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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - December 31, 1974, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT -194_PHgNE 6734271. ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, TUESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 31, 1974 -TWENTY-SIX PACKS IN THREE Price 15 Cents Astociatid Prttt (Pi Famous Poets Penned Some By PHIL H. SHOOK Reporter-News Stair Writer Glitters, glis'teneth, or glisters? That is (he question. Investors taking the plunge in (lie U. S. gold market, which opens Tuesday'' for the first time' in 4i years, may find some sound financial advice in early literature. Dryden, little known as an investment counselor, wcole "All, as' they say, that glitters .is not gold.1' in "House of Chaucer mole "Hyt is riot al golde that glareth." Other words of wisdom for the pnidenf gold investor in- Yore and Timely 0' Gold (iold all is not that doth golden seem t'aierie Q'ueene All that glisters not gold; Often have you heard that told: Many a man -his life hath sold. T But inv outside to Be- hold Merchant of Venice. Finally, in case today's geld buyers slill'dibn't get the message, W. S. Gilbert Pinafore "Things are seldom what they seem Skim milk, masquerades as cream." Mtrt Pg. even- thvng which schyiieth as the gold Nis nat gold, as that I' have nerd it told Canterbury tales Not-1 all that tempts-your wandering eves And Heedless hearts is lawful prize, Nor all thai glisters gold. Ode on a Favorite All. Is not golde. that outward shewith bright Lydgate-On the Mutability of Human Ford Vetoes Oil Import, Mining Measures VAIL, Colo. (APj Ptesi- dent' Ford vetoed 'the contro- versial strip mining and ship cargo: preference: bills .Mon- day, have effects on the nation's economy and interna- tional interests. He! gave his approval. to a. billion foreign aid mea- sure, but expressed his unhap- piriess over several restric- tions he said "may pose'se- vere problems to our and arbitr'arily bind-the.; United States in its .dealings with foreign countries. Ford took action on a total of five measures, among 115 still wailing his action after passage by Hie 93rd Congress in its final days. The Preside nt. had.an- nounced previously that lie would veto, the -strip mining bill that would impose envi- ronmental controls on surface' coal mining. velo1 of the Energy Transportation se- curity Act that would have re- quired transportation of a per- centage of imported oil on U.S. commercial ships, came as a surprise. Action on the two bills was taken by pocket veto, by which a President takes no ac- tion on a bill that has reached a signing deadline while Con- gress is.no! in session. Fowl said the tanker bill "would have the most serious consequences. It would have an adverse impact on the U.S. economy and on our foreign relations." He said "it would se- rious inflationary pressures by increasing the cost of oil and raising the prices of all prod-- nets and services which de- pend on The bill initially would re- quire thai 20 per cent of the See FORD, Col. 1, back page this section PAGE (I ONE BY KATHARYNI DUFF V George Christian, Austin public relations executive, for- mer press secretary to Texas (iovs. Price Daniel and John Connally and to President Lyndon B. wrote a Sunday piece, for the Dallas Times Herald reviewing events of 1974. George began by emoting the reply Abbe Sieyes gave ivhen asked what he did during the French Revocation. "I he said. So Americans may sum up 1W4, George.suggesfs. Wejsurviyed in accomplishment To say 1974 was the worst of years would be to ignore a lot o( history, to put aside (lit Civil Flu Epidemic, 1950; 1931, 1932, 1933, Pearl the Battle .of (tie Bulge and other dismal times. To say.it was the best of years vftuld be an exercise in TieoAVilbur Milu'sm. This was the year of the soiir taste. A blah year it was. Evil Knievcl. might be a proper symbol for 1974. Some people are much, much richer at the end of than they were at its begin- ning. More people are poorer. The price of sugar went tha- taway. The price of beef on the hoof went thataway the other direction. But the price of ground round held steady There was that constancy io cling to, the constancy of food prices. The news look strange and unexpected turns during 1974. There was the weird story ot Patty Hearst. There was the weird story of the convicts es- caped from a Colorado jail who. terrorized West Texas one week end. There was the Huntsville prison story. And for weird news, remem- ber the Texas Constitutional Convention? For six months 'or the Texas Legislature sal as a convention rewriting state's charter, spending several millions o! our dollars in the process. And then, blah! nothing. And nobody seemed to care. It was not a good year for heroes. True, the name "Ja- worski" became a symbol for quiet integrity. Texans could' take pride in Cong. Barbara Jordan. And Hank Aaron did hit the extra homers. But, lo, the mighty who have fallen! All of these and then along came Kanne Foxe. It was a year in which West had one of their driest dry spells and heaviest rain- falls so as to qualify for both droutfi and flood relief within a few weeks time. And toward the end of the year came a sports story twhich fit exactly into 1974. >Southwest Conference coach- those revered leaders ol young men, molders ot char- acter, seemed to agree they'd tetter submit to lie-detector tests on recruiting. What a year. But we and oiir system survived. And now begins 1975. Welcome to it. Weather Diagnosis: Bad Case of Drizzles Abilene and the Big Country have a severe case of the driz- zles, and forecasters see very little relief in sight for New Year's Eve and New Year's Day activities. The malady's cause, accord- ing to weathermen, is a near- ly stationary frontal system near, a Loiigview-Austin-Jun- clion-Martu line. The same sickly conditions of light rain, drizzle and fog were reported at almost every station .north, and south ol the system. Weathermen said the rain and- mist would begin slacken- ing Tuesday, but a relapse was foreseen Wednesday or Thursday as a new system -makes iis way into the state. Abilenc's symptoms, Monday include .11 inches of rain and a higli temperature ill the mid-40s. The conditions also caused a rash of accidents. Fourteen minor wrecks were reported to police between midnight Sunday and S p.m. Holiday. The prognosis for Tuesday is for a high near 40, wilh possible freezing rain or more drizzle during the night. The probability, of precipitation ii 7D per cent Tuesday decreas- ing lo 30 per cent Tuesday night. A deepening gloom of fog, misl and gray clouds covered, nearly all of the state. Freez- ing misl, sleet and snow gripped 80 per cent of Panhandle. The National Weather Serv- ice issued a travelers advisory for the northern half of the Panhandle where the service said roads and highways were icing over. Overpasses and bridges began glazing -over Monday afternoon and weath- ermen said falling''tempera- tures would make driving bay- ardous over the entire area by nightfall. Temperatures were predicted to: fall into the low: 50s by early Tuesday. 'Lkkety-splii1 Kell> Clifton, 8; of Lubbock, expresses concentration as she goes about a front sole circle drop glide on the low bar ot the uneven parallel liars during a lecent piactice session of gymnastics: Kelly is the -daughter of Mr. and JIrs, Albert Clifton of Liibbocfc (AP 2-Day total Municipal Airport .11 Total for Year 33.28 Normal for Year 23.55 AVOCA .45 .45 KAIRD .10 .41 .43 Rev. J. Lloyd Moyhew Named To St. Paul Church's Staff THE REV. MAYHEW St. ptst THE REV. CHARLES WHITTLE First Metbsdist Jury Deliberates For Five Hours The Rev J Llojd Mavhew, 62, pastor of the First United Methodist Ctarch here tor five and a half mil become minister of eiangelism and visitation at St.: Paul United Methodist Church Feb. 1. Replacing .him as pastor at: First United Methodist will-be the Rev. Charles Whittle, 47, V of Tenn., assistant: secretary for connectional ministry of (he Board of Disci- .pleship of the United Method- ist Church. lie led a-revival at First United Methodist in 1966 at.the openjng of the new sanctuary for lhat church, and was a-Denisbn-.Monre lecture- ship here in 1972.. Announcements of. -the changes. ments 'were made Monday af- ternoon by Dr: barns'Egger, Abilene district superintend- ent, and by Bishop Alsie Car- Albuquerqui. _; The Rev. Mayhew, who was named "outstanding pastor" for the Abilene district in 1971 at a ceremony at Southern Methodist University, came to First Methodist in June after four years al Levelland, four at Brownfield, six at La- mesa, four at Slaton, and pre- vious pastorales at Highland Heights .in Sweelwaler, An- drews, Ackerly, Ropesville, McCaulley and Hart, the Clyde Circuit, .and the Blair Circuit following graduation from McMurry College in 1938. He was born and grew up at Drasco (near) "1'VK NEVER .been any more thrilled than when we See PASTOR, 5, back page section PAINT NEWS INDEX Amusements 2A Astro-graph Comici 7A Dr. Lomk 2A EdU.TiiU 4A WASHINGTON (AP) The jurors in the Watergate cover- up trial began their final De- liberations Monday with 'an admonition from the trial judge to consider weeks of testimony "fearlessly, calmly and dispassionately." The nine women and three men on the panel considered the case against the five de- fendants for just under four hours before returning to their hotel. Their deliberation irr a liny chamber just off the court- room of U.S. District Court Judge John J. Sirica resumes ,'al a.m. CS'f Tuesday. ;The five defendants, three of wherin-ere close, aides to for- mer President' Richard M. Nixon, are accused of conspir- ing to obstruct (he investiga- tion into the 1972 break-in al Democratic National Commit- tee headquarters. The grand jury lhat returned the cover- up indictment named Nixon as an co-conspirator. In his inslruclions, Sirica warned the jurors against con- sidering anything but evidence heard in the courtroom. "Neither the pardon of for- mer President Nixon. nor any other cases or extraneous matters should have any ef- fect on your deliberations or your Sirica said. Before quitting for the day, the jury requested all of the trial testimony ot defendant John Mitchell, the former attorney general's April 20, 1973, grand jury, testimony, plus the (rial testimony of three key prosecution witness- es, Fred C. Stuart Magruder, and former White counsel John: W, Dean -Sirica turned .down" the re- quest, 'It would be impossible. We would be See JURORS, OH. 1, back page (Ms -t8C Oil ____ 1.2C Sylvit Porttr 71 in Hfetorr IA TV IOC TV Sc.ut IOC 31 JUDGE SIRICA INSTRUCTS TIIK JURY in Watergate covi-r-up (rial .Monday in Washington .IN'otice-iNew Carrier Rates for Your Keporler-News Urcausf of roiiliiiued liarp increases in the price of newsprint, ink anil firry malcriil tint into niikine llu? jht lir'l rrgional newspaper .in lite suif, we forced (o nhc. our home. Jcliiery prices to per ninnlh iiiil lo 35e on copir? of ilay edition fffeclive January i, 1975, Vnvir c.irrifr and jgcnl nharn in incrrase. Think )nii tor yom and See Your Agent   

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