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Brownsville Herald Newspaper Archive: November 2, 1892 - Page 1

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Publication: Brownsville Herald

Location: Brownsville, Texas

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   Brownsville Herald (Newspaper) - November 2, 1892, Brownsville, Texas                                 > Mfitit^l^E BROWNSVILLE HERALD I SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 2. 2003.  and t^ Grande Valley  Tomorrow:  Cowboys look to get back in the win column against the Redskins in Sports.  THE  BB0WNSVILLE  Há  car  Broiwisvillè'PoUcé are offering a cash: award for information leSainp to thè arrest of suspects tied to a: string of car bm-glànès. ,  Over {hè"past two^^ least 20 vehicle break-ins  have'^één reported mainly on:.: the city's west side, Brownsvillepolice Cmdr. Abraham Delgado said.  PolicéTieliève juveniles could be involved, and they advise residents not to store valuables inside their cars where they can be seen.  Police are asking anyone with information about the break-ins. to-call the Crime Stoppers tip line at 546-8477.  > In other crime news, Brownsville police said a 21-year-old Sóuthmost man was arrested Friday for possessing 259 grams of ihàrijuana and 22 granis of cocaine after police received a Crime Stoppers tip.  Robert Cisneros was arraigned Saturday by Mimicipal Court Jùdgë René DèCoss. His bond was set $20,000 for the cocaihe charge and $10,000 for the marijuana charge.  The mah facefe felony chargés because the location of his arrèst at'thé 6600 block of Boca Chica Boulevard is a drug-free zone vwthin close proximity of a School, Delgado said.  > MJSSION  Students to compile magazine on colonia's history  Jacob Alaniz walked through El Granjeno Cemetery with a pen and notebook,,writing down the names of Madero residents who have been dead for decades.  The 12-year-old Leal Elementary School student roamed the cemetery with 14 of his gifted and talented classmates, looking for information they will use to produce a magazine abpiit the history of the Madero colonia. The colonia was incoiporated into Mission in 1998.  Madero residents never had their own cemetery, so the studërits had to come to the 140-year-old cemetery three miles from the colonia to look into the past, said Vicente Gai-za, cemetery chairman.  Studëhts hope the names they find will lead them to family members with stories, to publish in the magazine. Throùgh their research, the students are discovering Ma:aero has a long oral history. '  - îm .iwiPmiWi (jiiiaut' > i  > PHARR  Severe flood zones devalue neighborhood's property  Since Lawrence Sema moved his f^ily into a Plantation Country Club home in 2001, his property value has dropped nearly $40,000.  When city officials approved the construction of his home in 2000, no one noticed that Sema and dozens of his soon-torbe neighbors were in a severe flood zone, records show.  According to a Federal Emergency Management Agency map, regular rains can bring up to three feet of water to the area.  If the recent pattem of rain continues, many Plantation houies are at risk of severe damage, the map shows. That risk requires that homeowners buy flood insurance, which goes up in price every inch a building is below city. code.  Sema's home was built 18 inches above street level. But building codes require it be double that for Plantation's flood zone.  Getting it Right  r  >;CORRECTIONS/CLARIFICATiONS POLICY  It is the policy of The Brownsville Herald to correct errors in a timely manner. Corrections and clarification! will be published in this space. To inquire about corrections, readers may call an editor.  982-6610 982-6681 982-6616 982-6618  Lotto  >rTEXAS LOHERY RESULTS  Winning numbers, Saturday, November 2:  ; ililexaK 6-20-24^32^^^ Pick 3 Dqy: 3-4-8 Night: 3-5-5 £ iCasii live: 14^5^^21-25  SPORTS  r oW  What's inside  VALLEY & STATE LIFESTYLE  VIEWPOINTS  fill gSSiSiH  «  J 1 • !,> .1 i-  Texas rolls over  Nebraska  B1  City offers peek at Locals feel the Ambition to lead Children's Musuem freedom of the road powers Kerry CI D1 El  Migrant Health Fair draws hundreds to community center  Assistance:  Citizens receive free vaccinations.  BY ALISON BESHUR  THE BROWNSVILLE HERALD  Ifears streamed dovm Daisy Yamileth Martinez's face as her mother carried her out of an examining room. With a gentle embrace and a , wipe under thieinorè; thé 3^yearold's tears quickly dried up and her frown turned into a modest smile.  Despite a brief moment of disconifort, Leonor Betancourt felt a great sense of relief - it was the first time her daughter had received a vaccine.  On Saturday, Martinez got eight doses - including chick-enpox, hepatitis-A, hepatitis B, polio, flu, tetanus, diphtheria, pneumonia and measles.  Betancourt and her daughter were among nearly 500 attendees Saturday to the eighth annual Health Fair for Migrant Families at the Brownsville Community Health CenW.  The event was a collaborative effort between tiie BCHC and the Brownsville Independent School District. Participants received free immunizations, dental screenings, glucose testing and information about blood pressure, higher education, heart disease and diabetes.  Nearly 40 women learned how to administer seK-exami-nations for breast cancer. Nearly 100 attendees got cholesterol screenings and about 80 visitors sat in on a teaching about diabetes.  Not all attendees were migrant families, although the health fair was held principally held to serve and to renter migrant families living in the area and to inform them about progi'ams designed to work around their transient lifestyles.  Thousands of families t^i-cally , return to Brownsville from farms in other parts of the country during September and October, lb justify the federal funding it receives, the BCHC must maintain current  BMD DOflERIY/THE BROWNSVILLE HERALD  Jesus Bedartes and his wife Rosa give information Saturday to Olga Cadriei and and Mary Campos as Rosario Garcia looks on during the eighth annual Health Fair for Migrant Families.  information on the families that it serves.  "While they're here, we want them to get the (health) appointments," said Terry Davis, the BCHC's director of nursing.  Sylvia Alaniz, coordinator for migrant services for the BISD, said the event helps the district recruit students for the General Educational  Development, or GED, program and to make referrals to agencies that offer health care.  "If you have a healthy child, it will secure attendance at school," Alaniz said.  Natalia DeLeon, a mother of  four children, is a patient at the clinic. She attended Saturday's health fair to find out about dental care and to set up a screening for her 3-year-old son.  "I didn't know I was supposed to bring him every six months," DeLeon said. "I didn't do this with my other two children. This (event) really helps the people a lot."  The Brownsville  Community Health Center is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call 548-7400.  Hot check writers get grace period  BY BRITTMEY BOOTH  THE BROWNSVILLE HERALD  The Cameron County District Attorney's office plans to issue approximately 200 arrest warrants this month for people accused of writing bad checks.  The Sheriff's  Department, local police and constables will serve the warrants at suspects' homes and businesses.  But suspected hot check writers can avoid criminal charges if they report to the District Attorney's office by Nov. IS and absolve their debts by eru-olling in the "Get Out of Jail" program.  "We're just asking the community to participate by coming in and taking care of (bad checks)," said District Attorney Yolanda DeLeon.  After the grace period, law enforcement agencies will issue arrest warrants and take offenders to the Cameron County jail.  If found guilty of issuing worthless checks, residents be fined up to while repeat offenders could face charges of theft by check.  Depending on the number of hot checks and the amount of money involved, offenders could also face jail time.  DeLeon said her office collects around $750,000 a year in hot checks.  The District Attorney's office started annual hot check round-ups three years ago as a way to help local merchants. During last year's round up, they collected $78,000 and made approximately 150 arrests.  "There are private enterprises that colleet (hot checks), but if peoplle don't pay, (merchants) aré out of their money," DeLeon said. "If you don't ever enforce it, most people will blow you off. This is one way we show we mean business."  Tb report an outstanding hot check, call tiie District Attorney's hot check division at 544-0849 or 427-8049.   

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