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Valley Star Monitor Herald Newspaper Archive: January 2, 1938 - Page 1

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Location: Brownsville, Texas

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   Valley Star-Monitor-Herald (Newspaper) - January 2, 1938, Brownsville, Texas                               The Weather Cooler Today For the Rio Grande Val- ley: Pair Saturday night and Sunday; cooler early Sunday with gentle to moderate northerly to eas- terly winds on the coast. VALLEY SUNDAY MONITDR-SHerald Final Edition 10 Cents All the news of the World and the Valley. Best Feat- ures and World's Best Comics. Vol. 21 A VALLEY-OWNED INSTITUTION HARLINGEN, McALlEN, BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS, SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 1938 FULL LEASED WIRE ASSOCIATED PRESS THIRTY-EIGHT PAGES SHARP GAIN SHOWN IN CITRUS INCOME 4- THE LIGHT "GIVl LIGHT AHD THE PfOPLE WILL FIND THEIR OWN WAY" THE found His mission greatly handicap- ped by those in Authority who would spell that word with a capital A. Th'ey were not authorities in the sense in their Don't Worry About 1938- Babson Rose Day Is Planned to have their opinions re-j spected. They were in the saddle and riding with spurs, I to use a western expression. They had built themselves f .into positions of domination and were able, through so- RECESSION NOT TO BE SERIOUS EXPERTCLAIMS Revival Of Business Is Forecast ABSON PARK, Mass. We mre not entering a major depres- 1938 will see a resumption of the upward trend which In 1933. The first quarter may be worse than the early cial and ecclesiastical pres-1 months of 1931; but later in the Ciai ana ii vcar Iook for a substantial re- tige. to compel the acquis- Do not confusc cur cence of others in their op-[ inions. Those opinions might be right or wrong. With a; frown they could drive the recalcitrant out of the charm- Bowla! II owl a! COTTON BOWL Rice 28; Colorado 14 ROSE BOWL California 13; Alabama 0 SUGAR BOWL. Santa Clara 6; Louisiana State 0 SUN BOWL West Virginia 7; Texas Tech 6 ORANGE BOWL Auburn 6; Michigan State 0 EAST-WEST East 0; West 0 rent sharp recession with a ma- jor depression! Payrolls, prices, stocks, real estate, and jobs should all be on their way to new highs by the end cf 1938. This December presents a tre- ed circle of the elect. Their i mcndous contrast with a year ago. word as to what was the law, it the law. True, Rome ruled, in sense. The Herods nulled before liver. were taken. But R n system had sue'1 hold upon the Jewish people that Rome found it un- wise to defy it. The members of the Sanhcclrin were s t r o n o r Man- Herod, They controlled public "dcntiment. Herod tnstirrec- tioiv Th.' ancient Jewish -.hcocraUc group slill ruled. Lile had-temporarily the Jewish, religion. a pure n po'itical must be toil- TEXAS STARS DIM LUSTRE OF 'WHIZZER' 14 LOSE LIVES IN TEXAS ON NEW YEAR DAY 6 Valleyites Hurt In Collision Then, the old year was riding into the history books on a great wave of optimism and hope. "Good times" Smothered By Rice- 28-14 lay over the horizon of 1937. The dark years c-J 1929-1935 were drowned out in a hurricane of wage boosts, dividend extras, and gigan- tic Christmas trade. My forecast at that time was: "1937 will be the first year of real prosperity since 1929. The entire year's gain should average seven to eight per cent above 1935." 193; Year of Prosperity Prosperity dia come. Business did average 7 per cent above 1936. This past August the Babsonchart stood at 8 per cent above Normal, than it had been for seven But after Labor Day the Mas ic out It had become 'formalism. The spiritual j bigfier years. which had been brewing all year, suddenly struck. High taxes, political muddling, labor agitation, and thin stock markets created a tornado of distrust and fear. The quality has a way of re- j rcslllt hns bcen one of the sharpest ligions when formulism and dogma busincss declines on record. The became autocrats. That was not true nlone of the Jewish faith at the time of Christ's coming. It is truu in the Christian churches of today. Babsonchart is now 19 per cent below Normal. The current gloom will continue to hurt business during the early months of 1938. But while activity will average at least 15 per cent be- low the first quarter of 1937, it should not fall much below current levels. During this discouraging TENDENCY is to substitute the law for the spirit: dogma for spiritual experience. This ul- timately empties church and syna- gogue alike. But the "system" long j neriod the base for a resumption of perpetuates its power. People ncsi- the upward trend will be laid. The tate to defy religious Authority. It spring rally in 1938 will be much is easier to accept the formalism and ignore the lack of spirituality. So the Jewish faith was dying, but still hud political power. So mnny ot DALLAS Two irrepressible Rice Institute sophomores, Ernie Lain and Olie Cordill, unfolded all their cunning to crush Whizzer White and his hitherto unbeaten Colorado mates. 28-14, before Cotton Bowl fans Saturday. Stunned at the outset by White's ramblings that brought two quick touchdowns and a comfortable Colo- rado lead, the Southwest Confer- ence kings stormed back behind HARLINGEN The first day of 1938 saw six persons injured in one collision, and none injured in two others, as the total for 1937 remained at 88 dead on highways. Ray Meyer, McAllen; Bonnie Belle Bryant, Har'Jingen; Mr, and Mrs. Carlton Traxler and Mr. and Mrs. Elvin Traxler received medi- cal attention for minor hurts suf- fered in >i car-truck collision Sat- urday at 2 a. m. when their auto crashed with a truck operated by Antonio Cano, one and one-half miles west of La Feria on Highway No. 4. None was injured in an acciden at p. m. in Brownsville, nor in a Friday night collision on the Briggs-Coleman Road near Harlin- gcn. (By the Ainoclntfd Preii) Fourteen persons lost their lives by violence in Texas as the New Year arrived. The toll from highway accidents was ten. Four died from gun wounds. An accidental shot from a rifle while hunting was fatal to Curtis Clyde Hutchison, 31, of Prairie Hill near Waco, who died Saturday. J. E. Beatty, 19, of Bronte, died in'a Lain's pitching arm and CordiJl's 13an Angelo twinkle toes to bury the Buffaloes. I wound also received while hunting. In the last three periods rado was no match for the burly Owl crew that punched the Buffalo defense for 422 yards, four touch- downs and another threat that died on the one-foot stripe. Too much Rice line was the an- after pass swer. The rangy Texans, White's first running and splurge that netted settled down to an touchdown, afternoon of stronger than seasonal. Good 1938 Trend By next Fourth of July, business our modern churches arc dying but j should have recovered fror.. a third gtill in part control our social and political behavior. Jesus thought the Jewish faith needed revitalizing and he under- took the lask. Instead of achieving it. He merely brought about His to a half of its late 1937 loss. The revival will pick up momentum during the second half. How far it will go, it is, of course, impossible to say now. Nevertheless, as a long shot, it would not surprise me if own crucifixion. His vital new j the 1937 peaks were equalled be- faith was forced to find expression in a new group which Gradually won recognition for itself. Such also is the explanation of how Protestantism came into being. It accounts for our multiplicity of protestant faith. As spirituality dies in one group, a few indefatig- able spirits, mightily moved by their spiritual warmth, seek a new group which will give them a more congenial spiritual clrma'e in which to live, Thoso attached to church groups. where Authority has cooled spirit- ual ardor, but strengthened the psy fore next Christmas! Because of the poor first quar- ter of the new yr r, the average of general business for 1938, how- ever, will be slightly roitfrhly 10 per cent average for 1937. The Important point next year is the trend. A poor start (but not much lower than current an Improv- ing quarter, and then a sharp upward surge during the final four or five months is my idea of the 1938 business pattern. In making these estimates I am counting on cooperation from Wash- stubbornness, yielding only 87 yards in all. Almost a one-man team, White, the scholarly all-America sensation, did everything they said he would. He seized a opening down in three minutes. Downfield he broke over the Rice tackles with thrusts from the short punt formation, finally passing to ng. Dwane Adams, 27, a dairy man- break soon after the a touch- (See Rice Defeats, Page 10, Col. 2) DEATH CLAIMS BEN T. KELLY Services At P h a r r Planned Sunday PHARR Thompson Kelly. automobile went out of control. ager, was found shot to death Sat- urday at his home near Groesbeck. The coroner witheld a verdict. At Clarksville officers said an autopsy showed Oscar Ward, 52, whose body was recovered from the Clarksville Country Club lake Fri- day had been shot in the head. Two were killed in automobile accidents at El Paso; Mrs. Canuta Garcia, 70, and James H. Williams, 50, dying after being struck by auto- mobiles. Another, Jesus Mendoza, 5, was struck and killed by a truck at San Antonio. H. A. Wilkerson of Dallas died Saturday of injuries received in an automobile collision just before midnight Friday when five others were injured. Epitacio Davilla, 60, of San Antonio, also was fatally in- jured in an automobile accident. Lee Manor, 65, died near Austin when his automobile overturned into a creek full of water; Ruth Un- derbrink, 13, of Kingsville, was killed when she was hit by a truck; Miss Caroline Bartlett, 75, of Hous- ton died when she was struck by an automobile, Jose Garcia, a farmer, was killed in an automobile collision at Fal- furrias, and H. T, Bridges, 62, of Wichita Falls, died at Alice Friday from injuries received when his HIGHE PRICES Angels-trumpets appropriately blossoming at Christmas-time excite the fervent admiration of Mrs. Mary Cook, Dallas, who discovered the heavenly blooms for the first time in the garden at the home of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Hunter, 222 W. Buchan- an. Unfolding at night, the clusters of snowy flowers which resemble lilies are at their best before the sun is well up or when it is obscured by clouds. Unlike lilies, they do not hold their cup-shaped centers toward the sky but droop downward like bells. (Staff TERUEL FALLS T6 INSURGENTS Madrid Denies City Is Retaken chologicnl grip of those in power, ington. A year ago my optimism for naturally resent any implication 1937 was tempered by the labor that loss of spiritual power ac- counts for empty pews. They fool themselves, exactly as the Jewish fooled themselves. The latter thought they could stamp out what they conceived to be insur- rection against their spiritual au- thority. They thought they could do it by the crass physical method of merely crucifying a man. But they could not. The spiritual truth He taught far transcended His phy- sical body. The body might be killed; the truth could not. His re- surrection exemplified the ascen- dancy of spirit over matter. As a man Ke died: as an imperishable npiritua! force He lived again. It was the formalism, already dead ii spirit, which perished. He, ct'uci f if lived on. I JESUS UNDERSTOOD all this. Two of His disciples came Him to talk over their prospects for suc- cess in life. They were ambitious. They nsked that they be permitted to sit, the one on the righi i.niid and the other on the left. They wanted political appointment 10 seats of spiritual power. That was the way positions of power were obtained 1937 was tempered by the labor issue. 1 said: "If this issue (labor) is not handled properly, business could receive a very rude setback." Now I am tempering my 1938 op- timism by saying that Cangress must- cooperate with business or iSce Babson Sees. Page 2, Col, 2) i nil about them. 'i-till were babes. itually they They did not un- Patiently the Master explained to TO that he who would be first be last; that he would must be the servant Turning On, Page 6, Col. 7) Brownsville Has Dallas Visitors BROWNSVILLE Visitors in Brownsville several days last week included Mr, and Mrs. H. E. Geablo of Dallas. Geable is superintendent of the Highland Park Schools and while in Brownsville visited with Superintendent of Schools in Brownsville, E. C. Dodd. 42, attorney and 32-year resident of this section, died Saturday morning at the McAllen hospital after a short illness. Funeral services will be conduct- ed from Trinity Episcopal Church here Sunday at a. m., with Rev. Robert A. Martin officiating, assist- ed by Rev. L. K. Brown of the Methodist Church and the Rev. J, B. Smith of the Presbyterian Church here. The body will be forwarded to Waco by the Martin-Nelson Mortu- ary for further services at the Kelly home Monday at 3 p. m., and burial at Oakwood Cemetery, Aus- tin. Dr, Walter Anthony of the Aus- tin Avenue Methodist Church will officiate at the Waco services. Surviving are the wife, Mrs. Gertrude Kelly; daughter. Cherrie Louise Kelly; mother, Mrs. J. C. Kelly: brother, J. Connally Kelly, all of Pharr: and sister, Mrs. J. P. Holt, of Nashville, Tennessee. Kelly was s son of the late John C. Kelly, early developer in the Pharr section. He was a graduate of Waco High School and the Uni- versity of Texas, a World War vet- eran and a member of the Pharr American Legion Post. Thompson Announces In Governor's Race AUSTIN The New Year started with a bang politically Sat- urday when Col. Ernest O. Thomp- son, member and former chairman, of the railroad commission, an- nounced his candidacy for the Tex- as governorship. The announcement, long expected, was made in Corpus Christi. Thompson, a commission member since 1932, said he would not resign his post in making the race He said he would issue his platform and name his manager about March 1, at which time he would start his campaign. South Pole Flight Planned By Red Pilot Who Headed North Pole Trip MOSCOW Vodopya- noff. who piloted the first plane of the Soviet expedition to the North Pole last may, Saturday proposed a similar expedition to the South Pole. The flier wrote in Provda. Com- munist party organ, of an Antarctic expedition eluded: as "a dream" but con- "In our country no dream is un- realizable." Mikhail Gromoff, leader of the second Russia'! flight to the United States across the north pole last July, writing in the newspaper "Ma- chine also mentioned the possibility of a Russian flight over the South Pole. Gromoff and his companions a distance record of 6.262 miles when they at San Jacinto, Calif., July Oil Wage Increase Delayed In Mexico MEXICO CITY A show- down in the bitter wage dispute be- tween the Mexican government and the oil industry was postponed Saturday when the la- bor board suspended its order in- creasing the wages of oil workers. The suspension was ordered pend- ing a ruling by the supreme court on an appeal taken by the 16 Amer- ican and British companies con- cerned from an arbitration board's award of Dec, 18. By The Associated Press Fronco-Spanish Fron- ier Insurgent Spai.. !ay celebrated recapture of 'j cruel, which Insurgent leaders hailed as 'one of the most decisive defeats" nflicted on the government in the 17-months-old civil war. j Government forces which had 1 held the strategically vital provin- I cial capital in lower Aragon were re- i ported retreating to the south in great confusion, The victorious In- surgents were said to be in complete control of Teruel. The struggles for Teruel was des- cribed as the greatest battle of the war with men engaged. An Insurgent communique said "the roads are black with fugitives and remains of the destroyed red army." Two foreign correspondents fol- lowing the Insurgent advance were killed and two others wounded when a government shell hit their automobile west of Teruel. The dead were Bradish GaiUard Johnson, Jr., Harvard-educated correspond- ent for the magazines "Spur" and shanks, of Keuters, the British news agency. Edward J. Neil of the Associated Press was wounded in the left thigh and taken to n hospital in Zaragoza, the Insurgent base 100 miles west of Teruel. Harry Philby of the Times of London suffered a head injury. The small Insurgent garrison which has held out inside Toruel during the ten days of government January 10 Designated A> Rose Day By Valley Women In New Campaign JVTcALLEN January 1 has been selected by the Rio Grande Valley Garden- Club Council as Rose Day, in memory of Julia Cameron Montgomery, who began the beautification projects ir. "._> Valley, Mrs. Walter K. .11, chairman, sair1 i-wy over the Valley, Garden Club workers will furnish merchants with quantities of roses, which will in turn be distributed to customers in accordance with the amount of purchases. Proceeds of the Rose Day sales will go to the treasury of the Council, to carry on work began by Mrs. Montgomery. Roses will be donated from pri- vate gardens and from florists over the Valley, for their particu- lar communities. One rose will be given for purchases amounting to one dollar or more. The flowers will be limited to three to a buyer, Mrs. Campbell said. Mrs. Campbell is assisted in planing the Rose Day program by Mrs. George McCullough, and Gar- den Clubs in every city of the Valley. FD WILL URGE TAX DECLINES Receipt Nearly Twice 1936 Period's WESLACO Valley cit- rus growers began the New Year Saturday win a head start on last season's income records and a fair chance to complete this season's deal with many dollars to the good. A year ago the f e d eral government had bought 300 carloads of Valley grapefruit lor relief distribution in an effort to bolster sagging prices. This New vcar-s Day fincjs yal- Icy growers jingling almost twice the amount of money in their jeans for about a fourth more grapefruit, and with prospects of getting good prices for the remainder of the crop. The Growers Industry Commit- tee, administering the citrus fruit marketing agreements, estimates that Valley growers have received approximately to date for their grapefruit alone, compared to not more than at the same date last season- Detailed The committee figures are based on 5.5-S4 carloads of fruit averaging 400 boxes of 77 pounds each to the car at an average price of a ton to the grower. To date last season there had been moved approximately 4.529 cars av- eraging 372 boxes of 77 pounds eaefe. at an average price of not -more than SI1 a ton to the grower. The average may be high, it was pointed out, because the govern- ment was paying S7.50 a ton for re- lief fruit and some shippers were charging the growers SI a ton for harvesting, leaving them only President Ihc su average, however, the it T growers received a total of about Over Message of about for their cars of fruit. Early orange prices have been WASHINGTON considerably better than last sea- Roosevelt worked today on an an- f" and 1he growers' income nual message to congress which seemed likely to boar down heav- ily upon the notes of tax relief, budget balancing and stronger anti- trust laws. The chief executive discussed the general legislative situation at a luncheon with Speaker Bankhead at which arrangements were com- pleted for Mr. Roosevelt to deliver from this source also is much great- er than a year ago. Many individuals and organiza- tions report increased revenue from citrus fruits in line wiln the com- mittee statement. Income Increasing Harold F. Looney of the Bayview Citrus Association said that this or- ganization had received S2.000 more for fewer boxes of grapefruit than last season. Others reported occupation was rescued by an Insurgent column Friday afternoon. Government Denies Teruel Has Fallen MADRID Spanish gov- ernment Saturday would not ad- mit that Teruel, strategic lower Ar- agon city, had been recaptured by the Insurgents. Communiques declared govern- ment forces still held the city al- though suffering terrific punish- ment from the Insurgents' quick- firing artillery batteries. Britain To Rearm In Mediterranean LONDON Britain moved Sunday to bolster the defenses of her vital Mediterranean route to India and the Orient by dispatching a large force of anti-aircraft troops with equipment to Alexandria, Egypt- New Year Tots Born CAN BENITO To Mr. and MCE. Ceasario Castillo, of .San Benito, went the honor of the first 1938 baby, a son born at a.mi of the new year'i first day. San Benito also produced an- other baby born Saturday at p.m.. a nine and one-half pound son to Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Bowden, at their San Benito home. At a.m. Saturday, to Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Bowler, near Brownsville, a nine-pound boy was bbrnt at Mercy Hospit- al. PRIZE HORSES TAKEAWARDS Large Crowd Views Weslaco Show the message personally to congress I similar increases in citrus income Monday. Although Bankhead said he talk- ed of numerous subjects with the president "up and down the line." the Alabaman gave no hint of what new legislative proposals, if any, the message would contain. However, blistering attacks on big business and monopolistic prac tices earlier this week by two ad- ministration stalwarts. Secretary Iskes and Robert H. Jackson, assis- tant attorney-general. inspired widespread belief that the president Many factors are said to have. contributed to the better prices in s'pite of the fact that a thousand more cars of grapefruit were moved to market in the same period of time. The strong competition be- tween shippers attempting to keep enlarged plants going at an econom- ical volume has had its effect, it wns pointed out.. Concentration of tonnage into fewer hands such, as the Rio Grande Valley Citrus Exchange with about per cent of, the Valley's grape- WESLACO Reflecting steady improvement in the type of horses j now being shown in trie Valley, along with increasing public interest? in fine mounts, the delayed Weslaco i Horse Show took place Saturday at j the high school athletic field with more than a dozen top-ranking- horses on display. Ribbons, cups and cash were handed out in a total of 10 classes. would have considerable to say fruit mid oranges under control, to congress aJong this line. Senator undoubtedly was a factor. Regulations of the control com- mittees under the citrus fruit mar- keting agreements are believed to have kept, shipments from skyrock- eting still further and to have main- tained a desirnble price for smaller sizes which formerly were discount- ed. The smaller sizes loft on trees through regulation are expected to bring the growers added income from increased tonnage either through fresh fruit or canning chan- nels. Outlook Borah iR-Idaho) arch foe of mono- poly, said "action" was needed to meet the problem, adding "it is lime to legislate.-" Carmichael Here Still On Mystery BROWNSVILLE Coi. H. H. Carmiohael, Director of the Texas awards j Department of Public Safely, left I the Valley Saturday night after a I quiet visit here over New Year's I Day. "The Valley is the most beautiful spot in the world. I come down here The list of winners included the following, by classes: Novice 3-gaited stake; 1 Nancy M, Carroll, owned by Mr. and Mrs T. several times a year, lo gel away lo romaindor of the grapefruit deal T. Sanders. Jr., ridden by Doe Jrom. offlce and resl- J Thompson; 2. Texian, owned by Dee I found the Valley one of the most The growers obtained better pric- es in spite of the strongest kind of competition from deciduous fruits which were abundant and therefore ovlrcmely cheap. Falling orange prices due to heavy supplies offer the greatest threat Davenport, Miss Joanna Pope up; 3. Anacacho Love, owned by Joanna Pope, who also rode; 4. Babe, own- ed by J. H. McGee, Miss Catherine Sanders up, Competition Is Keen Novice 5-gaited stake: 1. Anacacho Meteor, owned by Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Parks, George Winfree up: 2. Gray Boy, owned and ridden by G. L. Simmonds; 3. Red McDonald, owned by T. R. Traylor, H. T. Grin- er up; 4. Anacacho Night, owned by W. S. Parks, Winfree up. Children's equestrian class: 1. Minnie Lee, owned by J. H. McGee. Miss Sanders up; 2. Rainbow, owned and ridden by Miss Elaine Utzman; 3. Don Corazon. owned and ridden by Bobby Clyde Cheek; 4. Calamity, owned and ridden by Bernice Ba- den: 5. Evening Song, owned and ridden by Behe Skaggs. Ladies' 3-gaited stake: l. Evening Song, owned and ridden by Miss Skaggs; 2. Man of the Hour, owned by Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Skaggs, Mrs. delightful places in the state lo spend a few days." He said his visit was not in any way connecled with the Blanton case. "We are still working hard on the case but there is nothing new." but the outlook on the whole is con- sidered bright with canning plants beginning operations and compet- ing for the fruit that if left. Compe- tition also will remain keen among fresh fruit shippers with largo plants lo keep going on a short crop. A I short crop in Florida also will help I materially. I (See Weslaco Horse, Page 6, Col, 1) Playland Fantasy In Flowers Seen By Million At Tournament Of Roses PASADENA, Calif. As a I lion. This float, entered by the cily million persons looked on Saturday, odd people and strange things out uf story books passed before them pictured in flowers. It was" a four-mile long parade t.f "playland the 49th An- nual Tournament of Roses. A ferocious sweet pea dragon rode on a float with floral merry- round animals which included a smart-looking donkey, a long-neck- ed giraffe, a yellow and white horse, a feathery ostrich and a huge-yellow more than of Burbank, won the sweepstakes prize. Australia's "lyre worked out in 50.000 blooms and with a trail of feathery white narcissus, was victor among the countries and states. Glcndale's float, a floral picture of the change of "the with four pretty girls representing the spirits of spring, summer fall and winter, was first among cities ot   

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