped up to a month. In anticipation of the time when large numbers of men with depen- dents may have to be called, the Army has asked Congress for legislation providing government payments and allotments from soldiers pay to dependents A pending measure would provide a month for a wife and addition for each child; a month for one parent, or for Preliminary to calling men now deferred because of dependents, local boards were told to group those with families into two classes, those employed in essential war activities and those not so engaged. This new classifcation, it was directed, be applied first to those between 36 and 44, inclusive, who registered on February 18. Those deemed to be not engaged in essential activities will be the first selected when it becomes nec- essary to induct men with depen- dents. National headquarters also advis- ed that no deferment be allowed men who married since Pearl Har- bor, who took wives with the "pri- mary purpose" of avoiding military service or whose wives had been providing adequately for their own support, but who quit their jobs "for the primary purpose of afford- ing a basis for dependency defer- ment." Two Classes Set The memorandum itnt out by the board, however, emphasized that before men deferred for de- pendency are inducted "there will first' be selected all men who can be made available for military ser- vice under current policies and standards." The instructions established two classes for registrants deferred for 3A and 3B. Class 3A now is defined as "any registrant upon whose earnings one or more persons depend for sup- port in a reasonable manner and who is not engaged in an activity either essential to the war produc- tion program or essential to the support of the war effort." FDR To Register Clasi 33 is "any registrant upon whose earnings one or more per- sons depend for support ir. a reason- able manner and who is engaged in an activity either essential to the war production program or essen- tial to the support of the war ef- fort." Meanwhile, the selective service system proceeded with the regis- tration men in the 45 to 65 age group, eligible for possible non- combatant war duties. -As in pre- vious registrations, the period for registering was extended, in most states, to cover the week-end, with the final time set for Monday night. This group will include those men who were 45 on or before February 16 and who have not reached 65 by next Monday. President Roosevelt, who comes in this group, will register in the cabinet room at the White -House Monday morning., Hitler Will Speak On French LONDON re- ports said Saturdav night that Adolf Hitler had returned to Ber- lin and was expected to call a meet- ing of the Reichstag make a statement on German-French relations. A Reuters dispatch from Vichy quoted the Swedish newspaper Nya Dagligt Allehanda as saying German newspapers published re- ports that the Kroll Opera scene of Reichstag to be closed, indicating session is imminent. The Swedish paper also said Hitler was from the front. back in Berlin MOORE FIELD PILOTKILLED Two Planes Crash In Mid-Air Saturday MOORE FIELD The second mid-air crash at Moore Field within two days Saturday took' the life of Aviation Cadet John K. Simmons, 22, son o? Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Sim- mons of Fulton, S. D. It was the field's third fatality since the advanced flying program was started. On Routine Flight Cadet Richard J. Shipway, Jr., parachuted to the ground after the planes collided at a. m., about three miles west of the field while the pilots were on a routine train- ing flight, the public relations of- fice announced. Shipway suffered slight bruises.. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Shipway of Sioux City, la. Both Cadets were flying PT-lS's, primary training ships. It was believed Simmons tried to bail out after the collision, but that his 'chute caught on the plane. Graduate tn June The two Cadets were members of class 42-E, due to complete their advanced training in June. Simmons' body -will be forward- ed to his parents' home Sunday night by Martin-Nelson Funeral home of McAllen. In a mid-air crash Thursday aft- ernoon, Cadet Douglas E. McCassey of Syracuse, N. Y., was instanUy killed. Cadet Philip O. Works, Jr., flying the other plane, was released later in the day from base hospital after receiving treatment for bruis- es, press relations said. Free French Cheer Landing Of The arrival of United States troops in New Cale- donia was described by Free French source Saturday as a "high- ly welcome step to insure the com- mon defense of the Allied lifelines to Australia and New Zealand." He said the Free French agreed fully to participation of the United States in the defense of the island and that Gen. Charles de Gaulle had been in communication fre- quently with the United States commander there. Texan In RAF Was Turned Down By US SANTA FE, N. M. RAF Pilot Bill Daley of Amarillo, Texas, who shot down Nazi transport plane Friday in a many, enlisted in raid over Ger- the British, air force after being rejected by the United States Air Corps, his aunt saiu Saturday. "They he was color said Mrs. Mary Burlington of Santa Fe. "but he was determined to fight, so he went to England." Mexican Immigration Officer Arrested On Attempted Ammunition Smugg I i n g BROWNS V I L L E about 32 old. placed in Cameron county Jail Saturday, night following federal which accused him of attempting to violate the federal export control act. Customs officials said Mur- go would be brought before U. S. Commissioner Carlos Watson here, probably Sun- day, for a According to a reliable source, Murgo was stopped on the Gateway Bridge'Saturday afternoon on a tip and his automobile searched. Customs officers said rounds of ammunition were found concealed in the uphol- stery of the rear seat. Murgo is a Mexican Immi- gration Service Inspector .at- tached to the International bridge In Maitmoros. He has been in Matamoros for the past six years and is well known among peace of- ficer circles here. Officers would not specu- late as to use the am- munition was intended nor at to where It might have been obtained. -It was understood that Fed- eral Bureau of Investigation agents were working on the case. FREE FRENCH TOGETHELP IN DEFENSES Outcry From Vichy Expected Soon WASHINGTON The Unit- ed States announced Saturday it had landed troops in New Caledonia assist the French in the de- fense of that vitally stratecic island which flanks the supply route be- tween this country and The action, which the War De- partment ssid w3S taken "with approval of local authorities." the first announcement of Ameri- can troops moving into French ter- ritory. Tile size of the American- force was not disclosed. In view of the new collaboration- ist regime of Pierre Lavol at Vichy of the previous angry out- burst from Vichy when the United States sent a consul-general to Brazzaville in Free French Equa- torial expected ft new outcry from Vichy over troops in New Calendonia. Relations Relations between the Washing- ton and Vichy governments have steadily deleiorated since announce- ment that Laval W5S returning to power. Ambassador William D, Leahy has been called to Washing- ton for consultations. This country has enunciated policy of maintaining relation? with French citizens who are in actual control of French territories. 'Thus, the way for the troop land- ing in New Caledonia wai paved last month with an announcement by the State Department thst United States would aid French forces there in the defense of the island. From a military standpoint. New Caledonia is of utmost to tlie United Nations. Lying 800 miles east of Australia, it in close to the route for the ships carrying men and munitions to the Austral- ian bases for the projected offensive, against the Japanese. VxJue As Air Itf value as an air base was rec- ognized even before the southward, surge of the Japanese focused st- tention on the islands off Australia, Pan-American Airways chose Nou- mea, the capital, as a port of call for its San Francisco-Auckland, New Zealand, route.1 The landing of American troops on the island represented, in a manner; the winning of a race with Japan's invading armies. For the Japanese have been moving steadily tast and southward from Java, nearer and nearer to the trans Pacific route from United States to Australia. The Nipponese now are believed to be about miles northwest of New Caledonia on the island of New Britain and they claim to have taken two other smaller islands slightly east of New Britain. France's Texas Head Resigns His Office SAN ANTONIO As result of Pierre Laval's ascenson to power in down-trodden France, Alexandre Jouffray, French consular agent in. Ssn Antonio has offered his resig- nation to the consul general of France at New Orleans. "1 cannot any longer lend tin- cere collaboration to the actual minister of foreign affairs, as small as this collaboration may be. be- cause my convictions are entirely opposed ac to the road to follow in order to save France from the condition In which she finds her- self now. I still have full confi- dence in Marshal Petain, my for- mer chief at Verdun, but I am afraid he is no longer the absolute' master of the destiny of Jouffray's statement said. WEATHER FOR VALLEY: Little In tempera- ture Sunday. THE TIDES: ffiph tides will occur ftt e.m. p.m. on the Valley const (Bunday. Low tides will occur at a.m. and RIVER FORECASTS: river will con- tinue to rise nt with the rlRe rencliinir the mouth of the river Sunder morninit. It will nt and Mfrredfj; Sundny. BUWRlftc Sundny t..m. p.m. Tifrt indicate vecond lint 24 hnum; third, rmti nr melted nttw dnrhir lint 13 heurk ending at CWr yolerdny-. Albuquerque. N. M, AmnrlUo. TeX. AllfinlH, Ga...... Brownsville fifi SB 86 e 95 El -82 Corpui Chrlstl 86 58 83 85 Denver, Colo Dodge City, Port Worth Tex Jacksonville. Kansas City, Mo 75 Laredo, Tex New Orleans. 76 New York City 72 North PJattc. Neb, ..51 Oklahoma City 75 81. Louin- Mo. D. C, 55 VOTE: of precipitmti tham lack aot fUtoUtHiC Sg 42 58 74 R2 72 34 40 00 4S 55 tH 62 47 44- tft 5R .it   

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