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Brownsville Herald Newspaper Archive: September 13, 1892 - Page 1

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Publication: Brownsville Herald

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   Brownsville Herald (Newspaper) - September 13, 1892, Brownsville, Texas                                 ìtmiò  Voi 107, No. 71  I Sunday  50 cents daily / $1.25 Sunday  ©1997 The Brownsville Herald. All rights reserved.  Born on the 4th of july 18 92  Private schools H.S. football  TODAY  High 94 ^Low 75  The right choice for some Page Al3  Lobos, Lions battle into 2 OTs Page DÍ  Clinton fìghts back  By REBECA RODRIGUEZ Austin American-Statesman  BLANCO, Texas — As the sun beats down mercilessly on the dry Texas Hill Country brush, the intox-icatingly earthy smell of frankincense fills the cool air inside a tiny, candle-lit chapel on a hill. Men draped in black robes with socks on their feet and coverings on their heads stand before a small altar and sing solemn songs of praise — a cap-pella — to their God.  These men, Russian Orthodox monks, have dedicated their lives to living in Christ's image. Staying focused means living apart from the secular world. But this summer the monks, along with millions of Texans, have had to face a common demon: drought.  Months of parched weather and nary a raindrop have cooked the monastery's crops and thrown the monks into heavy debt. Recent rains, about 4 inches, have been a blessing, the monks say, but by last month, much of the crop damage had been done.  As more monks enter the fold each year, the scarcity of water becomes more critical, and the monks say it will take more than an occasional rain to sustain them through another summer like this one.  Christ of the Hills Russian Orthodox monastery is a 105-acrc compound nestled in the hills of Blanco County, about 4 miles from the city of Blanco. Founded by Father Benedict more than 30 years ago, it is the only monastery in Texas devoted to the teachings of the 1,000-year old Russian Orthodox church.  The monastery houses the weeping icon of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Visited by thousands of pilgrims each year who lay rosaries and other religious tokens around its edges, the icon is said to weep tears of sweet, fragrant myrrh for the sins of humankind.  For Father Pangratios, originally from Kerrville, the monastery has filled his every need for the past 18 years. "This was the first place that had everything for me under one roof," Pangratios said.  Monastic life begins at 3:30 a.m., when the monks awaken and begin individual prayer time. They come together seven times daily to meditate and worship in services open to the public. Their main service is between 1 and 2 p.m., during the time when Christ is believed to have hung on the cross.  Peppered between worship are the day's chores, such as preparing meals, washing dishes, painting buildings and tending to the monastery's many flower and vegetable gardens.  The gardens, located in the heart of the compound, are normally a source of pride and sustenance for the community. The flowers — (See DROUGHT, All)  World reaction one of dismay  By FAWN CRAZO And JEFFREY FLEiSHIMAN Knight RIdder Newspapers  As details of President Clinton's sexual misadventures with Monica Lewinsky were reported Saturday around the world, leaders, opinion-makers and people on the street reacted with appalled — and often very concerned — amazement.  While there was some outrage over Clinton's behavior, the deepest and most immediate response appeared to be dismay over the timing of the scandal. Many simply couldn't understand how a sex scandal could bring down the most powerful man in the world at a time of extreme crisis in many corners of the earth.  "With Russia in crisis, NATO crying out for leadership in Kosovo, (See WORLD, Page A12)  See pages 4, 5 for additonal stories.  Access complete report at:  www.brownsvilleherald.com   A "hit-and-run smear campaign'  By STEVEN THOMAS Knight Ridder Newspapers  WASHINGTON — As the Congress and the country continued Saturday to pore over the details of President Clinton's once-private life, his lawyers insisted that a report charging him with impeachable offenses is a "hit-and-run smear campaign" that uses lurid details to cover up the lack of substantial legal charges.  In a 42-page analysis, they argued there is no reason for Congress to even consider impeaching Clinton. Point by point, they either disputed the facts in the charges or the conclusions that the charges were serious enough to warrant removing a president from office.  On the most detailed charge against the president, that he lied about specific physical contacts with Monica Lewinsky, his lawyers did not (See SMEAR, PageAU)  Quiet life, big impact  Relative of city founder described as "down to earth'  KARISA KiNG The Brownsville Herald  There were summers in the Hamptons. An untold fortune worth of donations to charities, scholarships and philanthropic pursuits. Family jaunts with the Rockefellers. A medical degree with honors from Harvard. Crosscountry trips in his private railroad car.  The life of James Stillman, who died last week at the age of 94 after congestive heart failure, was not an ordinary one. It was nothing less than what might have been expected of the great grandson of the man who founded Brownsville 150 years ago and the grandson of the man who created what is now known as Citicorp.  Brownsville's history is elaborately intertwined with the Stillman story — it was from the rising Stillman family fortune that Brownsville took its start. Elizabeth Street, downtown Brownsville's main strip, and St. Charles Street bear the names of Stillman's great-grandparents. And St. Frances Street was named after his great-great grandfather.  Despite a family legend weighted with historic American visionaries, what emerges from the descriptions of Stillman over the years is a picture of a quiet life, one he led with little pretense or outward regard for his own prestige and status. He was a doctor, a graduate of Princeton and Harvard Medical School, but he was most comfortable when people called him "Bud."  With the kind of family wealth that could have afforded him a life of leisure, Stillman chose to carve out his own successful career as a gynecologist in New York City, where he was born and raised.  Courtesy photo  James Stillman Inscribes lettering on an explosive device in 1997 in honor of South Padre Island Mayor Ed Cygan,  It was not until the late 1950s that Stillman moved to Brownsville, closing the doors of his medical practice with its Fifth Avenue type clientele and leaving behind what could have been a high society life.  "Here's a man so successful in what some would say was the city in the U.S., yet he came back to his roots to lead a relatively simple life," says Bob Vezzetti, a Stillman family history expert in Brownsville.  Locally, little is known about Stillman's life before he came to Brownsville in 1957. He had six children with his first wife, who preceded him death. By most accounts, it was his attraction to the Stillman heritage that drew  him here with his second wife, Catherine Brown, and their two children.  • •••  Stillman's great grandfather, (See STILLMAN, Page All)  Drug-fighting grants released by White House  By EUN-KYUNG KIM The Associated Press  WASHINGTON — President Clinton ordered the distribution of more than $8.7 million in new drug-fighting grants Saturday and told the nation he would  "stay focused on your business."  Clinton, in his weekly radio address, made no mention of Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr's report to Congress but acknowledged he had "an exhausting and  difficult week."  The "high impact, low red tape" drug-fighting grants are being awarded to 93 community-based organizations nationwide. The bulk of the money will go to urban areas and rural communities.  The grants go to programs that focus on uniting parents, teachers, religious leaders and law enforcement agencies to help "give kids an option after school from 3 to 7 p.m. and on weekends," Clinton's drug czar, retired  Gen. Barry McCaffrey, said.  While overall drug use has dropped by half since 1979, Clinton said drug-abuse trends among young people suggest half of this year's high school seniors will have smoked marijuana by the  time they graduate.  "When we know that drugs lead to crime, to failure in school, to fraying of families and neighborhoods, we know we must do better," the president said in his weekly radio broadcast.  Abby ..............10D  Amusements.. r(7D  Business..........1E  Calendar........AIO  Classified........1C  Editorial..........A14  Entertainment ..Dd Lifestyle............B1  Obituaries........DB  Outdoors..........E5  Sports..............D1  Valley/State ....Al3  Visit our Web Site at  www.brownsvUieherald.com   "•"unuUiVl  Don Pedro  says:  Don Pedro walked Into the newsroom wearing his favorite UT jersey.  'Are you still wearing that shirt," asked the dty editor. "Aren't you embarrassed about their second straight loss to those pratty boys from La-la Land?* "Like anything In life, you win some and you k>se soma. I sUil stick with my team.'  ■I guass you are right: saki the dty editor. "I just hope the Cowboys do a better Job in Denver today.'  ■WSIPE!  □ Smithtonian, Page A2  □ Storm roundup, Page A3 a Racist float, Page A7  □ Mexico flood, PageAS   

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