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   Brownsville Herald, The (Newspaper) - January 1, 1953, Brownsville, Texas                               THE WEATHER today, cooler to- night and tomorrow with wind. ting to north- tonight. 66 PAGES Swing The Rio Grande Why For More Thm 60 Year. BROWNSVILLE, There it not heart hut iti of long ing, yearning for tomething bet. ter, nobler, holier than it knowt now. Ward Beecker T PRICED Meeting Of GOP Brass Planned One Killed On Valley Highways The Valley counted its first Qn Korean Front n enemy Chinese and North Korean troops south of llen on Depot Rd. at (he intersection of Farm-to- Market Rd. ioie and resulted in the death of Ruben Roberto nas. 30, of McAllen. orcan positions, rocked minder to the Communists that the United Nations was slaying in Two Chinese platoons converged pick-up driven by Ramon Pena, 22, of Mission, collided at the in'ter- Jiectlon. Salinas' vehicle crashed! after a Into a telephone pole, and he was; skirmish. .s H- i .Sniper Ridge on the west front we''e driven north- two -and-a-half- hour killed instantly. Pena and two passengers In pick-up, Ponciano Pena and Bal-l ln cto demar Santana of Mission, an Twenty Communist soldiers were se fighting with hand and not injured. Salinas' body was taken to Vir- Chinese platoons were gil Wilson Funeral Home ;n back in the Kelly Hill iseclor northwest of Yonchon. wife; lwo'AIIieci tack from one sons. Ruben Jr. and Ramiro; one'atlvance but reocciipied it Allen. include hi Seaman Kills Communist Aboard Ship TAIPEH, Formosa, Jan. An alert seaman shot and killed a Chinese Communist trying to cap. ture a Nationalist merchant ship and driver it to Red-held Shang- md rifles in no-man's hal several days ago. it was learn- ed Thursday. The incident was the second such' story to come.to light in the last 48 hours. Tuesday a Chinese pas- senger aboard Philippines air- line DC-3 killed the pilot and purs- on the western front. iiuuci! ji. aim riamiro' one pw.mivji um itunjupieci u ivjueu ine pitot and pi daughter, .Maria Lourdes; artillery pounded ier ami a futile attempt brothers and three sisters and his tne smal1 Red attacking force, parents. Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Sa-i Sncm' (c" hvo hours before mid- Itnas Sr. of Mexico. 'night on the central front Wednes- Salinas was employed by the day' to 12 inches in the He had frozen of no-man's-land. about a Temperatures plummeled from 35 degrees lo three above zero. There was no sign of the "gen- a n d eral offensive" broadcast to ROK troops on the front lines several days ago over loudspeakers. There still was no sign of any major enemy troop buildup. Gen. James A. Van Fleet, who paid a New Year's visit to the press billets in Seoul, reported that Allied casualties were the lightest for the month of December. The Fifth Air Force announced that Allied Sabrejets destroyed MIG-15 jets at better than a H to 1 ratio during the month. to Valley Ready-Mix Co. lived In Mercedes until year ago. Brownavllle Quiet In Brownsville, police Q u sheriff's officers had a quiet night New Year's Eve, except for one theft. A cigaret vending machine was hauled off from the Michael Joseph Drive-In last night. County Highway Patrolman M. H. Mitchell found the machine early this morn- ing on the Old Alice Rd. In Harlingen. a Baylor Univer- sity student and his "fiance were injured Wednesday when their car crashed into a telephone pole on E. Harrison St. Injured were Bob Moore Knight, 21, of Harlingen. ind Miss Frances Land, 18 of Gladewater. Harlingen police said the couple was returning from Rio Hondo when the accident occurred. They were taken to th. Valley Baptist Hoapltal. Their injures not considered serious. At Mission, a SO-year-old man required medical attention early thte morning when a pistol shot went through his left hand and middle finger. Lalo Villarreal, vrhn nj Doherty A Union Bus Employes Set Strike MeALLEN Drivers and main- tenance men of the Union Bus Lines were scheduled to go out on strike at midnight tonight, accord- rt iLtriijijL force the plane into Hed China Chinese officials have not offi- cially confirmed the details of the piracy the hieh seas. CamC The Chinese passenger, accord- Deceived here, broke 1 Into the radio room of the mer- chant ship Teinhang, owned bv Taiwan Shipping Corp., and forced the operator to standby while he smashed the equipment. The passenger Ihen dashed to the ship s bridge and, poking a gun in the captain's ribs, ordered him to change course for Shanghai. The ship, which had sailed from Hone Kong, was enroute to Keelung. An alrrt seaman, working on the bridge roof, saw the gun being poked at his captain and leaped on the gunman's back. Then, accord- ing to authorities, he seized the gun and kilted Ihe would-be pirate The ship continued safely to Kee- fung. The news blackout clamped on the incident, it was reported may have been because the piracv at tempt followed closely the case of the freighter Nidar, whose crew mutinied and sailed the Red China bound ship to Formosa recently a pistol to welcome the new year. Police, called at a.m., said the shooting was an accident. The man was not badly hurt, they said. melancholy wail of ambu- lance sirens helped ring In the New Year today As the holiday traffic death toll began its slow climb toward an expected total of UO. But many merrymakers seemed to be mixing a dash of caution with their New Year's cheer, and the ident of the company. The operators are asking wage increases, and negotiations be- tween the men and the company broke down today with no new meetings scheduled, according to Hylton. He declined to say what the employees union was asking. Union Bus Lines operates about miles a month over a south Texas route bounded by Browns- Strategy Sessions Scheduled By Ike nt GOP strategy for program through Congress At the same time, they would give Taft and other COP congressional lead- ers a hand in shaping GOP policy before It inld before Congress for approval. Meanwhile, it was disclosed that the incoming president expects to address Congress shortly afler Bus Strike Ties Up Gotham By filLMOHK NEW YORK, Ja sink inauguration to give legislators his own ideas on cutting federal spend- ing. Eisen- loduv tuuuv and threatened the nation's largest city with the worst transportation marl in history. The bus lines serve 3.5 million riders daily. Michael J. Quill, president of Ihe Transport Workers Union (CIO) called the strike at one minute aft- er midnight. Fie warned that he [would shut down the city's subways 'and elevated lines "if any attempt is made to punish a single man for refusing overtime" called to help ease the bus crisiB. As the result city officials suspended plans to run extra subwav and elevated l trains. ,1 Belong To Sum Union Solon Says HST Stalls Red Action WASHINGTON. Jan. 1 -UP- m_ Slx early volume of accident reports was fairly light. A United Press tabulation at! a.m. cst showed that at least 33 persons were killed in holiday HI. accidents of all types. Traffic mis- haps killed 29 persons, a plane' crash killed one, one person died )n a fire and miscellaneous acci- dents took two lives. Ohio Xntion Ohio marked nn tho High Seas Hampering Rescue Work NORFOLK. Va.. Jan. 1 !UDVers'ves United Na- seas prevented a T7.S. Coast I Sen. Herbert R. O'Conor today i L Thc last blls for La- m-toay and the Iast ve'Shl "S to leave nt P- Hylton said. men ara tO I mainten- in the SEVEN KILLED RABAT, French Morocco. killed Jan. t n. w toaav charged President Truman and Secretary of State Dean Acheson with delaying action against subx-ersives in recent UN session. The Maryland Democrat said their decision "may have averted temporarily a serious situation within the UN itself." but ignored (he shatlering of the confidence of the people of the United States In the United Nations." Meanwhile House investigators disclosed (hat former Secretary of Second Operation On Brodie Twin Must Be Postponed f' Doctors 5aia that cv ranno the task of covering Rodney Dee Brodie's brain with a skin flap. a satjsf Subway and elevated line work- ers belong to the same union. Complicating the New York transportation crisis was a strike called on the waterfront by three locals of the International Long- shoremen's Association (AF1) for a.m. Friday. This strike threatened a port- wide tie-up not only here but In Boston, Philadelphia and Balti- more. Union President Joseph P Ryan ordered APL w o r k e r a hi those ports to refuse to handle car- go on any ship diverted from New fork.. Tfie flock-wallopers strike was called after union and management had failed to reach agreement on a new contract. The last contract ended Sept. 30. Threw Locals Involved Although only three locals were involved, union spokesmen said Ryan had ordered all-out support of the strike as a form of protest against the New York State Crime Commission. The commission has uncovered a sordid story of vicious waterfront corruption in which un- ion official allegedly took part. Of most concern to the average New Yorker, however, was Ihe bus strike. Quill ordered the strike aft (See STRIKE, Page 8.) nocmey uee Brodie's brain with a skin flan! over his SUPP'y In already placedl Pistol SllOOler.1 Iline aboard a crippled early today off Cape N. C.. legendary "grav Atlantic. dintH e v-w and hail storm that TRAFFIC. Page g.) eary o State James F. Byrnes will" be normally sunny Morocco __ Uon Pedro Says p Pa" Hiss dcdsion that lhe Slales not leaders, said the President-elect Indicated he will meet weekly with Republican Scnale and House lead- ers, No details for handling llalion belween Ihe executive and legis- lative branches have been worked out yet. Hut it appeared likely that such meeting would take place on Monday mornings, in much same paltei-n set by President! Roosevelt and Truman. From other sources It was leam- !d that Eisenhower emphasized .n talking to the Senate leaderi that he is Intent on cutting the budget which President Truman will submit to Congress next week. The Truman budget is expected to call for federal spending of about J79 billion during the U months starling July 1. Eisenhower, It was said, tingled out militai-y spending-expected to account for about billion of Truman budget-as the field offer- ing the greatest opportunity for spending cuts. The President-elect, armed irith preliminary data gathered In Washington by Joseph M. Dodge, his advance fiscafl agent, was saia to have told the Senate leaders that efficiencies in purchasing of miUtfry tbouM fea- sible sizable cuts in the military budget. He 'also named the con- struction of overseas bases a> an- other field ripe for economies, and was said to have maintained that eliminating the "gadget" approach to armaments would make possible both reduced expenses and faster deliveries. Fined In Weslaco The Coast Guard here reported winds of 50 to 55 miles per hour whipped the stricken Dutch freighter Hydra, believed to have 35 or 40 crewmen aboard. Thc ship was not considered in immediate "anger, however. The USS Conifer reached the ydra in a rising storm, the Coast on the Iov-iGlmrd reported, but gales prevent- iiting a rescue. led freighter! Rodney Dee was separated from his weaker Siamese twin Roger JlllC" III FP'  ltllnll-h Ulfl w'11ls already been ney General James r McOranciy cent of all munirip.il water 'nmlcd r-r.viriv] for the structure. ,See 0-CON-OR. 8 o.ts.de Ihe present Urn- MM (ho amoi.rt collected is 69 rer cent of Bulletins VALPARAISO. Chile. .Inn. 1 Police reported tixlny thnt 34 persons were killed anil an csllmufcd Injured In n lire nnd i-xplosioii In n wnler- Ironl powder m.iRjizinp at .1 a.m. laxts due for 1952. At the sanse time in 1951, 70 per cent of all taxes due had been collected. MAHIOX. Tex.. Jan. 1 five pfnmni killed to- day when the two cars In which Iney ivcrc ridfnc collided hrad- nn Ihree miles of Marion on State Highway Kx-C.onricl Killed In Esntite -MOBKIILY. Mo., Jan 1 ltooiic wound received when he atlempted JiUK'il Tllcfl lo break nw.iy from police. HARLINGKX Daniel Inhce ChK-f Omar said-is in the city jail charged lionimous was by Officer Joe thefl reel Wednesday night after he, Boone. no relation to the famous jumped from a pntrol car and woodsman, was charged wilh steal- .artcd running. ,nfr a wool jacket. He Vme.t Romnious had heon up SSfi costs m Justice ,-r Iho fiimving a disturbance. 
                            

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