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Amarillo Globe Newspaper Archive: August 14, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Amarillo Globe

Location: Amarillo, Texas

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   Amarillo Globe, The (Newspaper) - August 14, 1947, Amarillo, Texas                               FOR Seeking City, County Highway Cooperation By CAL BKUMLEX Possibility of joint city-county participation in furnishing the state with a "fffat-ot- way for an eight-lane expressway, proposed by state highway officials, through Ama- rillo was presented today. M 'ii u Lubbock, which found itself facing a traffic problem similar to Amanllo 8. has already started a program to solve the congestion. In the) j. _ n> i 1 -___HIi.   through the city proper; and second, to provide routing around the edgre of the city for through traffic. To finance the plan, the city It committed to the expenditure of approximately the county about SlOO.tfoO and state and fed- eral highway sources to about S3.- The total investment is ex- pected to approximate or exceed before the work is com- pleted, probably durinjr late 1948, Key highways in thc plan to through traffic around the edge of the city arc US Highways 62, 84 and 87. and State Highway 280. Collec- tively, they completely encircle the city and will enable all through tra'ffic to avoid residence and down- town streets. Key within the city are Fourth anrf Nineteenth streets, extending from cast to west, and Avenues A. H. Q and College from north to south. Their design is intended to speed traffic which has to move through the city and to provide the most convenient access to particular points, such as the industrial dis- tricts that individual drivers may wish to rrach. Broadly speaking, the work involves the widening of pave- ments, in most, cases to GO feet, and the securing of rights-of-way for widening and approaches to sues thoroughfares as Avenue A and Q. so that sharp turns can be re- placed with gradual curves. The bisrscst single project In the city, ;mcl on which work Is most advanced. Is on Nineteenth Street skirtinjr thc edge of the buslnew district and leading into the most densely settled residential areas as well as to highways toward the west and southwest. This project will cost around 000 under the general cooperative _.------ plan being followed. The city's port notice in the United Nations Security Council to- day that she would veto the new American and Australian proposals for a UN border watch in StatI Photo This js North West Eighth Avenue looking west from parallel service .roads. (Other highway, pictures on page 6.) RIVER ROAD COMMUNITY VOTES SATUR- DAY ON7 SCHOOL TAX BOOST PAGE 28 32 PAGES PRICE FIVE CENTS dorses the price investigation just undertaken has ordered the Justice partmenfs anti-trust division to investigate food, clothing and housing prices to deter- mine whether there are any conspiracies to raise prices. A reporter at his news conference asked Mr. Truman if he meant that he hoped Clark could check the rise in prices or simply point out those who have combinccT to keep prices up beyond normal prof- it margins. The President said thc reporters Birth of a Nation PaloDuro Park Bond Issue Sold -v thousand 'dollais worth of Palo Duro State Pat It Revenue bonds has been puichased, assuring' the state park will remain in state hands, the .Amarillo Cham- ber, of Commerce was notified last KARACHI, Pakistan (formerly Aug. 14 a cere- mony lasting less than 15 minutes, Great Britain wielded its 200-year rule of India today, and thc new nation of Pakistan was born. Viscount Mountbattcn, until to- day thc British viceroy of all India, cut thc British reins on would have to wait and see, but. tho subcontinent of he thought that the investigation persons, and let it divide Into the would be more likely to point Out! Dominion of Pakistan and up; the Hindu of India. It wan thc climax of 50 years of bloody Indian agitation for independence. Thousands, of sweating Indians stood in the streets to shout "Long live Pakistan" as Mount- batten drove to the new state's tiny constituent assembly halL There, to thc accompaniment of booming .artillery, Mountbattcn turned over thc government of Pakistan to Its aewly-choscn gov- ernor general, Mohammed AH Jinncih. Mountbattcn, in a brief farewell, statement, promised Britain's co- operation with the new state. .TJnnah replied that his govern- ment would foster racial'' and political tolerance, but even as spoke amid the- ccrmonial trappings, Hindus and Moslems scattered over India were batter- ing each other to death In con- tinued rioting. those who are holding prices unnecessarily. On a related matter. Mr. Tru- man said he has a cabinet foot! committee looking into the crop outlook to determine whatever steps may be necessary as to Capitol, the price situa- tion was getting attention from those Congress members still in u.oo, Wolcott, Michigan Republican, expressed belief a "gen- eral price decline" is in thc Chairman of the House Banking Committee, Wolcott is regarded as spokesman for many House Re- publicans on price and rental mat- tC-'lt would be a grave mistake to put price controls back on again Wolcott told a reporter. That would slow UP production, and we must have production if WR are he believed Infla- tion has "reached Its peak and we are reaching'the saturation point. general price decline is coming. At his press conference, the President, in blunt language, ac- cused Congress of tearing up the Labor Department. That was one of thc accomplishments of Coti- cress. he said at a news confer- ence. Quickly then, Mr. Truman added that he has no doubt the Labor Department will he rebuilt it can't he per- manently torn up. ________ ___ President Truman also told tht; Uon.s shiirc or lhg raln_ The Hcrc. newsmen that he sees nothing on. ford wcntncr Sh0wed 1.70 Even Mohandas K. Gandhi, the father of Indian' Independence and the most revered man in India, saw his Calcutta head- quarters stoned. Thc bitter Hindu-Moslem strife over irreconcilable religious dif- ferences forced .partition of India. The division was intended to let each .sect rule its own followers, but the fate of 565 princely Hindus and Moslems live in almost equal number M been left to boundry commissions for later settlement. The riches of -India, which prompted Queen Elizabeth to charter an Indian Trading Com- pany in 1600, were split between the two new states.' Pakistan, with a population of 60 million persons, controlled 200 thousand square miles of land, including- India's': food and jute producing! areas, The companion state of the Dominion of India possessed In- dia's big cities, ijrrcat. Industrial resources, 600 thousand square miles of land, and 200 million jicoplc. It also was expected eventually to absorb, the 85 million persons living In the princely states now disputed. The two nations Into which India was divided remain do- minions Inside 'the -British com- monwealth of nations until June 30, 1948. At that time, they will decide whether to leave the commonwealth, which is held .to- gether ...loosely by- the British crown _ Unprecedented independence celebrations -were p'l aimed night by N. H.'-Lee, executive. sec- retary' of the Texas State Park Board Russian Raps Greek Setup LAKE SUCCESS, NY, Mug. 14 Russia, accusing the United States of "the crudest form of interference" in Greek internal affairs, served the troubled Balkans. Deputy Foreign Andrei Gro.myko struck back at the latest pro- posals of the western countries with a lashing attack on th of rights-of-way has ...imense problem. It has reouired dealings wirh hundreds of individual owners of property re- jonired in whole or in Dart for-wid--- niche world knows, who .js.xeally. in- jcned or -rerouted, thoroughfares. i terf in Greece, he said. Start of construction on some units "Tr-no wildest interference into Of the diSDOsal system such as por- e Truman 1 f id lUfe the Once "I "The crudest interference into I the internal .affairs of Greece eman- v etc American aT-rates at present n-om the united j. II Gromykb said. It was the tempi to install perma-ifil.st.tlme the.Soviet delegate aban- 1 i ir "niKl.nm nf not the Greek frontier. Grorayko's carefully pre- several times. was Russia's Gromyko emphasized that Rus- was loibt, a. b ard MJCUCU Sia ncvcr could accept proposals According to the telesram ad- first reply to the United for border observers in dressed toiler B. Baxter" execute' Stales plan to 10SS the Greece Both vice-prcs.dentpf the chamber of feans case mto the Genera U ri A bonds la the commerce, scries A bonds in thc amount of were sold to James C. Tucltcr arid Company, an Austin bonding company, and scries B In the same amount were throughout India, but the blaze j purchased by thc Commerce Trust of fireworks was Intermingled with .the blaze of gunfire herald- injr the birth pangs of the new country. Military police using automatic 'rifles fired ;frequently oh rioters in Lahore and Amrisiar, two .dis- puted cities In North India. In 24 hours, the walled city of Lahore suffered: "60 killed and 100 wounded. Huge fires blazed. In Calcutta and ..nearby How- persons were killed and five 'injured. Gandhi, in ,a dra- matic move to end religious riot- ing, moved into. an embattled area of CalcnttHi 'The building he occupied was battered: by rocks which a crowd ,of ZOO hurled. Thc building's Windows were shattered. All around him' were burned- out victims of .earlier dis- turbances. On the day that In- dia received thc independence he had devoted his life to win, Gandhi had nothing to t say. 3x5 windmill, timbers and Redwood sid- InE. SCO John Maynard Lbr. BOO W, Sib Advance nknttnir classes night. Kollctr 'Palace.. fith A Jefferson, Tempo of Panhandle Rains Increasing Local showers last night poured a cooling-drink for spotted sec- tions of the parched Panhandle. Ten stations on the Texas High Plains reported some ft___ Wl n .V, rt ,1 t-1. flf VM C t'.l 1 Co. of Kansas City. The Kansas City Bank held the original paper on the park land. Last summer.it agreed to postpone foreclosure procedure on the prop- erty until ;Nov. 1947; giving the state park board and the Legislature time to take action to save the park. The Legislature approved the is- suance of the worth of revenue bonds ,last spring. The bonds will bear 3 per cent inter- est. In. expressing his satisfaction at the news of thc bond purchase. Virgil Patterson, president of thc chamber of commerce, said, "Now- that the 'ownership question has been settled thc chamber will ap- point a committee to assist thc state parks board in every pos- sible way." To Increase the revenue, he -pointed out, one of the major problems is thc improvement nf the roadways and the'park faclli- tlcn. "We pltn to contact the state highway commission in the neat- future in the hope of securing some aid in roadway development in the park Mr. Patterson said. "A comprehensive program for the development of all state parks- will be laid before the next Texas Legis- lature. The recent Legislature iail- ed to act on 'a similar program- pre- Assembly if a- new Soviet veto blocks action by the council. Gromyko said "foreign inlerfer-. ence" 1 of the disposal system such as por- tion of Avenues A and Q still awaits the securing of rights-of-way. In the vast majority of cases property has been obtained without great difficulty and at moderate cost. In a few instances, condem- nation proceedings have been nec- essary. In others, negotiations are continuing. Officials estimate that more than 90 per cent of the needed rights-of-way have been secured- COSTLY ICE KALAMAZOO, Mich., Aug. 14 (U.R) driver Robert Sparks ca- reened around a corner, crashed into a car and caused a traffic Jam that took police 10 minutes to un- Greece and Albania, Bul- and Yufro'slavia threat to nc'icc ouuiv Inasmuch as Russia vetoed the j snarl. Hauled into court. Sparks ex- original American proposal for a; plained: "I was holding __an ice UNITED NATIONS Page 2 cream bar in my left hand. Ten stations on the Texas wign reporbea yjctory Day passed although only five had appreciable amounts of than half :servpd in Texas today, an inoh. The Lone Star Sta Texas forgets To Celebrate Victory Day By The Associated Press i betwe'e'n" and an- Victory Day passed amlost unob- for the past four years. This Students To Begin Enrolling Sept. 2 More than Amarillo school children will answer school bell. Sept. 2. At that time, students in the senior and jun.or high schools w.Il d.g out the lony forgotten report cards and register for the new term. within the district. rollment will continue throu-h Sept. 3. All of the various schools in Arn- Elementary students will report Sept. 3. Classes Independent I seated late in the session." According to Mr. Baxter, the reve- nue from the park has averaged .between and an- nually for the past four years. This vi'jj v "MIV 1-r-i-- in i. could- be incrfiftscd ii toe fa inoh. I The Lone Star State gave, per the canyon more accesible Hereford, which nacl .84 Inches the-night before, again.cornered tne capita, more sons and daughters to and facujties were improved, he democratic convention any- tion gauging only mcnes. yu- _. the national commitr.ee de- servers, however, indicated the 9110 UHC AMD He said he had _ not _ ex- was much heavier in downtown faftfofa Rjollng aid recovery. As fo' politic.1; Mr. Truman said, Amarillo's catch was extremely thai he would. r'nvor holding the small, with the English Field sta- 1948 Democratic convention gauging only .Clinches. Ob- where cides. pressed a preference on the site, ureas. In response to questions. Mr. Tru- Texas reports Included: man added that the selection of Adrian. .B5 Inches; Clarendon, .11; it new Democratic national chiur-; Mulcshoc. ,41: Panhandle, .20; the event Robert E. Han-; Stratford, ,77, and Darrouzctt, .71. negan steps ixlso a matter; The same spotted showers visited fo'r the Democratic National Com- the New Mexico line region and the -Oklahoma Panhandle. Buffalo. Okl.a.. had 1.87 Inches; Guymon, .11, and Anti-Communist Leaders Reported Fleeing Hungary IBoisc City, .14, j .04. Clayton. NM, i ported .04, with Clovls receiving 'and Tucumraci .40 inches ,37 Lne country wun a iuuuw leidcr Bel" Halter. The two. boh-J maximum nf parliament, have been' lhc las> critics of Huncnry's Com- munist-dciminntcd government. CHAJILKTOK CHINA LAMPS  E. and Rob- ert F. pevin directs thc D. O. program every child entering thc public schools must be vaccinated against smallpox unless thc child has had smallpox. Children en- tering school here for thc first time, cither in thc first grade or coming from other schools, must present a certificate from a li- censed physician showing that they have had a successful vac- cination. Mr. Rogers says that last spring parents were advised to have medi- cal examination by their family are on thc same standards and the same qualifications of teacn- ers apply in all schools. This that as good work can be done in one school as in another. Superin- tendent Rogers says. Amarillo College opens its at 3 o'clock Monday mornlnt. Sept. 15. At this time all mcn will assemble in the audi- torium for announcement plans. Following this, they are to take psychological and Interest exams. Program for the afternoon of the lie iroRi-am. leal examination ay uiuj. will include a silent read- Children entering Amarillo pub-j physicians for all 6-year-old aptitude test and c schools for the first time in; aren' for the Hrst time. II and ciuicai_ ha.ve not they should' Jit grades one, two or three will be __ _... required to present a birth certif- examinations. icate, Supt. Chas. M. Rogers has them before the opening of announced. This includes all 6-year- j Although {or old children entering school lor the, js not j-equircd for ndmis- LUlU L.H--' ided tour of the college plant, purpose of the tour. Dean able At Lcmuua. .o'clock the same afternoon. ._ _ I'T'l 7 _ _ M. j 1 HC TT Cdl 14 Jews and an Arab w.ere killed to- day during conflict in the ABU Keblr area of half a square mile be- tween the twin cities of Tel Aviv and Jaffa. Some 32 others were Injured, many seriously, in fights with knives, guns, .clubs and stones fore peace and calm were enforced' on the blood splotched streets at dusk by troops bearing bayonetted AMARILLO AND VICINITY: Con- siderable cloudiness with scattered ,ier At 4 0-coc le first time and all children entering to jt is advised, Mr. womell students will meet In the the second and third grades from uadcd. Ikudirorium and men students will other school systems. i school officials urge that par- jn the gym. An thci est transfers 1'rom ...m in Student Parent; county may secure a birth cer- tificate at the City Health Depart- ment in the City Hall. Failure to thciellts do ass not request transfers hool district to another ex-iBl) cept in cases of emergency or ab- solute necessity. Because of "wlif be the Student Buildinil from to local showers this afternoon and tonight. Friday partly cloudy. Con- tinued mild temperatures. WEST TEXAS: Partly cloudy with I.V i u.j- is scftttered afternoon and early] thundershowers this al'ter- County V-J Day celebration at "Jnd ,tonight. Thundershowers Monahans. The event honors Ward except in Panhandle. Little rinnntw vpternns. a.nrf includes speak at the second County t'emperature- MEXICO: Partly cloudy to- fiddlers contest. land even "evenHs' the largest in yet and will be at- UUOA uy t-t wfjo vvww TQitrif-fl o nn The erupted .suddenly American Le- at morning, and j p afr Stephenville plans an continued .until the curfew, .all-day program. .Business .houses Seven of'the-injured were Arabs, wln DJ typo in critical condition; 14 other Arabs were hurt less seriously. Thc other 11 were Jews, nit of whom escaped parade, carnival, barbecue, air show, baseball' games, dances, "afternoon beauty_ contests and, an old time thunderstorms and lowers: High for 24 hours ending at AM, 91 degrees; low, 64 degrees; noon, 80 degrees. Precipitation: .08 inch. MRS. WINE HEADS WCTU Ind., Aug. 14 Elkhart County Woman's Christian Temperance Union chose the cnn- rilrinte Instead of the nnmc. yest.cr- tended by residents from Barstow, Orandfalls, Royalty, Pyote, and Wickett. will be closed. Noely-ci mm h 111 nniv "Hcttth, Auto Lonna, 821 West. 8th SI. Tucsday morning. Sept. 16. will meet iri t..ie do "this will necessitate delay in j creased enrollment and crowded at 9 o'clock. Those who did registering the children. [conditions in many schools, it will t.ajje psychological exarmna- of thc Board of i be necessary to reject requests for ition ]ast year will be given-it Tues- School Trustees also require that 'transfer where classes arc filled aiternoon and freshmen wiU M i take thc science aptitude test at the time. Individual counseling for students is scheduled for Sept. 16 and 17 Students will be assigned to advisers, who will help them iplan a college program. Thc first general assembly is to be Sept. 17, and all students are required to at- Loiid. Dean Davis said. Official rcpistmtion begins Sept. 18 and Ifl. Faculty advisers will have results of thc examinations by this time and will be able direct the students' programs. Glasswbrk begins ScpU 22- Purpose of the guidance program .....week is to help the adjust- himself to col- Licenses at Stake For Speedy Drivers _i luri-iimit 'T Worn' C The clamps are set. Speeders are going to be cnught. Mayor.' Lawrence Hagy said bad driving is stop. If lack of public cooperation in promoting ment of more traffic officers they they [will be added to the police force iptirjiic coopti ILUIOII in iJi uiiiui.iiifa Reckless drivers and bad drivers are safety forces the employ- going to be caught, Traffic officers today said are clamping down. Those who ig-jthe mayor said, nore traffic regulation sooner or! Today there was a later will find themselves being ference in the forced to the curb by.n police siren. Each time a violator gets caught the fine will be heavier. Police Traffic Cn.pt. Garlic Price said' four violations will be rnouch tnere was a nouceauie purpose 01 th ference in the activities of tlle men. Motorcycle patrolmen are] student ad more alert and are covering more lif D dav re-eiec'Ung Wine as to, start proceedinKs to have the Corpora tier president. violator's driver's license suspended.Ush violators. territory. Other policemen are keep- ing their eyes open for traffic vio- Corporation court is open to ptui- ._ lege life, Dean Davis explains. whole progrnm is a definite port ot thp semester. Repistrntion at Amarillo Center See SCHOOLS Face   

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