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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - December 19, 1974, Abilene, Texas                               av; H i "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO fRlENDS-OR FOES WE.SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 94TH YEAR, NO. 183 PHONE 6734271 ABILENE, TEX., 79604, THURSDAY MORNING, DEC. 19, 1974 FORTY-FOUR PAGES IN FOUR SECTIONS Price 15 Cents Auocbitd Prat Man's Journey to Visit Sick Son Has Tragic Ending 'WEATIIERFORD A 74- car-old Abilene man died Wednesday after being taken ill in a highway patrol car near Weatherford where he had been stopped for speeding on Hie way to visit a swk son in Fort Worth. Thomas B. McCoy of 3185 S 19th St. was pronounced dead at Campbell Memorial Hospi- tal in Weatherford about a m. Wednesday by a physi- cian at the-hospital. 'Justice of the Peace Chester Causbie of Weatherford 01- dered an autopsy, which was performed later Wednesday at the Dallas County Medical Ex- aminer's office. CAUSBIE said he expected a verbal report on the cause of death about noon Thursday, but no written report until next week. Sgt. F. E. Johnson, supeivi- sor of the Mineral Wells area Department of Public Safety office, gave the-following ac- count of the incident, based on the leport if the an citing of- Bill Pemck: The highway patiolman had checked the speed of McCoy's car, traveling east on 111 20, on radar at 70 miles per and had difficulty stopping the driver, even though the1 DPS car's flashing lights and siien were'on. McCoy pointed down tiie road several times when the patrol car pulled alongside, the report continued. After tlie car'was stopped, the paliol- rnan said, he told McCoy he would be issued citations fur speeding and failing to slop for an Although instructed to tollpiv. I he. patrolman to a justice'of the peace office, McCoy told the patrolman he would not do so, the account said McCoy then started a scuf- lie, during which he giabbed his driver's license and tried to grab the officci's pistol, the report said. A passerby helped subdue the man, who was then placed in tile patiolman's car in handcuffs. McCoy immediately suffeicd a scizuic and was mshcd to Campbell Memoiial Hospital, only about tvio miles away. HIS SON, 0. B. McCoy, un- deiwent bladdei smgeiy in Harris-Hospital in Fort .Worth Wednesday morning and was in satisfactory condition Wednesday night, a hospital spokesman said. The drivci was first' ap pi cached by the patiol cai in the west pait ot Weatheiford and finally stopped just west of State Highway 121 inler'scc- tion on :Interstate' 'two miles !eas'l of the radar site. Funeral arrangements', are pending at Elliott Hainil Fu neral Home in Abilene. Born March 4, 1900, in .Tay- lor Courily, Mr. McCoy was a farmer and longtime employe of an Abilene constiuclion; companv He maiued Loia Estle Self in 1917 in Jones County, and they moved to Abilene'In'UW. His wife died in 191G Mr. McCoy was a member of the Church- of ihe: Itearene and Abilene Masonic Lodge No. 559. S u i' v i v o r s include three sons, 0. B. of Fort Worth, Lloyd 0. of 1458 Ross'and Roy L." of 5218 llarwoorl; two sis- lers, Mrs. Pearl Gilbert ot Ab- ilene and'Mis RhocU Mom- son (ot Whiltici, Calif, (our giandchildren'and two great- grandchildren PAGE ONE BY KATHARYN DUFF The Christmas season has; come to be June-like, or so it appears from the number of scheduled the next 10 days. among the house- holds involved now in prepara- tions for such an event that the Alvm Mclaughlins, 3325 Edgemont. The McLonghlins' daughter, Brands Sue, is to be married Saturday in First Baptist Church chapel at Corpus Chnsli, family's former hometown. She will wed John Creswell Martin who is m graduate school at Texas AiM. It will be wedding and you know how much prep- aration that calls for, particu- larly when it is long-dis- tance, AbilenWo-Corpus. The preparations hive, In fact, prompted Alvin, who works here at the paper, to begin handing out cards. His cards read: "I am the Father of the Bride. "Nobody's paying, much at- tention to me today, but I can assure you that I ?m getting my share of notice. The banks and seyeral business firms are watching me very closely." A friend at Temple named Carol has four kin- dergarten age to nol-quite- old-enough-to-drive.- She has two aged relatives who live in different parts of the same town arid look to her for atten- tion She has a husband who is a busy doctor. This: sort of adds up to a whole'lot of errands and taxi service so that Carol can put 390 miles on her car in a w eek and never leave the 'city limits. It was, therefore, interest- ing, the happy, exultant note in her Chrislmas card. "I'm so excited over what John (husband) is giving me for she wrole. "He has prom'scd to give me an eight day vTcek for 52 straight weeks." t Manuel Estjulvel, cuslodian al Winters Elementary School, his son, Manic, 6, and niece, Patricia Waller, age 7, talking about Santa's arrnal at a Thornton's park- Ing lot in Abilene via helicop- ter. "Why would Sanla come m on a helicopter when he has a sleigh and Patricia wondered. "Because .Sanla isn't Manie replied. "What does lhat mean'" Patricia asked. "Well, it's deer season Manie explained, an explanation whose' logic you beat. Shedding light for chanty, Eha Eheff, an 80-yeai old Galena, 111, beekeeper, is framed by candles he pio- duces for chauly. Elieif has contributed 15 to the March of Dimes, his favor- ite chanty, from 15 years of making honey and beeswax candles. (AP Whephoto) Row Materials Cost Less, But So What? By LOUISE COOK 1 Associated Press Writer Raw materials'used in ev- er) thing from automobiles to carpets are beginning to dec line in cost, .but the decreases won't reach bujers of the fin- ished products for some time -if at all. An Associated Press survey showed that prices for things t such as chemicals, lumber, some'meials, rubber and cot- ton have dropped from record levels reached earlier this year. "For example: raw cotton prices down as much as 50 per cent; certain lumber down 63 per cent since July; copper prices off 56 per cent. Two exceptions are coal and steel Coal prices are expected lo increase as a result of the miners' strike, and U.S. Slccl announced on Monday an 8 per cent increase on two thirds of its pioduct line affecting the construction, i ail and oil industries. President Ford has demanded juslifica- tion for the boost. "Prices are leveling off, but at extremely high said a spokesman for the Car- borundum Co., at Niagara Falls, N.Y., which manufac- turers abrasives for use in factories. As-an example of the dec- spokesman cited raw ;_ cotton prices which have diopped from 90 cents a pound eaiher this jeai lo 45 cents a pound. The main reason for the decline is inventory buildup Companies a m a s s e d large stockpiles of a wide variety of products, tearing shortages or soaring prices. The shortages never materialize.; inflation caused people to spend .less; manufacturers of consumer goods leduced their mders of raw materials, and the produ: ccrs ot.these materials found themselves with, a was much grealci than (he de- mand. The Commerce Depart- ment said Monday that busi- ness, inventories n October rose billion the larg- est monthly increase this j ear. About 8 billion ot (he increase was in retail automo- bile inventones reflecting sag- ging auto sales r Thomas Muiphy, chanman Motors, 'said that the company's index of raw materials used in automobiles had finally leveled off A Ford Motor Co. spokes- man said, "After piice con- trols weie removed, puces shot up drastically lo catch up. Prices now seem to have leveled 'off prices haven't, gone since puce controls uent off in May." Texas Now No. 3 WASHINGTON is now the third largest state in population, the Census Buieau has announced. Ihe huieau said the stale's population push- ed past the 12 million mark this year. As of July persons were repented living in Texas, an increase of since July 1, 1973. The new figures place Texas ahead of Penn- sylvania In the 1970 census, Texas population iccoicted as placing the state in fourth, above Illinois. The only slates with laiger populations now aie Cahloinin, with 209 million persons, and New Yoik, with 18 1 million peisons. Soviets Reject Trade Bill Accord B) GEORGP. KRIMSKY Associated Press Writer MOSCOW (AP) The Kremlin h.is "flatly rejected as unacceptable" the new U S trade bill tied to emigration of Jews, and other .minorities fiom Communist countiies, Tass said Wednesday. Tass also quolcd the Kiem 1m as saying theie actually may IK fewer peisons leaving the Slafc Department officials and souices on Capitol Hill played dcmn the sciwusness of the Soviet, leport. Sen Hemy M.' Jackson, D-Wash helped negotiate an agicement wilti the Fold administration on the emigra- tion issue that broke an im- passe holding up final action un the liade bill, said he con- siders the Tass statement "piobably m the face-saving calegory He urged Congiess lo com- plete final action on the bill and called on the administra- tion to provide its imeipietd- lion of a lettei fiom Soviet Foieign Minister Andrei Gro to Secret 
                            

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