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Valley Star Monitor Herald Newspaper Archive: December 26, 1937 - Page 1

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Publication: Valley Star Monitor Herald

Location: Brownsville, Texas

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   Valley Star-Monitor-Herald (Newspaper) - December 26, 1937, Brownsville, Texas                               The Weather Fair Today For the Bio Grande Valley: Fair Saturday night and Sunday. Not much change in temperature. Fall Wealner Detain Section t Vol. 20 A VALJ.ET-OWNK0 INSTITUTION VALLEY SUNDAY -MONITOR HART.TNGEN. McALLEN. BROWNSVILt E, TEXAS. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1937 Final Edition 10 Cents All the news of the World and the Valley. Best Feat- ures and World's Best Comics. FULL LSASBD ASSOCIATED PRESS FORTY-EIGHT PAGES U. S. ACCEPTS JAPANESE APOLOGIES THE LIGHT "6M LI6HTAND PEOPLE WILL FIND THEIR OWN WAY" THIS IS the Sunday nearest Christmas Day. Almost the entire, civilized world has laid aside its daily rou- tine and is making festival of the anniversary of the birth of a babe. As the rec- ord says of the song of the host of angels on that natal day, our softened hearts have been chanting, by word or act, "Peace on earth, good will toward men." This child never went to school. He probably learned to read through the instruction of his re- ligious teachers. Hit education, as we under stand __ that word, was very meagre. He never wrote a book or pamphlet. _ No word of what He said was ever written down un- til after He w-aj dead. He lived and died in a re- mote country, in- habited by simple folk. He was looked upon as a dangerous radical, by those in au- _ thority. They C. llttled Him with eve.ry power at their command. Finally they put an end to Him at 33 years of age. after three years in the public eye. He died ignomi- nously. No friend survived Him except His mother, a little group of women and a few fishermen who had followed Him about and lis- tened as He talked. The cold facts of His life, as they put Him away Jn his tomb, marked Him an a complete failure. As we take a look a. the -life, the labors and the death of this man, let us lor the moment ignore the claim of divinity which His friends made lor Him. Let us look at Him as a man man who began a career at 30 and died at 33. During those three years He never had a home. He moved about, chiefly on foot, talking to those with whom He came in contact. The stories told about Him said He healed the sick and raised the dead. If He did, they sickened again later on and died without leaving a rec- ord. It must be that what He said, later written down from memory by other men. is the thing upon which His reputation rests. DHOBABLY every man who aided in getting rid of Him, died in the belief that their conspiracy was a complete success. A few griev- ing friends clung to His memory, but they appeared to be without much weight. If one of them, from time to time, became troublesome, they put him to death also. It was all very simple and very final. If the people of His country thought of Him at nil, they considered Him a complete failure: a fool who paid with his lite for his folly. Yet this clay, 2.000 years later, in every village, hamlet and city of a hundred nations, people of edu- cation, refinement and character, gather in His name to do homage to Him as followers of His. That fact is the most remarkable fact of all history. The world has had its great char- acters. History parades its Alexan- ders, its Caosars and its Napoleons. They lived, made a deep impression upon their times, nm died. They are of interest now only to students of history. They have no active in- fluence upon the peoples of the world in the year 1937. Yet they were great men of their greatest the world has ever known. except one. They moved with devastating armies. They uprooted nations. They dammed the current of history and diverted the stream. Their momentary power was im- mense. This man never had any army. He never wished for one. He re- buked the only man who ever struck a physical blow in His be- half, and healed the stricken man, He over-threw no empire. He es- tablished no government. He mere- ly talked i a quiet tone as He walked along the sands of the sea- shore or sat upon a on the hill-side. THE CLASHING of the armies of the grea' military conquerors Sf li stilled. The empires which they built have decayeM and fallen. Bat the quiet voice of this man' still speaks down the centuries and mil- lions upon millions of educated and conscientious people hear and are Influenced by it In their daily be- havior. This week we will begin a new year. That new year is marked by a calendar which divides time at point of the birth of this man. To place a man in history we say Turning on. Page 2. Col. 5) r .Bonws Checks Indicate Valley Boom SURVEY SHOWS INDUSTRY ON UPWARD TREND Thousands Receive Extra Pay good business conditions which prevailed through- out the Rio Grande Valley during 1937, and made Harlingen and sur- rounding sections leaders in Texas retail trade, was reflected in Christ- mas bonuses to employes over this area a survey showed Saturday. Surveys, made in Brownsville, Harlingen and McAllen. while far from complete, showed 'that virtu- ally every type of retail and whole- sale business, as well as the leading industries, had made such progress during the year that gifts and bo- nuses larger than usual had been distributed. No actual estimate could be made in Harlmgen of those firms parti- cipating in Christmas gifts to em- ployes, nor of the amount involved. Conservative estimates, unofficial. I indicatel several thousand employes received thousands of dollars In I gifts and extra salaries. The Central Power and, Light j Company over the Valley followed its annual custom of issuing in- surance policies to employes with the company, based on salary, time with the company, snd a privilege feature of securing additional in- surance at half rate. Gives Cash Bonuses Texas Consolidated Theatres in Harlingen, Brownsville, San Benito. Mercedes and Wesla- eo also distributed cash bonuses. Thb J. C. Penney Store through- out this section, as well as the Piggly Wiggly Store and others, gave extra salaries to regular em- ployes. Among other Harlingen firms was the Snider Packing Company which issued gifts to 27 of its per- sonnel; the Grey Service Station and the Pollack Service Station; the Madison Hotel: the Rio Grande Pharmacy. Yoder Motor Company. The Ha--lingen post office staff was likewise treated, though not by the government. Extra Weeks Pay The C. R. Anthony Store here distributed extra week's salaries to 18 regular employes; and the Junkin Furniture gave each of 10 employes a week's wages, which totaled It was assumed that such largess was general among merchants of the Valley. A partial survey in Brownsville Flowers, UJot Snow, For Christmas (See Bonus Shows, Page 2, Col. 6) VALLEYDEATH TOLLMOUNTS 1 Killed, 11 Hurt In Road Crashes HARL1NGEN Death whittled another notch on a rapidly mount- ing list of Rio Grande Valley traf- fic victims Saturday, and brushed at least eleven others, as highways were dangerously filled with holi- day motorists. Scores of minor collisions occur- red. John Wenetachleger, 49-year-old Hidalgo county WPA laborer, was fatally injured on Highway 4 be- tween Alamo and San Juan Friday at p. m. Mr. and Mrs. Olsen, of Donna, told Justice of the Jeace Savage at Pharr that their auto had struck a man Friday night. They were unable to see him until too close to swerve. They stopped and rendered aid. Wenetachlcger's body was being held at the Martin-Nelson Mortu- Down in the Rio Grande Valley where the beauty and .the bloom bask in brilliant sunshine on Christmas day. Dorothy Jack Bates is, shown--in abovei photc> wittv a typical poinsettia blossom from the many thousands now m full bloom, bringing the true Christmas color and atmosphere to make this a typical bright and sunny Valley Christmas. _________ (btatt fhotoj. WORLD VIEWS HECTIC YULE Bloodshed In Holy Land Reported By The Associated Press White-robed choir boys, lifting their voices in the vibrant chords of "Hark! The Herald Angels Sins will carry on the festivity of Christmas in second-day religious ceremonies Sunday in churches throughout the nation. The devout continue celebrating the birth of the Christ child in a manger in Bethlehem 1937 years ago. There in Bethlehem itself, Brit- ish troops stood guard to prevent new violence that last cost 43 lives. The irony of bloodshed in the Duke Of Windsor Buys 'Out Florist For Wife France W) The Duke of Windsor practically bought out a floral shop Saturday to celebrate his first Christmas with his bride, the former Wallis Warfield. Rising late after a Christmas eve dinner with a few friends, the Duke went to his private floral shop and purchased nearly worth of orchids, violets and out-of-season lilacs. With a big smile, he ordered the lot delivered at once to the Duch- ess at the Villa of Mr. and Mrs. Herman L. Rogers where the Wind- sors are staying. The couple spent a quiet morning exchanging personal gifts. (See Yule Crashes, Page 2, Col. 31 stressed in a sermon at'Washington, D C.. with President Roosevelt a listener. The Rev. Peter Marshall. 35, preaching his first sermon to the president, chose lor his theme the angel's song of "Peace on Earth, Goodwill Toward Men" to which Mr. Roosevelt referred in his Christ- mas Eve broadcast to the nation. Terming the song. "The Lost Re- iht Marshall declared: las Day in" See World Views, Page 2, Col. 8) Violence Mars Christmas Services In Jerusalem; Arabs, British Fight JERUSALEM VP> Christian faithful knelt at the birthplace of the Christ Child Saturday in prayer for peace in the Holy Land, but even as they prayed British troops moved to quell new violence. Forty-three Arabs were killed and more than 20 wounded in battle the past two days in the Tiberias region. Three among the British troops were reported wounded. Terrorists, firing from the ground, disabled a Royal Air Force plane and forced it to land. Fearful that hostilities might break out elsewhere. British troops guarded Christians who trekked to Bethlehem for ponti- ficial mass in the Church of the Nuns watched over the manger- cradle of the Christ Child as the procession of worshippers passed through the famed grotto of the church, bending low to enter the church door which is only four feet high. 7 CITY HEADS ARE INDICTED Buffalo Swindling .Is Charged BUFFALO, N. Y. (fP) Adminis- trators of Now York's second larg- est city Saturday awaited Governor Lehman's decision on a plan to widen a municipal affairs inquiry which already has placed nearly half the city council under arrest After an eight week investigation, a grand 'jury asked appointment of a special prosecutor and an extra- ordinary grand jury to carry on the inquiry which they described as a "gigantic task." The jury's recom- mendation is being considered by the governor. x miics ii-uui neic. Before adjourning the grand jury The dead: Joan, 4, and Jeanine showed its grim holiday mood by LaPointe, 7, sisters, of Chelsea. Mrs. presenting 16 indictments resulting Marie Marois, 59, Chelsea, their in the arrest of seven of the city s grandmother. Lena Fradas, 38, Lewiston, a cousin. Fred Coulombe, 45, Lewiston. Polar Campers Send New Year Greetings MOSCOW The four Rus- sian polar campers, on a drifting ice radioed New Year greet- ings to the homeland Saturday. A strong snow storm and a north wind whipped across their floating home, and the thermometer was at 7.6 degrees above zero. ___ _ YULE FLAMES FATALTO FIVE Horror Ends Gaiety In Maine Village AUBURN, Me. (IP) Five persons perished Saturday as flames swept a flimsy .lake shore cottage, swiftly transforming a scene of Christmas gaiety into one of horror for a family gathering of twenty-five per- sons. Two of the victims were children, trapped with others in upstairs bed- rooms, as flames spread by an ex- ploding oil heater suddenly envel- oped the wooden cottage of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ginchereau of Auburn, on the bank of Lard Pond, Turner, six miles from here. NINEMIUIONS SPENT IN 1937 FOR BUILDING Valley Boom Seen In 3 Counties BROWNSVILLE, The Lower Rio Grande Valley spent a total of on new construc- tion and development work during the year just closing, a survey of the entire section just completed here shows. This is by far the greatest total since the boom days in the Valley. Furthermore, the expenditure shows a wider t ige of development, in- cluding a vast amount of indus- trial work in packing and process- ing plants, port warehouses and docks, and the like, Six hundred new homes were built in the Valley during the year', the survey reveals. It also shows that Dhere was a decided slump in building in the Valley area during the past five weeks, although a number of new projects are on the list for the new year. Brownsville In Lead In building by cities Brownsville and Harlingen led the Valley with over each. McAllen and Weslaco were close on the heels of the others. The survey shows that a total of was spent oh processing plants in the Valley, this expendi- ture being made over practically the entire section. The individual projects are: Plant for Ric Goods Inc. at Mer- cedes, costing an addition to Terrell Garth plant' in Mission, cannery for R. W. Apte of Miami, in Edinburg, remodeling plant in Santa Rosa for Bruce's Juices Inc. of Florida, remodeling job on cannery at Mission for R. C. Haus- singer of Sugarland. Cannery for Alamo Products Co. in Alamo .costing plant at Weslaco for L. Maxcy Tex- as Corporation, addition in Edinburg to Rio Grande Valley Canning Co. plant, plant in Weslaco for Christenson Products Co.. addition to St. Clair Food plant at McAllen, meat packing plant at Harlingen for Southwestern Packing Co. Canneries Built Five thousand dollar cannery addition for Riona Products Co. at McAllen, caniicry addition for Valley Fruit Co., at Pharr. remodeling job on Citrus Fruit Products Inc. plant at Donna, 000 juice plant at Mission for Rio i Grande Valley Citrus Association, j dehydration plant at Wes- j laco for Rio Grande Valley j Association. juice plant ad- dition in Weslaco for Rio Grande Valley Citrus Association. remodeling job for Bardo Canning Co. plant at Weslaco, pack- ing plant and processing plant in Lindsay Gardens for R. W. Lind- say, cannery addition for Craddock Canning Co. at San Be- nito, cannery addition for Schmidt Canning Co. at San Be- nito, packing, juice and dehydrating plant at Engelman Gardens for Engelman Gardens As- sociation. Ten thousand dollar cannery at Donna for George R. Kelley and J. C. Dunn, addition to Donna Packing Co. plant in Edinburg, addition to Smith Cannery at Mission, cannery in Rio Hondo for Mosely-Mariiham-Rett- inger Co., plant at La Pajo- ma for McClure Canning Co., 000 plant in Brownsville for Texas Canning Co.. addition to Olmito Canning Co. plant at Olmi- to, addition to juice plant of Edinburg Citrus Association at Edinburg. cannery in Har- or Harlingen Canning Co., DIES SATURDAY TSINGTAONOW IS BLOCKADED Chinese Sink Ships; Citizens Flee Newton D. Baker, secre- tary of war during World conflict, died in Cleveland Saturday following a heart attack. He had been con- fined to his bed since Dec. 3. HEART FAILS NEWTON BAKER ON CHRISTMAS War Secretary" Dies In Cleveland (See McAllen And. Page 8, Col. 1) CLEVELAND, Newton D. Baker, who as secretary of war mobilized the greatest army in the history of his country, died Sat- urday after a heart attack. The short, eloquent statesman who served in the world war cab- inet of President Wilson had been confined to his bed since shortly after his 66th birthday December 3. He was first stricken several months ago in Syracuse. N. Y. He recovered from thit attack and resumed some of his law prac- tice here. As counsel for a number of utilities he recently appeared in court at Chattanooga, Tenn., in a suit involving the utilities and the Tennessee Valley Authority. In the later years of his life he had withdrawn gradually from the multiplicity of interests, which he cultivated after leaving public ser- vice, living quietly at his home here and visiting his law office frequently. Last year he resigned as chair- man of the Cuyahoga county (Cleveland) Democratic Central Committee. A position he had held for 26 years. He said then "it's up to us ol-er men to give the young fellows their Members Of the family had gath- ered at the Baker home for a quiet Christmas. The former war secre- tary's son, Mrs. Baker. Mrs. Mc- Gesn. a physician and a nurse were with him when he died. Christmas Baby Is Born In McAllen McALLEN The Valley's Christ- mas Lee Dean, eight pounds three ounces was born here at McAllen Municipal Hospi- tal Saturday ot 3 a. m. Mrs. Dillard Dean and daughter reported "doing nicely." Syl- via Lee is her first. "This is the first human pack- age I've ever taken off the Christ- mas tree, figuratively speaking. Of course I'm puffed said Dillard Dean. WASHINGTON (Jf) The Unit- ed States accepted Saturday Jap- anese guarantees "against infringe- ment of, or unwarranted interfer- ence with, the rights and interests ot the United States" in China. The Panay incident, which threatened to create serious diplo- matic trouble, if not worse, between the two countries, was considered closed as to its general lines. Some technical points, chiefly the amount of the indemnification, remain to be worked out. Secretary Hull, in E. formal reply to the Japanese note of Friday, said: "The government of the United States regards the Japanese gov- ernment's account, as set forth in the Japanese government's of December 24. of action taken by it, as responsive to the request made by the government of the United States in this government's note of December 14." Secretary Hull conferred with President Roosevelt, Under-Secre- tary Sumner Welles and Assistant Secretary Hugh Wilson before in- diting his reply. The United States continues to rely, however, on the facts con- tained in'the findings of the 'ntivy court, of inquiry. This may be tak- en to mean that this government does not admit the Version of as contained in the Jap- anese note, but does not intend to pursue the argument further. BLOCKADE THROWN AROUND TSINGTAO BY JAPANESE SHANGHAI (Sunday) The Japanese navy announced today that a blockade had been thrown around the industrial city of Tsifig- tao, where three United States war- craft were standing by to evacuate 300 Americans. Japanese land forces pushing for- ward into North China previously had cut off communications be- tween Tsinanfu, Shantung province capital, and Tsingtao, which is on (See U, S. Accepts, Page 11, Col. 1) I Overeating Fatal To Two Men In Matamoros Area MATAMOROS, bral congestions following hear-. ty Christmas midnight repasts put two residents of this section in graves Saturday. Special In- vestigator Ramon B. Arguelles said. Laureano A. Garmendi. 42, en- gineer, died after a festive meal at the home of his cousin. Am- brosio Fernandez; and Nicolas Espinosa. 34, farmer, died at the El Capote Ranch, 17 miles west of Matamoros. early Christmas. morning after a holiday meal. Both men were buried Christ- mas afternoon. Progress TTHIS edition of The Sunday Star- Monitor Herald irt-iefly reviews the Rio Grande Valley's construction and in- dustrial bonm. durinr 1937, It greatest since the days of 1929. In photograph and story, major dfvolopnu-nts are The Valley is trowing rapidly. It Is well (o record its at we move ahead. 15 couneilmen, a former state sena- tor, a councilman-elect, a city pay- master and six former city employes on. felony counts. The indictments included charges of perjury, forg- ery or obtaining city funds through fraudulent claims. Xmas Mail Volume Breaks AU Records WASHINGTON Postmaster General Farley estimated Saturday that 'Christmas mail this year set a new record. Air-Conditioning Had To Be Used In Valley Theatres Christmas Day IJARLINGEN Where in all the United States does the populace stroll about in shirtsleeves outdoors, turn off all heaters day and evening, turn on the air-conditioning-refrigeration sys- tem in its theatres? Just one guessed it the first the Lower Rio Grande Valley. Last night in New York City, Chicago, even in many southern cities, theatre-goers left home clad in warm furs, the heaviest of winter gar- heating systems were going full blast to keep them comfortably Last nfght in Harlingen, Jock King, i7-.3nager of the Arcadia theatre, ordered the Arcadia's ncv.- combinod refrigeration and air-conditioning plant into operation, because a capacity audience of Valley" theatre-goers was suffering from the heat. with the heating plant entirely shut down. Clad mostly in what would be only summertime in nearly every other section of the country, the audience was uncomfortably warm, until the cooling plant was placed in operation. Valleyites largely spent Christmas day out- if indoors with springlike breezes blowing freely through opened windows. Maximum temperature reached in Harlmgen Saturday was 81 while the minimum, only a few degrees lower, was 61.   

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