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Valley Star Monitor Herald Newspaper Archive: July 30, 1939 - Page 1

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Publication: Valley Star Monitor Herald

Location: Brownsville, Texas

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   Valley Star-Monitor-Herald (Newspaper) - July 30, 1939, Brownsville, Texas                               WXATHaB Partly Cloudy Weather for the Valley Sunday will be partly cloudy. No material chance should occur in the river during the next 24 hours. VALLEY SUNDAY NITQR M M fflw Tuu, 10 Cents FINAL EDITION All news of the World and the Valley. Best Feat- ures and World's Best Comics. Vol. XXX, No. 99 HARLINGEN, McALLEN, BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS, SUNDAY, JULY SO, 1939 THIRTY-EIGHT PAGES TODAY GOVERNMENT INTERFERENCE IS CUT Newspaper Clippings; Arouse Senate SOLON LINKED WITH SALE OF MEXICO'S OIL Investigation Sought By Bridges WASHINGTON W Senator Bridges (R-NH) touched off an angry ex- change in the senate Satur- day by reading newspaper Btorics which he said linked Senator Guffey (D-Pa) with persons who negotiated the sale of oil from United States properties seized by Mexico. Bridges followed up the news- paper quotation with an announce- ment that he intended to seek a investigation of the "entire Mexican oil affair." Stories Termed False Quffey, his voice husky with emotion, termed the newspaper stories "100 per cent falst and a malacious, character destroying He." A half-dozen of his colleagues protested bitterly that Bridges had violated senate rules, "impugning the character of a member of this body." The New Hampshire Republican denied he was making any charge against Guffey. and Senator La- foilette who was pre- siding, ruled that he had not vio- lated the senate regulation. .Jlscussed Bridges interrupted a droning de- bate on the lending bill to read the clippings, at a time when the senate floor was nearly empty. The exchange that followed brought aenators hustling to the floor from nearby cloakrooms. Referring to a provision in the lending bill to finance exports to Latin-America, Bridges discussed relations between this country and Mexico. He charged that unnamed high officials of this administration had "encouraged and even commended the establishment of Communism In and that this had led expropriation of American and BATTLESHIPS, BABIES CLAIM ATTENTION IN WAR-CONSCIOUS EUROPE By The Associated Press Battleships babies claimed mttentlon In war- eonsclons Europe In Enfland for during critical months ahead, and babies In France to offset a decline in population. Harvest time was at hand, too. and In many minds there has been fear that once the men drop the scythe they mlfht have to turn to funi. August September have been tagged the danger period. Great Britain, with expanded naval maneuvers arranged to coincide with the period of possible tension next month, put ships under steam for training- cruises and firing practice In advance of the mld-AuiQit war games. The French government, alarmed at more deaths than births last year, offered cash bonuses for babies and put a tax on bachelors and childless couples to pay the prizes. While France exhorted her eitizeni to produce more babies, proud Netherlanders heard with Joy that a second child was expected In mid-August by Princess Juliana. And the hearty Netherlanders hoped that the baby would be a first male heir to the throne of their tiny kingdom in almost a century. Friction between British and Japanese soldiers flared once again in Shanghai. A dispute over the international settlement boundary, where the Jap- anese strung wire barricades for a mile and a half, brought Japanese with bayonets face to face with British Highlanders but they did not clash. The Japanese held four Britons and their truck for two and a half hours while officers negotiated to get them released. Meanwhile the London government instructed its ambassador to Tokyo to complain again about the continuing anti-British demonstrations In China. At Pehtalho, seacoast resort northeast of Tientsin, Chinese coolies said they were paid the equivalent of three American cents and a bottle of soda pop to parade against the British. London heard reports that Tokyo municipal authorities were arranging anti-British rallies for Monday around the building where diplomats have been trying to settle the Tientsin blockade trouble. Official circles In London indicated dissatisfac- tion with progress of the Tokyo negotiations. Pres- sure for a stronger stand has grown since the United States denounced her 1911 trade treaty with Japan Wednesday. The initialing of a new commercial treaty by Japan and Germany was Interpreted in Tokyo as enabling the Japanese government to save face at home after the shock of the Washington more. The Japanese foreign office gave the German treaty unusual attention by Issuing a statement that "Japan will be able to get an augmented supply of articles from Germany required in times of peace as well as war." Along with the baby bonuses France launched group of decree laws to strengthen the nation for what Finance Minister Paul Reynaud called "the present white war of nerves" and against any future clash of arms.. The new laws include one to strengthen the watch for spies and another to restrict profits on arms. LENDING BILL DEBATE LIMIT SET FOR WEEK House Adds Slashes For Measure Faces Charges LEWIS BLAST RIDICULED BY SON OF FDR Senator Joseph Guffey above, Saturday ids-linked with persons who negotiated sale of oil from United States properties seized by Mexico in a verbal blast from Senator Bridges, JHBrltlsh oil properties. Clippings Read Bridges then began reading clippings from St. Louis (Post-Dis- patch) and New York (Herald-Tri- bune) newspapers that told of re- ported sales and barter of oil from the seized properties The clippings said Guffey made trip to Mexico City in 1937, be- fore the seizure, with Walter A. Jones, Pittsburgh oil man and poli- tician, and that Jones was associat- ed with W. R. Davis, "freelance oil" operator, who was credited with disposing of oil to Germany. Guffey and Jones, the papers said, conferred after the oil pro- perty seizures with Eduardo Suarez, Mexican minister of finance, in a Washington hotel. GINS REPORT 55.276 BALES Valley Cotton Rush Is Increasing Man Is Held Police Sav Suspect IHad Marihuana man. believed by officers to be one of the ringleaders In marihuana traffic of the upper Valley, was nrrcsted Saturday after- noon by Police Chief Noah Cannon and Deputy Sheriffs George Ingram of Pharr and Ben Brooks of Mer- cedes near the swimming pool south of McAllen. Officers said the man had 20 rolls of marihuana when captured. Cannon 'said the man was riding In a truck returning from Hidalgo when arrested. He was said to have made a statement to District At- Tom L, Hartley admitting possession of the marihuana which he said he obtained in Hidaglo. Of- ficers, however, were of the opinion he secured the weed in Reynosa. Cannon said charges were expected to filed Monday. Heavy Rains Hit East Texas Area (ffi began falling late Saturday over deep east Texas counties, breaking a drouth of nearly two months duration in some of them. Nacogdochej, Shelby, Angelina, San Augustine, and Rusk counties reported UM downpouri beneficial Lower Rio Grande Valley' 1939 cotton gin- ning total was believed near the half-way mark Saturday night, as 74 gins in the sector's four counties reported a total of bales for the season to date. The week ending Saturday, with bales, was easily the heav- ies' single week to date, exceeding by bales the previous week when bales were processed by Valley gins. Ginnlngs Indicated Saturday night that some parts of the Val- ley have passed picking peak, while in other parts of the area, cotton men said the peak had not been reached. Cameron county showed the larg est increase of the sector during the week just past, boosting it's season total from bales of Sat urday a week afo to bales with 24 gins reporting, a week total of bales compared to gain of only 5.416 bales during the preceding week. Hidalgo county, with 28 gins re- porting, continued to hold the lead among counties with a bale total, showing a total for the past week of bales compared to bale total for the preceding week. Willacy county apparently had reached its season peak Saturday night when 21 gins reported bales, indicating a ginning figure for the week of bales com- pared to the higher bale total of the preceding week. Stnrr county's three gins totaled bales Saturday night with (Clntlnned on t, Column 4) Damage To Labor Is Seen By Elliott FORT WOr.TH The blast of John L. Lewis, president of tfie CIO, against Vice President Gar- ner "may have done irreparable damage t. the fine cause of labor advancement in this El- liott Roosevelt, son of the .'resi- dent, said in a radii, talk Satur- day. "Quite a few people throughout the United States don't happen to agree with Mr. Lewis and a great many people who are straight 'alk- ing. patriotic Americans are begin- ning to get slightly irritated at people such as John L. Lewis and i Representative Dewey Short of Missouri, who get on their feet and scream personal invectives at the I Heads of our young Roosevelt said. "Mr. Dewey Shcrt is the only elected Republican -epresentative of his distric in Missouri, and as such is suposed to uphold the dignity of the people whom he represents. Mr, John L. Lewis is the self-elected czar of the Con- gress of Industrial Organizations, which represent millions of high minded, patriotic workers. "It's about time that leaders of this type learn that they can dis- agree with the heads of our state and have the blessings of all the people of the United States, just so loni as they do so v. ithout re- sorting to unfair, underhanded personal attacks upon the personal lives and integrity of our leaders. "I would feel just as complete a revulsion of feelings for any Democrat who launched a person- al attack on a Republican leader in this country In my opinion, such leaders of the opposition to the Democratic pal Ly as Vanden- berg, McNary, Landon, Hoover, and I Dewey are men of the highest char- j acter, with love of country and pa-1 Commanders Defy Jap Orders Side by side stand Admiral Harry E. Yarnell, commander of U. S. Pacific fleet, and Major General Frank Keith Simmons, left, new commander of British defense In China. Both are concerned over nationals, Yarnell bluntly having told Japan that U. S. ships would go wherever necessary to protect Americans in spite of Japan's attempt to bar foreign vessels. FOREST FIRES THREATENING Four Youths Killed In Huge Blaze OGDEN. sections hearts. I feel the same way about the Franklin D. Roosevclts, the James A. Farleys, the John Nance Garners, and the Carter Glasses. "Therefore, when a personal at- tack i launched against any one of these leaders, regardless of his political thinking, by a leader of millions of men or of thousands of men and women, 1. can only hang my head in 'iame and shudder to think of what the future holds for this country. TRUCK UNITS FICHTORDER Modification Sought On Highway Ban (Details on Page 2) DALLAS A delegation of BROWNSVILLE HEARING SET FOR QUARREL Restraining Order Is Issued By Judge temporary restraining order was issued by j Judge James S. Graham Saturday, restraining the issuance of com- missions or credentials to the elec- tion judges appointed by the city commission to hold Brownsville's August 29 charter amendment elec- tion. Hearing for the petition filed Friday afternoon has'been'set for Wednesday. August 2, and the tem- porary restraining order is extend- ed until then. The temporary re- straining order, not granted at the time the petition was presented, was granted Saturday when the petition was again. The plea for injunction named as plaintiffs the election judges ap- pointed by Mayor R, B. Rentfro to hold the charter amendment elec- tion, and Mayor Rentfro. Named as defendants were City Commis- sioners Clarence Colgin. Royce Russell and Keith Tugglc, City Sec- retary Kermit Cromack, City Man- ager Robert Runyon, Chief of Police John McRay and the elec- tion officials named by the city commission to hold the charter amendment election. The petition asked that a tem- porary writ of injunction be issued restraining the three comr.iissioners and th city secretary from issuing commissions and credentials to de- fendants named as election offi- cials by the three commissioners, and from interfering in any man- ner with the plaintiffs appointed as election officials by Mayor Rent- fro. It asked that the election offi- cials named by the three commis- sioners be restrained from acting as election officials in the election, and from interfering with the con- duct of the election in any man- Wins In Vote Senator Mlllard Tydings, (D- above, won bis fight to get the Senate to adopt his amend- ment to prohibit political contri- butions by labor unions or other organizations except with the foreknowledge of their The amendment was to the Ad- ministration's lending bill. WPA CEASES DISMISSALS Lcng-Time Employes Will Remain Just as cause of Lewis' labor, blast hurt the Representative Short's recent attack on the Presi- dent on the floor of the House un- doubtedly did untold damage to- ward the respect the people of the United States hold for congress." FIRE CALL ANSWERED The fire depart- ment answered a call at the Crane Company, 221 North C, late Sat- urday afternoon to extinguish a small grass fire behind the bulld- ng. No damage was reported, from rainless weeks and searing leading motor freight truck opera-! W askprt fhat Pitv Manager Bun heat, were threatened Saturday j tors will seek in Austin early next! d Cy Run' night by fires which killed four in j week modification of the Texas Nevada and caused unestimated Railroad Commission's Sunday and damage ir. several other states. In addition, lightning storms which brought little rain, killed two, one in Oregon and one In Kentucky. Four Civilian Conservation Corps enrollees burned to death when a brush and timber fire they were fighting shifted and cut off their retreat. A fifth youth was missing and feared dead. The bodies of Ernest R, Tippin, 21, Oswego, Kan.; George J, Ken- nedy, 22, New York; Frank W. Barker, 20, Brooklyn, and Walter James, 18, Ridgewood, N. Y., were taken to Winnemucca, Nev., the regional, service office here announced. Pacific northwest fires, 85 of which were started by rainless thunderstorms, spread over thou sands of acres of timberland, but for the most part were under con- trol. MAN PREFERS DEATH TO JAIL TERM HOUSTON Rather than face his bathing beauty wife when she found he was an ex-convict, H. O. Floyd, 45, of Birmingham, Ala., plunged five floors from a police station window Saturday and died a short time later. Floyd, a magazine salesman, had been fingerprinted by police after his arrest on a charge of having passed forged cheek for His wife, who claimed to have won beauty title five tlmea 19Zg, was held on a charge of having forged cheek, which was given three days ago to a tewifi MHB operator. Mrs, laid she was the former Reba Lee of Memphis, Tenn., and gave her age aa 37. She Mid she won the beauty titles tinder the name of Reba Wllkei. After E. E. Whlttlngton. a clerk In the police identification bu- reau, had taken Floyd's finger- print! the ex-convict remarked: "Those fingerprints will ihow I have been in trouble before and my wife will ba lore when she finds It out." Then, Whlttlngton said, Floyd confided he had served on a one to ten year prison sen- la Uliaoti for eiBbeiile- ment. Floyd be was pa- roled later. As Mrs. Floyd started to a jail cell, Floyd uked permission to cay good bye. A moment later ho from the window. A Justice of the peace gave an Inquest verdict of suicide. Mrs. Floyd aald she met her husband this spring at a Memphis party given In her honor after she had won another bathing beauty contest. She said they were married at Cleveland, on May 19. Floyd told police' he formerly lived in 01 holiday ban on commercial trucks, Carl Phinney, attorney for the group, said Saturday. Phinney said the Commission would be asked to modify the or- der so that those truck lines now operating regular Sunday schedules on five Texas highways affected may continue to do so. "The concession would not put more than 40 extra trucks on the five Phinney said, "and could in no manner interfere with the Commission's effort to make the highways safer." A dtcision to seek the modifica- tion was reached after a series of conferences here in which motor freight truck lines representatives participated. Two-Year-Old Girl Is Killed In Crash LUBBOCK Two-year-old Jamie Sue, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Shepherd of Brownfield was killed near here this afternoon when an automobile left the slip- pery highway and somersaulted 150 feet, Ferrell Shepherd, 28, uncle of the child, of near Lubbock and Mrs. Scott Dalton, 40, of Brownfield, suf- fered broken backs. They were in critical condition Saturday night yon and Chief o" Police McRay and their agents and employes be restrained from interfering with the election officials appointed by Mayor Rentfro in the conduct of the election, and from interfering in any way with conduct of the election. Also asked was a mandatory writ commanding City Secretary Cro- mack to issue at once the commis- sions and credentials empowering the election officials appointed by Mayor Rentfro to act at the charter amendment election. The petition asked that the tem- porary injunction be made per- en C.I. 1) GARRETT TO RUN CORPUS CHRISTI Gabe Garrett, local publisher who was unsuccessful in a race for congress from the 14th district last year, has announced that he is again seeking the office which is now held by Richard M. Kleberg. The WPA stopped dismissing long-time em- ployes Saturday pending final con- gressional action on a proposal to modify the relief act's requirement that they be laid off by Septem- ber 1. Colonel F. C. Harrington, com- missioner, telegraphed all state work relief administrators to sus- pend action in dismissing persons who had 38 consecutive months or more of WPA employment. A provision of the new relief act, Harrington said, callei' upon him to drop approximately 650.000 persons, other than war veterans, by Sep- tember I. Under the act they could apply for re-certification after a 30-day interval but would bn rele- gated to the status of new relief applicants. Job priority would be given to persons certified for re- lief for three months or more, but who never before had been on the work relief payroll. Because of the general program of relief reduc- tion, Harrington said this made chances slim that long-term em- ployes once dismissed, ever would be taken back. Harrington declined to say im- mediately whether employes al- ready dropped would be reinstated. CHANGE PASSED Amendment Is Voted By Upper House WASHINGTON _ W) The Senate approved Satur- day night, 45 to 24, an amendment to the admini- stration's 4 0 0 0 lending bill designed to pre- vent government interfer- ence with existing private enterprise. Soon after adopting this pr al by Senator 'Mahoney the chamber agreed to limit debate on the lending measu-e and ed unti: Monday. Debates Limited The agreement, limiting senators to 15-minute speeches, was obtain- ed by the administration leadership after many previous attempts to hasten a vote had proved Sentiment for reduction of the lending program spread from tha Senate to the House banking com- mittee during the day, bringing; about an reduction in. the measure at that group's hands. The banking committee recom- mended House passage of a cur- tailed bill-carrying total of BUI Already Cut The bill before the senate al- ready had been cut down, by coalition of Republicans and Demo- crats, to When first introduced by administration lead- ers, the legislation carried 000.000. Before it recessed, the Senate ac- cepted ay a voice vote an amend- ment by Senator Tydings to prohibit political contributions by labor unions or other organiza- tions except with foreknowledge of their members. Tydings indicated during debate that the amendment was aimer' at such loans as the advance made to the Democratic party in 1936 by John L. Lewis' United Mine Workers. Proposal Accepted Acceptance of the O'Mahoney proposal came alter hours-long de- bate, during which Senator Nor- ris charged that its prac- tical effect would be "to make it absolutely impossible for a muni- cipality to construct an electric light plant." The O'Mahoney amendment pro- vides that none of the proposed o" public work loans could go for projects in any field which private enterprise already v.'as serving adeuqately. It pro- vides also, however, that if the owners of a private business refuse a "reasonable" public offer to purchase, then government funds could be used for the construction of a competing enterprise, O'Mahoney. chairman of the (Continued 
                            

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