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Abilene Reporter News: Monday, November 11, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - November 11, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES-WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 94TH YEAR, NO: 146 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 11, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Price 15 Cenls 'Associated Press (JPj Baby's Formula A Taxable Item? Q. Is baby formula a taxable Hem or not? IVe purchased our son's for- mula from different stores here anrt one supermarket consistently charged tax on it and had it listed as a drug Hem. I thought baby .formula was a necessary food for Infants and there- fore non-taxahle like baby food. We paid a lot of money out on taxes at this particular store. A It's not taxable, says Carlton Bell al Texas State Comptroller's Office, and it's not a drug item. Al a grocery store a drug item would refer to aspirin, vitamins and1 .such, which would be taxable, though pre- scription, drugs are not. Bell suggests you talk with the store manager. He may be willing to refund your tax if you can furnish receipts. Any- time anybody suspects he has been incor- rectly charged sales Bell would an-, predate hearing about it. He'll contact the manager and "usually it's no problem; he'll correct it immediately." From the grocer's point of view, Hell says checkers have quite a lime keeping up willi what's taxable and what isn't, especially new checkers. A store can't Veep money charged you as tax anyway so it's not a money-making scheme for the store. Q. A highly Intellectual reader (me) Is wondering If Abilene has Mensa chapter. In a news story abont the pro- motion of a postal employe I noted he was a member of Mcnsa and the Klwanls Club (a strange Can you fill me in? A. JI-SU's Dr. I.loyd Huff, who Is active- ly involved in the local Mensa Society, will be glad lo hear from you. The one qualification for membership is a score on nn IQ lest higher than 98 per cent of the general population. Mensa's goal is lo re- cruit people who are able to think lor themselves. The organization then pro- vides members with access to other good minds and a receptive but critical audi- ence to try out'hew. And hey! The Kiwanis Club is not going to appreciate your inference. Some of those guys are highly intellectual types. Our editor (ahem) is one. Q. Hosv does a person flash- light batteries so they won't go Hat? I always buy a spare and by the time I'm ready for It, It's gone kaput. Once 1 read something about freezing Ihem or maybe jt said (o heat Ihem, any- way I don't remember which. A. Dedicated penny-pinchers rejuvenate old batteries to get a few more "miles" by heating them upside down in Ihc oven. To increase shelf Me of a new one, store il in a cool place. Q. When does the telephone company plan on installing TSPS here? A. It will he at least three years and maybe longer, says Southwestern Bell Dis- trict Manager Mike Witt. He explained it takes two or three years to order equip- ,ment, engineer it and install it once ap- proved by company headquarters and it hasn't even been approved yet. TSPS stands for Traffic Service Positions Switchboard and what that means is you can make a credit card, person to person or collect call all by yourself by simply dialing 0, then the area code, then the number. The operator conies on the line automat- ically only to lake billing information, then you complete the.call yourself. Eight now, in Abilene, we can place only station to station calls without going through the operator but most of the larger metropoli- tan cities in the state have TSPS. Q. I have a ladder back chair (hat needs the seat re-caned. Is there any place here (hat does this work? It's not the kind that I can use a kit it's woven like an old cane-bottom chair. A. Ken Bisson docs re-caning and you can reach him at 672-2086. He thinks you mean fiber rush because most ladder backs have fiber rush seats but it doesn't really matter, lie can do both. 'Address questions lo Action Line, Box 3V, Abilene, Texas 79604. Names will lot be used but questions must be signed and addresses given. Please In- clude telephone numbers If possible. Cover-Up Mistrial Rejected WASHINGTON (AP) U.S. District Judge John J. Slricit today denied a request for a separate trial and for a mistri- al from two of the defendants in the Watergate cover-nil trial. Sirica acled just before Watergate prosecutors were scheduled lo begin playing a series of 26 White House tapes they the most important part of tlieir case. Defense lawyers had argued that the sudden appearance of the' memo' unfairly forced them lo change their strate- gics in midstream. Mcanwlule, the S u p r c rife Court declined lo hear argu- ments on whether the indict- ments of the six Watergate cover-up defendants should be invalidated. Reflective Moment Lou Wesley has an out-of-this-wbrld-Iook as he in-tlulges in some late season sunbathing at in New York. City's borough of the Bronx Saturday. (AP them Is Ihe lasl tape made public ,by Richard M. Nixon before he resigned Hie presidency. Shortly before rejecting a mistrial molion from defendant John N. Mitchell and a severance molion from defendant Kenneth W- Parkinson, Sirica agreed to anolher defense request that a word be struck from Ihc June 23, 1572, tape to be heard by the jury today. Transcripts prepared by thc special prosecutor's office showed defendant 11. Haldcman saying, "G e in reference lo Ihe code name for the plan to bug the Democrats in 1972. In place of Gcmslone and sentences bracketing it, Sirica ordered tlie word "unintelligible" typed in. The tape where others who have heard Gemslone remains intact. Lawyers for Parkinson and Mitchell had made their request to Sirica based upon the disclosure lasl week of a memo written by Watergate burglar E. Howard Hunt. The memo had been kept from the prosecutors for more Ihan a year by Hunl's first, lawyer, William 0. ruling lets stand a Court of Appeals decision which rejected a molion by II. R. Haldeman to strike down the indictments. Haldeman contended the grand jury winch returned thc indictments was not legally in existence since Congress extended ils life beyond Hie normal IS months. The 26 tapes tolal 35 lislen-ing hours and are designed lo enlighten the jury about key events in Ihe 10 months afler Ihe June, break-in. Also lo be introduced inlo evidence was a. diary of Nixon's appointments for June 23, showing that lie and Ilaldcmait met for U minutes. The June 23 tape qnoles Nixon as approving a plan lo thwart the FBI investigation of the break-in at Democratic National Commitlee headquai1-lers.. Most of Ihe oiher tapes involve conversations in April 1973 -right before two of Nixon's top assistants, Haltleman and defendant John D. Ehr-lichman, resigned and a 'tliirci, John W. Dean III, was fired. Equipme By JIM CONLEY Reporter-News Staff Writer BAKKSDALE AFB, La. Those little gremlins who are always blamed for equipment' failures must have been determined to make sure Dyess AFB's KC135 Stratotanker had a rough mission Sunday nighl. The loss of a couple of crucial navigational aids left Drops Ti plane, with -an almost impossible task. Unable to compensate accuralely for wind drift, -Ihe -D y e s s enti-y in the Strategic Air Command Bombing and Navigation Competition here came in last of all 27 tankers in thc first of its two missions. That knocked Dyess's 96lh Bomb Wing from seventh down to 17th in the standings for the Fairchild Trophy, the main, overall award of the competition. Nevertheless, lite scene at Ihe tanker's a.m. arrival Monday was not not unlike the half-time locker room of a team that is down but not out. COL. FRANK A P E 9filh Bomb Wing Vice-Commander, and thc Bomb Comp project officer from Dyess, tried lo cheer up the crew of the to Last er, including ils pilot, "Crash" this year for high altitude McKall. In fact, Col. Apcl bombing, was a high enough said that the ability of lite t t Bj tanker, crew to score even the few points Ihey did was a Wlthln slnk-credit to lltem under condi- ing distance for that honor, lions wliicb could have knock- The competition ends Friday ccl them completely out of the evening wilh an award cere-scoring. Several of the Abilene civil- along with a group of Dyess personnel, were out on the night line to help boost the morale of Hie incoming crew. The tanker will have ils last chance to score in ils other mission Wednesday nighl, while the B52 Bomber will make its last mission Tuesday evening. The [anker's problem of course, did not affect Hie bomber's chances for several special trophies that" only those planes are in the running for. The Dyess B52 is still fourth in Ihe running for the Mathis Trophy, which is presented to the lop bomoer unit on the basis of its bombing and navigation scores. THAT TROPHY is regarded as one of the lop three awards. The B52 also stands third in Ihe running for the Outstanding Mission Trophy, which goes lo Ihc highest air crew in each aircraft category. That means that among all 19 D52's out of Ihe 27 bombers of all types competing, Dysss's third place has them in excellent shape. A bombing competition spokesman also said that Ihe bomber's fifth place position in the standings for the Linebacker Trophy, a new one to be awarded for Ihe first Falls After Shower Jack Frost touched Abilene Monday morning because of ICO per cent relative humidity and a low of 40 degrees. The cold air is the result of a high -pressure system far lo llic northwest United Way Countdown 2 Days Left Goal: Raised to date: Takes Post for Algeria WASHINGTON (AP) Former Atty. Gen. Rieliard G. Kleindienst says he is cm-ployed to represent the interests of Algeria in lite United Slates. Kleindienst, who has practiced law since his resignation in April 1073, serves as ''legal counsel for business circles, congressional relations and re-. lalions with the various official government bodies in Washington, D.C., and the rest of the United according to documents on file in the Justice Department. Agenls for foreign powers are required lo register with.. Ihe department. IT air into the region off the backside of a departed cold f r o n t, which moved 1 through Sunday. A shower, which dropped .30 inch of moisture Sunday morning, may be the last rain thc city gets for a while, forecasters indicated. THE TOTAL amount of rainfall for the year is now 32.31; for the month, 1.75. Normal for Ihe year Ihrougli Monday is 21.81; for the month, Abilene rainfall charts for past years indicate that 1974's rainfall may be comparable lo lhat in 1969 1961 (35.55) or 1357 Because of Ihc cold air circulating in out of tlie north, temperatures should dip inlo upper 30s Tuesday 2-Dav Tola'l Municipal Airport .30 .'ID Total for Year 32.31 Normal for Year 21.81 2102 Bcechwood .70 2041 Butternut 1.00 1.20 Dvess AFB .30 .47 BAIRD .75 BALLINGKH .05 BLACKWKLL .40 BRECKENR1DGE .08 .20 BROWNWOOD 'JY .10 COAHOMA .10 COLEMAN .39 .40 COLORADO CITY .07 .17 COMANCHE .30 .40 DUBLIN .54 .72 GOLDTIIWAITK TR GOREE .20 ,10 HAWLEY .20 MERKKL .20 .40 HANGER TR ROTAN .50 SEYMOUR .21 STAMFORD .30 SYLVESTER United Way Needing in 2 Days Wilh two wdjxing days re- money than any other Abilene maining and needed to project, reach a record goal of The fund drive provides the in the 1974-75 United Fund major financial support for 20 Campaign, Executive Director local agencies. Bo Justice Monday expressed justice said that more than "every confidence we will 99 per cent of Ihe funds col-make it, and make it on iectcd in the drive slay in Abi-lime." ]cne. The small percentage The final report meeting and [hat gocs out of the area "victory celebration" is sched- might go to a national USD uled for noon Wednesday at office lo help finance services the Petroleum Club with the f0r Abilene servicemen al New Car Dealers Assn. and USDs throughout tlie world, the Abilene Assn. of Insurance Less than 10 per cent of the Agents picking up Ihe tab for money collected goes for ad-Ihe luncheon. ministrative costs, leaving 90 Justice said the main con- per cent foi- thc agencies, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCI Nolional Weather- Service IWeallier Map, Pg. JA) ABILENE AND VICINITY roJius) today through Tw.irtciv-WIFd alteffioons ond cool ogaln tonight. Ncrrficrly winds 5 to 15 mpn. High Qdej-ncon In the upper Lev; loniqhT in Ihe upper 30i, High r.wr 70, High ond low for 24 hours frrriing 9 a.m.; 59 JO. High tirKl low wme dale TosJ year: U a nil 44. Simme today: lunipi lonrghr: Sunrise lonn arrow: cards which are already coin- milted turned in by Wednes- day. "J TII1NK IVE sllll have some ,big ones Justice said, naming.Ihc Stale High- way Department as a major conlributor "lhat can make a difference." to date, has been pledged by contributors in what has been called Ihe larg- est civic endeavor undertaken each year involving more vol- unteer workers, raising more lice said. NEWS INDEX Juvenile Judges Face New Trend IOC Bridge SB Business Mirror 9C Classified 5-8C Comics................. -1C Editorials 4A Horoscope 2A Hospital Patients 3A Obituaries 6A Sports................ 1-3C To Your Good Health -13 TV. Log IOC TV Scout.............. 1 OC Women's News 3B Bobby Fischer May Lose Chess Crown By RICHARD de WEGER Assodaled Press Writer AMSTERDAM, Netherlands (AP) Bobby Fischer's chess crown will go to a Russian if the dispute between the Amer- ican and Ihe International Chess Federation isn't settled by April 1, the president of the federation says. Dr. Max Euwe said in an interview Sunday he will strip the 31-year-old American of his crown unless he agrees (o defend it under Ihc scoring rules set by the federation, which is known us Fide. "At the moment we are in a complete Euwe said. Al its June meeting in Nice, France, Ihe'Fide congress re- jected Fischer's demand for a new scoring system for the 1975 title match.. When he learned of this, Fischer sent a telegram to the federation's headquarter'3 in Amsterdam, saying his demands were "non-negotiable" and renounc- ing his title. "We advised him thai he had until April 1 to make up his mind, and appealed to him lo reconsider his position in the interest of the chess play- ing world. But so far the world champion has not react- ed lo our Euwe said. Euwe, 73 and a former world champion, said Fischer "could go on claiming he is the real world champion, but that is something he should prove by playing." "I hope, I even expect, a solution can be he added. "I know Fischer to be a fair player and I feel rather confident he will drop his de- mands if we succeed in con- vincing him they are unrea- sonable." Until Fischer defeated Boris Spassky for thc championship in 1972, the world title was a Soviet monopoly. By JOEDACY If np-norler-New; Staff Wriler BROWNWOOD -Texas' ju- venile justice system, beset by court rulings and new laws, will be the focus of a Brown- wood stale seminar Monday through Wednesday. The program, sponsored by the Texas Center on the Judi- ciary, a branch of the Texas Bar Assn., is expected lo draw about 40 juvenile judges front all over Texas. "Shack" Nail, the associate director of that branch, said in Brownwood Monday morn- ing that the purpose of Ihe seminar would be lo help Ihese judges become aware of Ihe juvenile corrections silua- tion in Texas. "A lot of Ihese judges are fDiiiy Nail explained. Because of a recent federal court ruling lhat Galcsville School for Boys be closed down in favor of commimily- based corrections facilities, programs by Ihe Texas Youlh Council will also be included. TIIR THHKR-DAY seminar will have four main topics: A outline of the Stale Master Plan for Juvenile Corrections by David H. Bland, director of program de- velopment of Carkhuff Asso- ciates Inc. of Amhursl, Mass., Ihe firm hired by TYC lo de- velop new directions and pro- grams in Texas. Bland is to speak at p.m. Monday at the Holiday Inn in Brownwood, following iin afternoon lour of Brown- wood Slate Home and School. Sue Cunningham of TYC snitl iii Austin Monday that (lie Council would be "heavily in- volved" in Ihe seminar be- cause of the judge's order lhal Gatcsville be closed. She indicated that the million proposal, outlined in Dallas recently by TYC board chairman Forrest Smilh, was slill tentative. She added that TYC rcpre- scnlalivcs would Attempt to explain Ihc current situation brought about by the court's ruling. A RKVrKW of Title III of Hie Family Code at 0 a.m. Tuesday by University of Tex- as law professor Robert Daw- son. Nail said one provision of lhat code has concerned many juvenile judges: the require- ment lhat all juvenile judges be attorneys. Juvenile judges are required to appointed by law in each county by the Juvenile Board t o lhat county. A review of federal court decisions and national trends in juvenile law by Judge Noah Wcinstein of St. Louis, Mo., at p.m. Tuesday. A panel discussion of "fu- ture directions of TYC" by ex- eculive director Ron Jackson and several Council members, beginning al 9 a.m. Wednes- day. TYC's master plan, which may be adopted by the Coun- cil by this December, is high- lighted by four different pro- grains. MRS. CUNNINGHAM said TYC is in tlie process of for- mulntiiiK a budget for Ihese projects: million lo divert mi- nor offenders from institution- al care through counseling of parents and children and by placing juvenile offenders in "a'lternale environments." million to provide county supplements on an 80- 20 slate-counly ratio to be used lo help counties develop these alternative facilities nt Ihe local level. S3 million lo increase the effectiveness of county proba- tion departments by requiring further training. million to supplement the probation department's use of conlract services for allernative such as foster homes and halfway houses. TAYLOR COUNTY'S juve- nile judge, Domestic Relations Court Judge Henry Strauss, said Monday, "I'm hoping lo get there for awhile, at least for one day." Strauss said his schedule would not permit him to at- tend all three days of Ihc sem- inar, but Hint he is "shooting for Tuesday when they'll talk ahoul Ihc law end ol it."   

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