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Amarillo Globe Times Newspaper Archive: December 4, 1961 - Page 1

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Publication: Amarillo Globe Times

Location: Amarillo, Texas

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   Amarillo Globe-Times (Newspaper) - December 4, 1961, Amarillo, Texas                              -US ARMY CHiCKPOIMT CHARUt Press. Wlrenhoto American infantrymen in battle dress guarded a sandbagged point with bazooka and automatic, weapons at the West Berlin side of the Friedrichstrasse check- point today. The GIs dug in as Communists moved in troops and laborers to nar- row gaps at crossing points between East and West Berlin. Reds Toil All Night Strengthening Wall SUNDAY CLOSING BE ENFORCED By JOHN FIEIIN BERLIN Working through (lie night under flood lights, East German workers seven crossing West and East Berlin today and strengthened the adjacent sections of the Berlin wall with more concrete. narrowed the points between German people's army, also in battle dress with machine guns. The British increased their pa- trol on their short stretch of bor- der near Hie Brandenburg Gate, and French officers were reported observing the activity along the border of their sector. terior Ministry added that it was East Germany's reply to U.S. troop movements on the 100-mile autobahn linking West Berlin with the free world. Maj. Gen. Albert Watson II, the U.S. commandant in West Berlin, rushed.a written protest to his So- Car Firm Reports Mix-up By BRUCE ROMIG Staff Writer Texas' new weekend clos- ing laws will be enforced in Ansarillo, Potter County Atty. Naomi Harney said .Iiis morning. She laid down (lie policy after! (lie city's first incident of Blu Law enforcement since the statute took effect last month. Police put the clamp on a used car dealership after receiving complaints Sunday morning. Today, an employe of the usec car firm said doors were openec on Sunday only because County Atty. Harney had given her ap proval. Employes of McCracken Moloi Co., 1212 W. 6th, said they were under the impression that th new law was not being enfovcec They opened then lot for business Sunday at 10 a.m Complaints were received by the Amarillo Police Department and at p.m. the car lot wa. closed to business. Officials of the company sail the decision lo open was basec on 'a letter from the company' attorney, James R. Collins. Collins caid he called the coun ty attorney Thursday lo inquin whether the motor company couli close on Saturday and then re Final Edition AMARILLO GLOBE-TIMES Sttth Year, 199 10 Cents 30 1'ages AmarUIn, Texas. Monday. I, 1961 Tha U.S. command rushed upj about seven feet high and five feet a platoon of 30 battle-dressed thick. Tank barriers of steel The formidable new walls were viet counterpart, Col. Andrei I.jmain open aU Suuday. Solovyev. According to Collins. Mrs. Hai Watson called the new told him that no action wouli anlrymen as a show of force itlhedgehogs were cemenlcd into action an illegal viola-jbe taken if the firm remainei the Friedrichstrasse checkpoint in ground. I lion of the four-power occupation open both days. The firm wa; the American sector, the crossing designated by tho Communists for Allied personnel and other for- eigners. With a bazooka and two ma- guns set up behind sand- bags, the American soldiers faced several hundred men of the cast Berlin and de- Only small passages for on about eight feet wide for vehiclesimanded Soviet assurances tha there would be no interference with Allied and civilian traffic be _........._. tween thpAU.S. sector and Eas strengthening'the wall to Berlin. Watson called the Eas German explanation "an obviouslj (See 2) and two to Ihrce feet for pedes- trians, were left open. The East Germans said they were protect East Berlin from any ill-; advised Western aclion. The In-i Planes of U.N. Facing Threat tanga Foreigi Kimba moved llp ened today to shoot down v N troops moved up three all U.N. planes flying overjarmored cars to face them. this secessionist province] At an abandoned military sup- to govern its operations accord ingly until such time as she an ndunced a change of policy through the press and other new media. Collins said he under stood. Tills morning Mrs. Harney said "In the future, any complaints re ceived by the Potler Comity At torney's office will be accepted.' Law enforcement officials of the Amarillo Police Department anci Potter County Sheriff's Office had ireviously agreed that sufficient ime should be given merchants o adjust lo the recently enacted egislature, said Mrs. Harney. "I feel that the merchants have jnow had sufficient time in which to comply with the law and any complaints are presented to this office they will be accepted." Asst. Chief of Police Claude B. Evans said Sunday that tire Blue Laws have been treated in Ama- rillo in a manner similar to any new traffic law. The public is Tension "befween Katangans i .a chance lo adiust lo lhem. ply depot in Elisabethville para- troopers dug in and took up de- Katanga troops fol- 1 lowed up the declaration by throwing up roadblocks on main roads leading to airport and the U.N. Indian FRIEND troop camp. and U.N. troops is at flashpoint. In a communique Sunday night (See 2) Kimba's threat was termed a "very grave statement'1 by acting U.N. Chief George Ivan Smith, who reported it at once to U.N. Headquarters in New York. Katanga troops killed one U.N. soldier, wounded three and seized 15 as hostages during the week- end. PRIZE Report on Death of Pets Wins Larry Don Martin. -110 N. Ken- tucky, is awarded first place in the weekly neWstip contest coiv ducted by the Globe-News Pub' lishing Co. He will receive a check for for reporting the sec- ond foray .on the pels of J. J. Cate, 406 N. Kentucky. His tin kept the story "alive" and in- directly led to the capture of the culprit (a dog) by n staff reporter and an Animal Control official. A wayward i.-nnsporl Iruck re- sulted in a tip from Mrs. Elbcrt Rogers, 3102 Vcrnon, 'and she will receive n check for .fH.as second place award. Mrs. Rogers re- ported that the truck disappeared from a parking In Pnmpa on Monday night of last week. It later was found with its "bor- check, for ?2 will ho for- WHrded to Mrs. Roy L. Voting, )tll' N. Hughes, for being tint with information that jni Injured terlmnly when utruck car !n the 1100 block of N. i en Saturday afternoon. jam; Slant, he said. "The firm (McCracken Motor) was aware of the law, but was under the impression the law .was not being said Evans. No charges arc being brought 'against the firm. When police sug- jgested McCrackcu close Sunday Student Dies As Car Flips DONALD LEE TAYLOR Donald Lee Taylor, 19, son of L. Taylor of Amarillo, died about 11 p.m. Sunday, an hour after he was injured ir. a one-car accident 2.1 miles north of Abilene on U.S. Highway 83. Suffering injuries in (he accident and hospitalized at Hendrick Me- morial Hospital, Abilene, was Jer- ry Shackelford, 19, son of Dr. and Mrs. Foy W. Shackelford, 2117 Hughes. Dr. Shackelford, Amarillo dent- ist, and Taylor, owner of V. L. Taylor Co. furniture stores here, flew lo Abilene Sunday night upon being notified of the accident. Both of the young men were sophomore students at Abilene Christian College. They had been visiting in Amarillo during the weekend and left here about 4 p.m Sunday on their return trip to (Sec J) Recommended Heading Inside Today's Globe-Times GRAIN DEALERS Mil Page 3. KENNEDY REMAINS popular, Gallup reports-Page 4. MEANY AND Rcnlher exchange verbal Page 7. REDSKINS PICK Ernie in NFL druft-Panc 8. WALKER SAYS he'll work ilone in n. AWOL 01 three mere 14. SKCRKVARY RUSK IffMrn MCial PROBLEM or (Hulwten irawi irnm wrtow-p.w H. PRK-CHRISTMAS MMmnmnta tt. afternoon, salesmen were Evans said "most The new Blue Laws passed by the Texas Legislature became ef- fective Nov. 6. Since that time no complaints had been filed with either county or city law en- forcement officials until Sunday. Chief of Police Wiley Alexander and Potter County Sheriff Jim Line said today ihat any com- plaint received by their offices, would be investigated Formal] prosecution romnlaints'wiild supervision of the in Helium Production Tops Demand EXELL HELIUM PLANT, Dec. the first time in history, helium produc- tion is exceeding demand, Henry P. Wheeler, assistant director for helium in the U.S. Bureau of Mines, toid three visiting congressmen here this morning. Wheeler came from his office in Washington, D.C.. to assist in briefing" three members of the House mines and mining subcom- mittee of the Committee on In- terior and Insular Affairs. Tlie congressmen arc Walter Rogcrs of Pampa. J. Edgar Cheno- weth of Trinidad. Colo., and Ed Edmondson of Muskogee, Okla.. subcommittee chairman. I The briefing was directed by Paul V. Mullins of Amarillo. gen- eral manager for helium opera- tions, i While noting that helium supply now exceeds demand. Wheeler said the U.S. must find more hel- ium sources by 1985 or cut down on. some uses. The helium con- servation program now under way will only meet requirements to 1985. he said. -stuff photo by BtLLy FORBES Also atteiidins (he briefins Was U.S. Rep. Walter Rogers, center, gazes intently at a liquid air demonstration Milton A. Pearl or Washington. staged for visiting congressmen this morning at Exell Helium Plant north of Am- D.C.. staff consultant to the com- arillo. Rogers, from Pompa, visited the plan! with Rep. J. Edgar Chenowcth, mittee. right, of Trinidad. Colo., and Rep. Ed Edmondson of Muskogee, Okla. The dem- onslration was presented by C. G. Kirkland of Amarillo, chief of the laboratory After the briefing, the three series branch at the Helium Research Center here. congressmen toured (he Exell __________________________________________________________________________________ plant. Having concelled earlier Inlans to visit the helium plant at Laos Peace Pact Signed 111 Canada j Kc-yes. Okla.. the visitors tenta- I lively planned a sloo this after- I noon at the Helium Research Cen- i tor at Armirillo Helium Plant west of Amarillo. The Exell plant, built in 1032. is the largest government-owned hel- iium plant in operation. GENEVA, Dec. 4 Western powers and Soviet bloc concluded a far-reaching agreement today on how to maintain the peace and neutrality of Laos. I decision's" The six-point agreement was adopted at a closedjternationa] Control Commission! session of the 14-nation Laos peace conference. It will'UCCi for Laos. The commission.! .....J-up of Canada, India and Rogers To iccome operative when the neutrality treaty now being imatle! Hvnf f din j lull-I, 1. drafted by (he conference is Some important obstacles remain to be overcome, par-'irai'ity' icularly the integration of, he hostile Laotian military for areas of friction." at Luncheon Guest speaker at a public The agreement .stipulates that i luncheon to be held Wednesday formal recommendations of in the Herring Hotel Crys- Tbe agreement, reached in long commission can only be made Ballroom will be Rep. Walter orces. But today's agree marked tantial. step forward permanent snai-mans ui can be approved by majority In his talk before the group aken by the conference! Laotian neutrality. voles. Rogers will .discuss congressional ,nd was hailed by Western agreement will allow legislation, past and future, of in- nd Communist' delegates i Brilish a.ntl Soviel (ieleEalcs; Franco to majmajn a limited mipteresl lo Amarillo area citizens. Only 300 persons can be ac- l mnef 5. jf bargaining, names .unanimous vote, but situation re-'Rogers of Pampa and t) c and the Soviet Union and other minor decisions1 Congressional District. rward permanent guardians of can approved by majority In his talk before the Red dims Han-Fu mi- iare the co-chairmen of the detachment and some mili-: month-old conference. Under thcilal.y advisers in Laos afler new agreement, their stalulc is adopted. wishing to attend may make commodated for the luncheon and cgi (See 2> Condition of Blast Victim Is 'Serious' By GKNE SIIEtTON SlaH Writer A IcAse conneclion on a bath- room healer Ibis morning trig, gored an explosion that seriously burned a 42-year-old Amarillo oman. Mrs. Clinton G. (Lucille) Lynch was listed in serious condition by authorities at St. Anthony's Hos- pital at noon today. .She sufferer! second anil ililid degree burns about the face, neck, shoulders al control commission of Canada and Poland. The western powers want all: regular forces in Laos placed Comic Ihctumary COMPLIMENT form of flattery which women under tho Royal Laotian Army; often utter and sometimes mean.1 command, wliich is wcstcrn-i n-; fluenccd. Thj WCSt also wants j Tk-% 1 I the commission lo supervise ATTORNEY GENERAL disbanding of Ibe Communist Pathet Lao's jungle guerrillas. three rival politicarCommittee of the chamber. princes still have to work out. Also appearing on the program The princes-neutralist Souvan- na Phouma. pro-western n :0um and pro-Communist BaUeima (See 21 Laura Urdapillcta, First Dancer George jCano and Director Felipe Segura. They are scheduled to appear i here Thursday night in Municipal 1 Auditorium. "All of us highly vnluc f h c agreement alreatlv reached (and1 sincerely hope that the progressive have made here will have a bene- ficial influence on Hie situation in t.nos." Chang said. But he declared that the wes- tern demand, for military integra- tion had created "a new obstacle in our conference." "The Americans themselves well James Is In Race AUSTIN (AP) Rep. Tom James' announcement said. "The know that such on absurd of Dallas said today he.definite lines arc already drawn THE WEATHKK osilion would only bo spurned AND TV kyi M N. A Look at TMfdny DRAFT CHIEF MM b lltHlliiiil he blast occurred at the fam- ily home, a gray asphalt tile House located al the rear of 806 Polk. Fire department officials the- orized that a connection on the gas jet. supplying a bathroom heal- er was loose "and just hanging Gas escaping from the con- nection filled the bathroom and pcd through the attic of (he three-room home. A (lame under a hot water hoat- er torched off the Must shortly 10 sending tiro Into (In t) th. socialist (CotTimunisI countries under n o1 circumstances consent fo such a suggestion of "larlnf iit (he internal affairs of Chans said. U.S. delegate Willlnm H. Sulli- van told the conference "tho oat- tern that Is emerging for agree- ment on Laos is n pattern tor neane not, nriv In linos, not only in SmtfhPfisl Asto. but fhroucliouf the wirjd which gives how lhat there can ncaccfut set- tlement of differences in ma- AMARILLO AND VICINITY: Partly c'oudy this ai'crnooii and fonioril rhrouofi Tuesday. Possibly o little verv liahl or rain forlv Tues- day. Hioti lodoy 58; Tuesday 43. TEXAS: cloufl'ncss and cooler 1 o do v Scattered showers moiHv and soulfi oortiom. Portly cloudy ond lonlfiht ond Tucidov. Hiohs to- day SI nor'h to if lows tonlofit 30 norm to 30 NORTHERN NEW MEXICO: Portly cloudy moi) today. A Icfil t Crest gl'OUpS Who now OOrmnmCi Bowers ond occoiionol mow In moun- tolni, mainly In the south- ond will ho a candidate for attorney .because of my record of consist., general. 'ently exposins and fighting aware my candidacy will ixcd crime, the professional poli-10uthMsl; ;ed by powerful and their politic-al ns well :us the special in wnDTWI MAD f1 J'iiuos WHS T mcniljcr of Itic1 House Investigating ConMllitteeiwannef most Tutiddv. Hlohi W Ihnl conducted vice probes FOR .NORTH. Beaumont and Port TEXAS: win TWl ll tlmt'lhur. nine normal. wheni The. only other nnnminccd (litrt ii is Tom Rravlcy, onTuexiav wim only miwf f of stale. Former Carr. who HrtiM ona .u ,t, inKainw Ally. Will Wilson ma, 'dale'. I SunlUt HT, J i   

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