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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: October 30, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 30, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 94TH.YEAR, NO. 134 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 30, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Price 15 Cenls Associated Prta (IP) Surgical Shock Threatens Nixon AP Wlropliolo NIXON'S DAUGHTER ARRIVES Tricia Cox cnlcrs hospital By RICHARD SALTUS Associated Press Writer LONG BEACH, Calif. (APJ- Former President Richard M. Nixon is in critical condi- tion today after lapsing inlo shock for three hours and ex- periencing internal bleeding following surgery for phlebitis. "The doctors are fighting for that man's hospital spokesman Nor m a n Nagcr told newsmen Tuesday night. He said later he didn't mean Ihe statement to carry the se- riousness it denoted. Hut a source close to the situation later confided, "I know the doctors are worried" about Nixon's chances of sur- vival. In a statement read by N'a- ger, Dr. John C. Lungrcn said a learn of physicians adminis- tered "countershock measures for three hours until a stable viisc'ilar (circulation) condi- tion .as once again restored" late Tuesday- He added, "The patient is still considered critical." Lungrcn said Nixon, 01, was under round-the-clock care by a learn of specially (rained in- tensive care nurses and thai Dr. Eldon B. Ilickman, [he cardiovascular specialist who performed the operation, would spend the night near Nixon. Nixon's wife, Pat, was with Nixon after the surgery. A Nixon aide described her as "strained and trying lo keep herself up during these diffi- cult times." Mrs. Nixon was later joined by Nixon's' longtime personal Rose Mary Woods, and the two Nixon daughters, Tricia Nixon Cox and Julie Nixon' Eisenhower, who flew in from Ihe East Const. Mrs. Nixon and her two daughters remained with tlie' former president until late Tuesday night and then went to the seaside villa at San Clemente, 50 miles south of Long Beach, so the former president could have "undis- turbed said a Nixon aide. A White House, spokes- man sent word lhat President Kord was for Nixon. Lungrcn said Nixon's pulse rale had increased and he had a slight fever, lie said Nixon was receiving medication in- travenously. Twelve hours earlier, sur- geons had attached a plastic clip resembling ii clothespin wilh leelh to a vein in Nix- on's groin to control a newly discovered blood clot resulting IVoni Ihc phlebitis in his left leg. Tlie jaw-like clip allows blood lo flow, but impedes the movement of Ufc-llircatcning clots to the heart and lungs. In Memphis, Tenn., Dr. rtoberl M. Miles, inventor of the surgical clip used in Nix- on's operation, said lhat poslo- pevalive hemorrhage'is infre- quent and patient shock Is rare in lhat type of surgery. A five-man medical Icain participated in the hour-long operation which started at a.m. Tuesday. After Ihe operation described as rela- tively simple doctors told a news conference lhat the for- mer chief executive was "doing well." Ban on Paint Sales to Juveniles Eyed Rainfall Despite nv JOE DACY llial kind of forecast, Importer-News Staff Writer officials "said Wednesday A brighl but lhat Ihey are becom- Wednesday morning helied forecasters' predictions of increasingly worried about flooding condilions in Ihe city lent weather, which was Ihe locally heavy rains do pected to develop- sometime National Weather W A T E U S II p I. Bill forecaster D. W. Eck said reported that all of the Ihundcrslorms bearing are full to overflowing front is expected' lo Lake Abilene running through Hie area at 15 inches above spill- Wednesday, bringing the Lake Fort Phantom at 18 sibility of locally heavy and Lake Kirby lapping The cool front slipped an inch below its spiflway. extreme West Texas said Tuesday that Wednesday morning, especially in Ihc panied by chilly 4 0 Addition, could occur temperature on the rate, dura- Evidence of the building and amount of rainfalL weather conditions was a.m. Wednesday, ent Ihrough Ihe night radar indicated an slrong southerly winds of scattered showers and peak gusts of 30 mph lo Ihe north the northeast of there, wilh heaviest activity 25 miles THE SOUTH wind kept of Ihe city. midily in Ihe upper 80 a.m the cold front cent range and added muggy temperatures in the upper 60s throughout the defined as extending from cast of Dalharl, lo west of Lnbbock lo near Wink in far The warm and humid contrasted sharply with Texas north winds in the El Paso area, which was behind the eastward-moving front Rainfall for Octovcr, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Inches, has already Weather Service (Weather Map, Pg. the normal for Ihe month AND VICINITY [ID-mife rodiue.1 Considerable cloudiness wUh 2.GO, bringing Ihe total for forms lodoy Ihrough Thursday. chance of locally heavy rains today. year to 29.17. compared to lonighl crvd Thursday. Southerly normal of 21.33 15 lo 75 mph becoming B to 18 mph Thursday. High in Ihe 70s. Low tonight near 50. High BdrLCSUdj Thursrfoy in Jhe mlrf 60s. Probability of At a.m. W per cent 60 per cent morning, forecasters said find 30 per renl Thursday. Wind warnings are In effect on area lakes probability of rain was 90 and (or 14 tiours ending 9 cent, 80 per cenl for EO arxf 63. High and low same date lasl year: 73 day night and 30 per 51. Sunrise lottoy: sunset Sunrise tomorrow: By KITTY FRIEDEN Reporter-News Slaff Writer Glue and paint-sniffing have been described by one expert as being in "Hie same league willi while pos- sessing the potential [or per- manent damage equal to that caused by alcoholism. YeL the actual inhaling of, or the sale of such solvents, to juveniles is not unlawful in Abilene. The newly-formed Outreach Committee of the YMCA is recommending the YMCA board of directors propose a city ordinance to the Abilene City Council thai would ban the sale of acrylic paints to juveniles not accompanied by their parents. "I THINK it's one of the besl ideas we've had in Abi- lene in a long Taylor Counly Juvenile Officer George Maxwell said of a pos- sible ordinance here. "We've got a problem wilh U.. Something needs to be he added. lias such an ordi- nance, pertaining only to the sale of model glue. Dallas City Attorney Alex Bickley said the passed three years ago, has had-much support, from merchants who have been careful riot to sell the product to youngsters. Abilene YMCA program director and Outreach Com- millee member Jerry Calcott said there are a few mer- chants in Abilene who have already volunteered to make acrylics less accessible to chil- dren by placing the solvents behind the counter where the child must ask for them. In Abilene it is acrylic spray paints thai make up the ma- jority of the solvenl-sniffing problems, City Juvenile Offi- cer U. M. R. Dcnson said. He .said the use of glue for "get- ling high" is rare in Abilene. The most common method used to become intoxicated on spray paint, according to po- lice, is to spray the paint in a plastic bag and inhale il which can be deadly. THE PLASTIC bags are of- len bread wrappers or the sacks found in (he fresh fruit and vegetable sections of gro- cery stores. Benson said most youngsters in Abilene seem to use the gold or silver spray paint. Denson said a juvenile can be taken inlo custody if he is intoxicated, but he is usually released to his parents and the case is later referred lo the County Juvenile Office. County Juvenile Officer Maxwell said last year he re- ceived referrals on cases of painl and glue-sniffing by 27 boys and 12 girls. "These are only the ones who are ar- rested and talked he said. "There s so many kids Iliat aren't picked up." tic added that if a child is arrested several times for the incident Maxwell or his assis- tant may talk over Ihc prob- lem wilh Hie child and his p'ar- ents. But that doesn't solve the problem, he added. lie said some cases are referred to Our House or other drug counseling programs. MAXWELL SAID he (eels the most likely solution would be the passage of a state law banning tlie sale of the sol- vents to minors. "If tliey were my own kids if they have to do some- thing like that I'd rather see them on pot than on Maxwell-said, noting the dangers of inhaling paint or glue. Dr. James Vick, chief of drug abuse for the regional Mental IIcallh-Mcntal Retar- dation Center, said the sniffing of such solvenls as glue and paint may result in permanent damage. He added that sometimes it is the paint filler thai is more damaging.than the paint base. He warned that aerosols are dangerous because 'of Iheir possible content of nitrogen oxide and freon. He said sometimes the freon can cause a temporary para- lysis freezing the vocal cords. "It can be loxic. It can coat Ihe lungs and prevent breath- lie added. VICKS SAID inhaling of the acrylics or glue has immedi- ate effecls similar to alcohol, Sometimes Ihe user will be- come dizzy, laugh unconlrolla- by or have "psychotic epi- sodes." Vision may be blurred or double and Ihe pulse rale may increase, he said. The later effects of solvent- sniffing may be nausea, diar- rhea, drowsiness, depression and sometimes memory loss. The doclor cited side effecls as confusion, imparted judg- ment, poor coordination and sound distortion. He said long term users of the solvenls may face anemia, damage to Iheir brains and bone marrow, kidney failure and seizures of delirium. 'AINT-SNIFF1KG A' DEADLY 'HIGH' ordinance here would limit paint sale Texas Ranger 'Proud' But Not Emotional Over Award NEWS INDEX Amusements Bridge Business Mirror Classified Ccmics Editorials.......... Horoscope......... Hospital Patients Obituaries Snorts To Your Good Health TV Log TV Scout Women's News 6B 5C 10A 7-IIC 6C 4A 2A AC 9C 1-3C 3A 6B 2-3B SWEETWATEK Texas Hanger Gene Graves of Sweet- ivafcr has learned in a long law-Enforcement career lo lake tilings in stride. Like adjusting to a new, very different criminal proce- dure code. Or being named top Department of Public Saf- ely law enforcement officer in Texas for 197-1 (and.receiving a check for with the lionor.) "It didn't stir me up Animal Calls Respect No Clock By ELL1E RUCKEB Q. Why are dog cafchers allowed to drive cily pick-ups home from work at 5 p.m.? They're furnished transporta- tion lo and from work. A. Somebody's.horse is as likely lo get loose and wander around the streets at 2 a.m. as 2 p.m., therefore all animal con- trol people are on call 24 'hours a day. Animal Control Superintendent Carl Cor- nelius says Ihcy hours of the day and night. In fact, not.long ago a ealtlc ttuck turned over in the middle of the night, left cattle strung out from Tyc Ihe Abilene Holiday Inn. Cattle, horses and such on Hie highways can be hazard- ous (o a driver's health. Q. Just offhand, do you know If Braniff owns part of any other air- line? We're gelling ready lo lake a trip and I want lo be sure I don't use any airline connected wilh Braniff be- oust of (heir disgusting cOmyr'Vclal. A. Braniff doesn't own any other airline though it has some hotel interests. But. before you get off on a hate-Braniff cam- paign, are you sure you have the right airline? Bran iff's last commercial was having the most distinguished ad- dress in Ihc sky, "747 Braniff Place." Continental advertises, "We move, our lails for and National Air Lines uses the line, "I'm Emma, fly me." Both com- mercials have caused a slorm of protest from indignant employes. Air Micrbesia is an extension of Conti- nental; it flies the U.S. trust territories in .the North Pacific, but no airline in the U.S. is owned by another airline. The FAA disapproves highly of such. 0. T know one time you wrote that It was all right (a turn left M red from a one-way street onto another one-way. But say you're crossing Sayles Blvd., get caught in the middle by a red light and M-anl (o turn onto Sayles. There's practically no traffic out there in Ihc middle, can you turn left? A. Nope, the rule still holds, bnlh streets must be one-way and your cross streets on Sayles are not. Youtoe got lo wail for Ihe green, says Police Sgl. Jack Hurst. Only in certain spots downtown are there one-way streets intersecting each other. Q. I read Action Line every day and .sometimes I clip out items of interest for my son in Houston. You helped me so now I'd like to contribute. I saw a few months back where somebody asked fnr a cure for mange. I know an old, old-timey sure-cure remedy. Gel some Milestone powder at a drug store, put enough in a washlub lo turn Ihe water blue, (ben bathe the dog real good and don't rinse It off. It absolutely works. A. We always appreciate helpful readers and hope you'll continue lo send us your good hints. If this works for yon, that says something, bul a vet tells us it has no effect whatsoever on demodeclic or snr- coplic mange which are Ihc two most common lypes of mange. He says some animals cure themselves with no medication and that's why so many home remedies abound. Good heallh is ono cure for mange. Practically every dog, or at least 85 per cent, entry miles that cause mange. A dog in good health has a high resistance. Pcor heallh and low resistance will cause it to flare up but it can he overcome once Ihc dog's resistance is built up. Tite first thing you should do is see a vet so he can diagnose the trouble. Somp- limes a dog may lose hair from an allergy to grass or fleas. Q. I just called the police depart- ment and Ihcy said they don'l make vacation checks anymore lo make sure doors are locked and so forlh. Would yon find out why? police department is shorllianded "It was a good thing and we liked to do il but it just got so big and completely tied up two cars all the says Police Major C. A. Vcleto. They still do routine palrols, not real oflen, .but as much as Ihcy can. They'll drive ky anil look your place over, hut won't gel oul of the cars. Address questions (n Action Line, Bov 30, Abilene, Texas 7MOI. Names will nol be used bul questions must he stgnrd and addresses given. Please lit- (cleiiltone numbers If possible. said Graves. "I'm not a very emotional man. I am very proud of il." Graves, 51, received the check Tuesday from Mrs. Lyndon B. .1 a h n s o it. The award is sponsored by Snyder oilman-rancher C. T. Mc- I.aughlin, a former chairman of the Texas Public Safety Commission. The check is provided by the Diamond M Foundation, THE SWEETlVATER-bascil Hanger first joined the DPS Sept. 1, 1041 as a student pa- trolman. He has worked as a driver's license patrolman and a highway patrolman. The biggest change in law- enforcement procedure is the new Texas penal code which went into effect Jan. 1, 1974, believes Graves. "11 repealed my entire legal said Graves. "I don't know whether it's good or he said, adding lhat law enforcement-officials would operate equally as well under the new penal code as they did under Ihe old, once they learn it well. Among superiors comment- ing on Graves' abilities were, his commanding officer, Tex- as Hanger Capt. James Riddle of Midland, and Col. Wilson Spoir, director of DPS. "HE HAS 5IOIIE knowledge about courlroom procedure and demeanor than any offi- cnr I Capl. Kiddies said. Speir called Graves "an out- standing Ranger who has made the transition from tll2 old lo the nev; concept of law enforcement." A three-member committee of E. D. Walker. Univesrity of Texas vice chancellor, Austin businessman Dave Smith, and former Congressman Joe Kil- pore of Anslin, helped the DPS make the selection for the second annual award. Graves, a Sweetwaler resi- dent since Feb. 1, 1054, is a member of Ihe Sweetwater Downtown Lions Club, Fjrsl Methodist Church and is a Mason. He is a director of Ihc West Central Texas Council of Gov- ernments, and a past 'director of the West Central Texas Peace Officers Assn. In 1971, the Nolan Counly liar Assn. prescnled Graves an award for personal and professional achievement. Mail bring in YOIM FAMILY WEEKENDER Wml A. Dentiim: Thun.-lOO P.M. 3 MYS-Fri-Wt-SM. (15 Ixtro W-md-IS [xh BIG SHOPPERS In trie lij CHHmy SHOP THROUGH FAMILY WEEKENDER ADS CASH ONLY (Nil plume criers. Plem)   

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