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Brownsville Herald Newspaper Archive: September 26, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Brownsville Herald

Location: Brownsville, Texas

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   Brownsville Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 26, 1945, Brownsville, Texas                               Weather Scattered Thursday. on Page 2 B4th Year No. 73 IroitmHwlte Serving The Rio Grande Valley For Over SO Yeart Final Edition Wednesday. Sept. 26, 1945 Brownmrllle, Price 5 Cento MACARTHUR WILL MEET WITH HIROHITO yasMaboTln Curiosity..... Problemsl Vets Take Part in Picket Anny, Navy Industry, Labor Continue Meeting To Halt Strikes 30 Per Cent Increase In Wages Sought By, Oil Workers In 15 Companies CHICAGO Fed- eral and repre- sentatives of the oil industry and labor today resumed their conference aimed to brinfr an amicable settle- ment of strikes in seven states which have idled dome workers and curtailed production of much of the nation's fraso- supplies. Day and nlpht sessions were held yesterday at the opening of the conference, which was regarded as, the first major test of President Truman's postwar labor wngc pol- icy 'What progress, if any. was accomplished was not immediately learned. Public statements from both la- bor management spokesmen in the oil industry were given while telcEram from Secretary of Labor Schwcllcnbach, stating that the meeting "must not be per- mitted to fall." was read at the opening of the session, O. A. Knight, president of the CIO 'Oil Workers International Union, which culled the strikes in m dispute for an industry-wide 30 per cent wage rate Increase, was labor's spokesman at the parley. He said the union demands were justified in view of the In- creased earnings in the oil Indus- try He cited that 14 of the 15 companies involved made a net profit of last year, 100 per cent Increase over 1839. Representatives of nine major oil companies were at the confcrcncr. and their position was given at the outset. They contended the itrikes, which hit In Texas, Illi- nois. Indiana. Michigan, Ohio, West Virginia and Massachu-.etts, vio- lated terms of present collective bargaining contract agreements between the union and companies. Justice William L. Knous or the Colorado supreme court, heading the three-man conciliation panel, expressed hope for a "quick set- Curiosity didn't kill "Mac." New York kitty, but it sure did cure his nosincss. In top photo Mac pokes around a box and knocks off the lid Look out there! Well, we told you, that wasn't any catnip you got; it was a turtle, who nipped your nose. ______ PAA Workers At Miami To Strike? MIAMI. about J.OOO maintenance workers of Miami division of Pan Amerlcnni Airways threatening to strike, Thursday morning, the sir line; declares its layoff policy must be continued "if we are to survive economically." One of the principal complaints, in the proposed strike is the dls-; 500 of the Saigon Natives Europeans, Burn Market Fire Destroys Food After Natives Steal Engines; British Rescue 31 SAIGON. Annamltes (natives) who kidnaped 41 Europeans and possibly killed 10 yesterday burned down their marketplace last night. The spectacular fire, a few blocks from the city's center, raged uncontrolled through Saigon's largest market place colorful collection of booths and sheds. i French who gathered in excited clusters on Main Street watched the j flames and charged that Annamites stole Saigon's fire engines three j days ago, now were engaged in carrying out their threat to.burn the city to the ground. Annamitcs formerly composed a fire brigade which they now had the city with- abandoned, leaving out firemen. Two platoons of British troops driving across the northern part of the city Tuesday afternoon rescued 31 of the 40 Frenchmen kidnapped by Annamitcs. a British hcadquart- crs spokesman announced, The British said nine were miss- ing and probably slain They said first reports did not children were Involved; but one French officer said he was positive that some women and children had been kidnapped. British Officer Kidnaped The British' also reported the of a British officer, a f war. Seized by Ground Is Broken For Schools Gym Ground-breaking ceremonies at the Memorial Gym ,slte were held this morning at 10 o'clock, with James Pace, president of the school board, turning the first shovel-full of soil. The new gymnasium will be erected immediately back of thfej high school building, across! German Problems Occupy Big Five At London Meet United States Will Recognize Hungary; Policy In Pacific Discussed Big Five council of foreign min- isters delved into German problems today in an atmo- sphere suddenly improved by a disclosure that the United States was preparing to recognize Hungary. This would cross out one of tne Balkan political conflicts banring an understanding between Russia and the west, John Foster Dulles, Republican adviser to the American delega- tion, cancelled his projected tour of European capitals in search of information useful to the peace formula. It is understood that Dulles will seek a .more precise definition of UJ5. foreign policy. Meet Ends Soon The conference ie expected to end tomorrow or Friday, at the latest. Planes were waiting to car- ry home Secretary of State Byrnes and Russian Foreign Commissar V. M. Molotov, American officU.ls said they were going ahead of the British In their attitude toward Hungary. Informants at thi: British foreign office said the British view re- mained the same that the Hun-, garian government is unrepresent- ative. The regime was established under Soviet sponsorship after the Red army overran the kingdom. Both the United States and Britain are known to be disturbed by the Russian-Hungarian econom- ic treaty which gives -Moscow con- trol over at least half of Hun- gary's economy. The American at- titude as outlined here, however, is that the present Hungarian government is acceptable provided it pledges free elections. Members several delegations who earlier had commented on the growing tension at the conference could not explain fully the new friendliness, but It was pointed out that the discussions had veered away from the knotty question of Russian insistence on participation in Mediterranean control and American-British demands for a voice in Balkan affairs. Pacific Discussion there has been con- siderable discussion of the policy of the United States in the Pa- cific, Soviet Foreign Commissar Vy- acheslav M. Molotov Is reported to have criticized U.S. policy in Japan sharply, complaining it was too soft, and asking establishment of an Allied council. The Chinese, while defending U.S. policy in Japan as proceed- ing with necessary 'caution, were reported favorable to the Idea of a control commission. Despite an official Paris predic- tion last night that the council would wind up its conference to- day, turning over unresolved ques- Jap Anny, Navv Is Stripped Of All Equipment Stocks Of Food And Clothing Goes To Famine Threatened Civilians (NEA Telephoto) Rancher Is Given1 Entire Nation Will Hear 15-Year Sentence Of Valley's Main Street I IWIIllriilJi I UH mUlUCr UUUgC part Qf Nationai Advertising Drive The U S is going to hear about the Strangest Street in America. Ke story "offhe that stretches from Brownsville yond Hidalgo counties, binding Jury Renders Verdict In Trial Following a stirring plea by As- sistant District Attorney Lorimer Brown that Pedro Garza had re- sorted to gangster tactics in the killing of Lupe Balderas In Rio Hondo last September. a Jury detailed 'data on the Valley brought back a verdict of guilty j jts people. and assessed the Rio Hondo ranch-! ThE projcct of telling the Val- er a fifteen year sentence yester- day. It was the. first time in several years that1'such a heavy sentence had been rh'eted put .for similar crime. Garza had entered a plea of not guilty. Balderas was killed last Septem- ber 10 as he was paying his water district' dues in Rio Hondo. Ac- cording to Investigating officers, Oarzn had left his car with the door open and the motor running an he darted into the building to shoot Balderas. Brown, in his plea to the jury. argued that the killing of Bal- deras was vastly different from the ordinary "baile killings" of the Rio Grande brush country. The fact that Garza entered a populated area, and went into an office crowded with prominent community businessmen to shoot Balderas, changed the complexion of the murder and branded it as Brown said. By RUSSKL BRINES TOKYO Uncon- firmed Japanese reports to- night said that Emperor Hirohito will meet General MacArthur tomorrow, pre- sumably at the U. S, Em- bassy which is the supreme Allied commander's resid- ence. Well informed sources earlier had said such a meet- in mod- ern Japan was bcinp ar- ranged but had cited no date. Official armji sources remained silent but MacArthur's public rela- tions office announced that corres- pondents would meet at 9 a. m. to- morrow i "I p. m. tonight. Central War Time) lor instructions on cov- ering "a forthcoming event." i General MacArthur today strip- [ped Japan's army and navy of all I equipment.- directing that their ______________________ I of food and clothing be turn- VX7M1 T II cd over to the famine-threatened T-wo Outstanding Will i en story clvlllan population under a strict i acjountlrg. Want Hirohito Out A member of Japan's House of Peers, meanwhile, proposed in an Interview that Emperor Hirohito withdraw from all political affairs. In order to eliminate "the clique around the throne." and thus make democracy possible. If the Emperor withdrew to the- background _______'-I and avoided klet giving quis Yoshicr ed. there would be no clique surrounding him. Reorganization of the Japanese agency through which occupation headquarters works its will upon the conquered nation also began to- ,day. to shake off clinging domlna- tion by Japanese foreign office personnel. i Occupation forces will be bol- stered soon by Chinese troops, said a Chinese government spokesman in Chungking today. He did not re- port their numbers or expected date of arrival.) The Japanese central liaison of- fice through which MacArthur'i commands supposedly are effectu- ated, is being' broadened to include contained in an expensive and ley's story is sponsored by three Valley daily newspapers, The Brownsville Herald, Valley Morn- ing star or Harlingen, and The McAllen Evening Monitor. It Is the story of a small area containing a metropolitan popula- tion by OPA ration book It is the story of howj 152.509 of these Individuals live within 20 minutes of their nearest shopping out of ten buyers who live in 20-mlnutc j prOgreas Qn KemOVing Nazis Questioned Eisenhower Calls Patton TV Make Personal Report zone. It is only ten minutes market for six out of these shoppers. The uniqueness of this Valley city, persons living along this 65-mile street, is being; representatives of all fields of gov- ui nciua fsv-- FRANKFURT ON MAIN ernmcnlt Japanese government -----f wifv i vi along this 65-mile street, is Being, Qen Eiscnhower summoned Gen.; .ces saio-. Thc office previously pointed out by the three Valley, s Pntton today to make hgd chanee to act. how- on Denazification; since the Japanese foreign pone o s papers In an area advertising cam-, personni r paign that is costing thousands of progress ln dollars. personni rtrpuii. wn .ever, since LIIC progress in Bavaria. office had been doling out MacAr- Lt. Gen. Walter B. Smith. Bsen- lhur.s to appropriate Jap- hower's chief of staff, announced governmental departments for 'that, thp sunreme commander Part of National Campaign nowers cniei ui amn, The story of course is intended i tnat the supreme commander had A fltt Thc story of course is intenaea i tnat the supreme comma naer naa action to sell national advertisers on the j caned for an immediate report on Reorganization Approved .Valley as a market but it alsOjjMazjs still holding office in Third; The japanese privy council ap- Brown said. ...I serves the purpose of telling the Army territory and also had re- Broved tne reorganization at ft spe- in Mondays trial, Vallev story to thousands of peo- quested Patton to give a Gonzales was given a five-year, va j advertising of Q Q f DClnK _ r the cancellation of war contracts. Thf workers have asked that their demands be met by 6 o'clock tonight. Charles N. Smollkoff, CIO director in Miami, said. Thc demands Include rnncclltaion.H ot lay-off of the 500 workers urid 48 hours' pay for 40 hours work. In Its first official statement regarding the threatened strike, PAA said It would not curtail Its lay-off policy nncl It was "utterly unreasonable for nnyonc to ex- pect the company to continue on ;hr payroll any person or persons whose services arc not required." COTTON PRICES Noon cotton prices 5 to 45 cents a bnle lower. Oct. 22.61, Dec. 22.85. Men 22.80. DON PEDRO fnilcd to arrive nt the of flee, this morning but his Sev- enth Son carried' on. "Papa wants me to tell you he u Indisposed to- the son stated. "O v e r w o r k we re- marked. "I suppose so." replied, "but I am not sure.] Papa was out late k night and he U complained of x .V around thri HSR this morn- p as .wr> I did notL ur.vtion him clriscly. "He called for ice ;.iiiclnc that wns to cool him off. "There was no mention made of weather but I will venture to ay It will be cloudy." "Tell your Papa we understand whole we said as the ion left. (OctAiltd Wealhrr Report Para Fighting went on into the third consecutive day, and wax the most widespread since unrest became I riotous on Sept. 2. Annamltes took over arms from surrendering Jap- anese nt that lime. They attacked the French, killing seven. i Indian guards said that last night's market place fire was clum- i slly set. They added that they saw 'Japanese soldiers in the vicinity when the fires flared up. The fighting Tuesday occurred in all areas of the city except the 1 center of the French sectqr. I Annamites seized the slaughter house in mW-afternoon, leaving the city meatless. Fire Destroys Food An estimated four-day supply of fresh foodstuffs were left Tuesday, (See Page Two. Valley Awaiting El Azucar Water water but I Approximately 30 local men and women prominent In school affairs attended the 'ceremonies. Reverend Kcrmlt Gibbons, tor of the First Methodist dedicated the site as a monument to those from Brownsville who fell in battle and who participated in this country's wars, John Barren, superintendent of schools, Introduced Pace, recounting the tremendous job the schoql board head had done 'in backing the construction of a gymnasium for Brownsville. Other school officials In-attend- ance were Pablo valent, Leonel Garza, and Otto Manske, school board members; Mrs. M. G. junior high school principal; Dean Neal Nelson of the Junior college, Homev Hanna, high school prin- cipal; Head Coach Bob Martin, and Assistant Coach Pete Finch. Workmen of the Noser Con- struction Co. bcgnn staking off the foundations of the new build- Ing Immediately after the ground- breaking ceremonies. suspended sentence, after being found guilty of the murder of Juan Garcia at a La Paloma baile on February 24, 1945. the Valley and its virtues. queste aon accounting of his stewardship in (See OCCUPATION, Page 2.) BULLETINS A parched Rio Grande Valley j todav was holding Its throat, pa-, tlcntly awaiting the stream ofj newly-released water from Mex-j ICo's El Azucar Dam, released yes- terday. Thc water, observers said, should be past Rio Grande City today and in the Upper Valley areas throughout Thursday. To give Lower Valley sections! access to Azucnr water. Vnllev Water Conservation Assn. prora'tion committee has asked for n pumping holiday beginning; Thursday afternoon tit 6 o'clock.' The holiday will Inst until Sunday afternoon at 6 o'clock. In all Valley Irrigation areas, the demands for water was re- ported as heavy. With the Rio Grande in the Brownsville area at pool stage, local Irrigation pumps were working spasmodically. W. F. Barnholdt of the El Jardin (Sec WATER, Page Two.) Robot News Boy Makes Appearance NEW "robot news boy" will have its first public test next week in a subway station. The robot, a vending machine, dispenses up to 200 papers and gives change for a nlckle. Designed by Samuel Lcschin, it is said to bej virtually foolproof, and scrupulous j In its rejection of wrong coins and __. W f Jlgcf Is Set Tuesday Brownsville's War Chest day will be Tuesday, A. L, Colson. chair- mnn of the drive announced to-! day. O. M. Longnecker. Jr., has) been named treasurer of the drive, Colson said that an effort will be made to complete the drive on that day. All persons are urged to have their contributions ready when a War Chest representative calls for them. Headquarters for the drive will be set up on a booth on downtown Elizabeth street. AUSTIN The Ameri- can Civil Liberties Union today formally intervened In the Wil- liam Prescott Allen libel flllnr brief in the court of criminal appeals. WASHINGTON Meet- ing for the first time In 16 years to consider boosl- the House Ways and Mesins committee voted today lo rule out any reductions In excise levies at this time. Bavaria early next week. Jack Cronenwett, national Patton Pops Off vertlsing manager for the At R prcss conference called as: Group, told members of the Rd-jtnc Of Patton's recent re- vertising and editorial depnrt-j marl{ tnat "Nazism might well be ments about the campaign at a. compnred any political parties VATTPV TWO) Bl or Dcmo- (See VALLEY, Page Two.) Smith said Eiscnhower would permit no modification of his order that Nazis be removed "ruthlessly from public office, re- gardless of general efficiency." Patton acknowledged yesterday that his choice of words had been unfortunate. Asked what would happen if Patton's account of his stewardship in Bavaria was "not satisfad" Fritz Hofmokel. director of "i have no idea." of Brownsville, is in Houston! Policy Outlined for a meeting of the Gulf Ports Assn. Lull Reported In Oil Strikes Hofmokel Attends Gulf Port Meet HOUSTON Shutdown oi oil refineries along the Texas Gulf has reached a lull while union leaders in the Oil Workers international Union await the outcome of a labor-manage- ___ ________ ment mediation conference in Bavaria was "not Chicago. A union official announcea j yesterday, however, that plans are The chief of staff outlined Eisen- developing to bring an estimaiea Tim meeting, it was an- hower's policy with these points: oil field workers in the rer- nounccd, was called for the pur-> rs pocy w complete DenfcBJIication of niian Basin of west Texns mio Some Meat To Ration-Free Be Soon The gov- ernment is expected to announce tomorrow that hamburger, sausage and lunch meats made from lower grades of beef will be reduced to zero ration values Sept. 30. Secretary of Agriculture Ander- son disclosed last week that the three lowest grades of ncr, cutter, and be put on n zero ration value for the October rationing period. It Was Tough Puzzle To Solve DOLICE were puzzled for a while for grounds on which to hold Nativldad Garza, 50, of El Carmtfn Ranch. Thc arresting officer had charged Garza with "drunk and selling sugar." Since there was no law against selling sugar, officers thought the man could be held for peddling without a license. The arrest- ing officer, however, said Oarza was only taking orders for sugar. It then looked like a potential case of fraud. But police settled and just held Garza on the drunk charge. He was arrested nt an Adams Street fruit stand trying to convince the owner he should place an order for sugar. WASHINGTON -r (AP) A Roosevelt declaration of policy, stating there Is "no place in the community of nations" for the Franco government of Spain, was release" department, WASHINGTON Three of the fliers who participated in Gen. .Tames H, Ooolittle's raid on Tokyo in 1942 were cxeculeil by the Japanese, thr War De- partment disclosed today. o, pose of discussing and acting upor Germany's political, educational the wage dispute. several matters closely related to and economic life, as ruthlessly as i _______________________ L. B. Cooper of Odessa, Tex., the resumption of deep sea and required." j secretary of Local of the coastwise shipping. I 2. Care of displaced persons at j OWIU, said that local unions in The deliberations are expected! the cxpense of the Germans. I the Basin were setting up policy to last two or three days. Included! 3. Reestabllshment of an inter- committees in meetings this wecic. today" by" "the itate Jon the agenda are discussions of' nal economy so Germany could i From a general policy meeting touay oy n the Merchant Ships Sales Act; the mamtaln Hvlng standard not for Oct. 3, Cooper said, would come proposed appointment of a member I ;a plan for entertaining tne wage of the association to the U. S.1 (Sec PATTON, Pnge Two.) Maritime Commission; resumption of coastwise and intercoa sta 1 Police steamship services; Surplus Prop- "ariUlgenJ-O11CC erty disposal, the St. Lawrence. Obtain Canal Protect; Submerged and1 _ _, Reclaimed Lsnds proposal, Region-1 In JCWClry Inert i fight. OWUI i pay for members seek 52 40-hour work week. The strikes have closed three WASHINGTON Wll- Authorities legislation. Ming ot Police Chief E. Ham D Mitchell, former attor- i the, association's by-laws with the w; tod .nnounccd he Il.m u. Mal.itime Commission; and other confession in the ney general under President Hoo- ver, vyis chosen today as chief counsel for the joint congressional committee investigating the Jap- anese attack on Pearl Harbor. First Shipload Of Cocoanuts Arrives; It's "nuls to you" nt the Port j of Brownsville today. j Port officials have announced the'docking of Hie Carmen City, a Mexican freighter, with the first load of cocoanuts to be cleared through the Port of Brownsville. The cocoanut is" destined for Pan American Freezers, Ltd. It will be shredded and put up in consumer packages. F. H, Floyd, an official of the freezing firm, snld they would handle a boat load ouch .week, n; and oter Jwfl ft confesslon ln lhc subjects important to the efforts robbery in Hnrlingen of the Assn. of Port SRid lhc Hofmokcl, a member of both as-ined lul-i sfld two more suspects fnr' ai'r beng questioned in connection LIOI1H1 UL'JJUI itmi KJl I the locnl port. He will go to the burglary. No charges ton from Gnlvcston, have been brought against them. Something New In Burglaries COMETHING new in burglaries has added. J Brownsville police were called upon by Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Swann, 1221 S. E. Jackson Street, Harlingen, to locate a two-wheeled trailer which dlsappeaered. Mr and Mrs. Jackson had parked the trailer in front of a res- taurant while they had dinner. When they returned, the trailer had disappeared. It was found Inter abandoned on a local street plants at Houston, seven at Port Art.hur. thre at Texas City and two at Beaumont, An estimated workers are off ihe job. CIO workers who voted last week at two oil refineries and, (See OIL STRIKE. Page U Mexico Bank Given Monopoly On Silver MEXICO The Bank of Mexico is given a virtual mon- buying .cUing but decree published today. The Bank of Mexico alone carl export coin and bnr silver, and silver producers must, sell silver to the bank which will supply In- dustry, the decree provides. McALI.EN MARINE HONORED SAN FRANCISCO Among prisoners of war honored here yesterday as a symbolic group Marine Wnrr.-.nt Officer E, B. Ercanbrnck. McAllen,   

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