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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: October 29, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 29, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR-WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS :QR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT J4TH YEAR, NO. 133 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, TUESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 29, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Price 15 Ceills -'lisociated Preit (If) 360-Degree Bumper? U isn't that Dan Upton of Santa Bar- just using this convenient, way lo. get to Hie bara, Calif., is trying to fend off colli- beach with the big inner tube he uses to frolic sions from the front, sides or rear. He's in the surf. (AP Wirephoto) Officer Bought Drugs...and Fell To Part of His Job TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) -It was part of Tucson policeman Barry lleadricks' job lo buy narcotics in a crackdown on drug users. He heroin al an apartment near the University of Arizona Monday afternoon. Less than an hour lalcr.be was dead. The 27-year-old undercover agent, honored many times by the police department, diet! in 3 hail of bullets with a sus- pected heroin dealer. A man identified only as Chuck Ferguson was reported in critical-condition today at Arizona Medical Center with a gunshot .wound in the head. Two olhers were wounded in the gun battle al Ihe Colony Apartments, aboul two blocks from Ihc university. Police said lie ail ricks bought one ounce of Mexican heroin and one ounce of Viet- namese heroin and returned with nine policemen and a deputy Pima County attorney about 15 minutes later to make anxsls. With lleadricks in the lead, Ihe officers burst into the sec- ond-floor, apartment. llead- ricks "did not walk into the apartment with his gun out" although he knew the suspects were armed, police Maj. Clar- ence D'.ipnik said. "Officers were flooding the apartment and the sliooling occurred almost instantaneous- ly." Five suspects scattered. One ran into a bedroom and Head- ricks followed, investigators Officers said a woman in Ihe bedroom was wounded and a man oulside the room was hit. by a bullet that slammed through a wall or'door. llcadricks' with al least three bullet'wounds, was found on the bed and Fergu- son on the Hoar nearby, police said. Those .wounded besides Fer- guson were Debra Kay John- in the left thigh and left arm, and Rufus J. Mincey, 23, shot in the but- tocks, police said. Both lived in the apartment. Other suspecls were identi- fied as John P. Hodgman, 20, and Carol D. Greenwalt, 16, bolh of Tucson. She was turned over to juvenile court authorities on narcotics charges. Murder charges were pend- ing against Mincey and Hodg- man, Sgl. Robert Moreland said. Surgery Concluded Nixon Doing Well By JACK! KING LONG BEACH, Calif. (AP) Former President Richard ST. Nixon's surgeon said today that "Mr. Nixon is doing well" following an operation to stop a blood clot in his left leg from traveling any flirther to- ward his heart or lungs. Dr. Eldon Hickman, who performed the hour-long oper- ation, said Nixon's condition was "stable." He said Nixon relumed to. his room on the lop of Memorial Hospital Med- ical Center of Long Beach for recovery. Nixon's personal physician had said the operation was re- quired because the clots in Nixon's leg posed a threat to his life. "With the tlireal the clot, could become a pulmonary embolus, we placed a mild clip partially occluding but not completely occluding the llickman said. He said the clip was permanent. He said the operation was uneventful and that the former president was "recovering in tlie normal manner." The doctor said he had Ihe usual postoperative effects of being sleepy and was confined to bed. The operation began at a.m. None of Nixon's family was present at the hospital, but officials said his wife, Pal, was expected at the hospital later in the day. Hickman said Nixon will probably be hospitalized for "another then the re- covery would take four to six weeks at home. lie said he did not anticipate any further surgery. Dr. John C. Lnngren, Nix- on's personal physician, said he had consulted with Nixon's wife, Pat, and daughters Julie and Tricia by telephone Mon- day night. Lungrcn was an observer at the surgery. -Both llickman and Lungrcn noted lhal Nixon will be pro- hibited from eating a regular diet initially and will be fed intravenously today. Lungrcn, who had warned that bleeding nught be a prob- lem during surgery because of anlicoagiilation therapy, said there was no excessive bleed- ing during the operation. Nixon was given no extra doses of Vitamin K lo prevent excessive Weeding during the s u i1 g e r y. Doctors said he would continue to receive he- parin, as he had before the operation, to prevent further dotting. The decision lo operate was made late Monday after a medical team determined Ihe tesls showed a worsening blood clot condition from the phlebitis Nixon suffers in liis log. Nixon's youngest daughter, Julie Nixon Eisenhower, said surgeons at Memorial Hospital Medical Center had wanted lo Monday night, but "he was too weak, lie's exhaust- ed." She said her mother, Pat, would be at the hospital dur- ing Ihe operation, but tliere vras HO confirmation from hos- pital officials today that she had been Ihcrc. Nixon. who entered Ihc hos- pital reluctantly last day for a second time since he resigned as president Aug. !l, agreed to undergo the surgery recommended by his own pliy- sicin.il and consultants. Minter Park Construction Ready Though still shy an estimat- ed in funds, work will begin immediately on the Vcra Hall Minter Park down- town. This announcement came iu a news conference at the Chamber.'of Commerce Tues- day morning from the Abilene Kiwanis Club, sponsor of the project through its foundation established for thai purpose. Ed Wishcamper, president of Ihe Abilene Kiwanis Foun- dation, and Nib Shaw, cam- paign chairman, told reporters Ihat had been contrib- uled to date for the park. They said at least will be needed, and gilts are siill being accepted. Wishcamper said the origi- nal park cost estimate has been cut sharply by care- ful study, planning and by sev- eral significant, contributions in both materials and work to date. AMONG THE gifts in work, services and materials made thus far, Wishcamper listed: Tittle, Lulhei- Loving, ar- chitects, all the planning, design and architectural su- pervision. Jim Tittle of Ihat firm is a member of Ihe park's Task Force. Removal of debris from demolition of the old Queen Theater, the 96th Civil Engi- neering Squadron of Dyess Air Force Base. Killing and compacting the site, Pet. 1 County Commis- sioner Bert Chapman and his personnel. PL. E. Jnnes Gravel Co. Inc., all the dill for filling, which totaled more than 600 cubic yards. Wishcamper expressed the sponsor s appreciation of these public service contributions, NEWiTlMDEX Amusements...........8C Bridge 5A Business Mirror...........5A Clossified 4-7C Comics................. 2D Ediloriols 6A Horoscope 5A Hospital Polienls BA Obituaries...............3A Sporls I-3C To Your Good Health......4A TV Log 8C TV Scout 6C Women's News...........3B and also for all Hie cash from individuals, businesses and organizations. Wishcamper said Ihc park Task Force in a meeting Mon- day afternoon heard a report on Ihe project's progress and authorized work to start im- 111 e d i a L e 1 y. Commissioner Chapman did the filling and compacting work last week. said Paul Ronine, a member of the Abi- lene Kiwanis Club, and a gen- eral contractor, will be super- intendent of. the park construc- tion. He will sub-contract various phases of work. Among the major sub-contractors will be Webb numbing Co. which will do the plumbing and install the waterfall which will be the park's central feature. Bill Webb of that company also is a member nf Ihe Abilene Xiwanis Club and will do the work at cost, Wishcamper said. said Ihe work will be pushed to completion as soon as weather and availa- bility of men and materials make possible, but ho could not estimate when Ihe work will be finished. Will D. Minter, former long- time head of Minter's Inc., gave Ihe old Queen Theater at N. 2nd and Cypress Sts. lor the park, Tlic park will be lo his late wife, Vera Hall Minter, who died in 1961. She was former chairman of the board of the Abilene Public Library and led the movement which resulted in building the present library at N. 2nd and Cedar Sis. CallahanOfficials Ponder Hospital Lease Proposal BOB CAMPBELL Iteporter-News Staff Writer BAIRD Callahan County Commissioners and hospital board members were meeting Tuesday morning lo decide if Callahan County Hospital will be leased lo an organization called Texas Medical Assis- tance Service. County Judge A.K. Dyer Jr., who was also silting in on the meeting at the county court- house here, said the "group is leasing or is otherwise affiliat- ed mlh other hospitals in small Texas cities and staffing them with Filipino physicians, lie said an offer had been re- ceived from the organization to lease the Callahan County Hospital. No decision has been made concerning what would happen to the hospital if it is not leased to the organization. Raird sources told the Re- porlor-News that Callahan County Hospital has been a growing source for concern because it lacks a Baird-based physician and has become in- creasingly expensive to oper- ate. Operation costs apparent- ly were a prime reason why Ihe leasing offer was being considered. Haird lias not had a doclor for about two years, and Dr. J.E. Mikeska Jr. of Clyde has been serving Baird residents. Callahan County Commis- sioners are Jiggs Shackelford of Putnam, Irvin Corn of Baird, Lowell Johnson of Oplin and Duke Mitchell of Cross Plains. Hospital board members are l.G. Mobley of Putnam, Ster- ling Odom of Cross Plains, I.E. Warren of Baird and George Yanlis of Clyde. Cold May 'Stab' Big Country By JOU DACY II Reporter-News Stair Writer Winter weather cold lem- peratures and rain may take a slab at the Big Coimlry area beginning Tuesday night when a western cold front is expected lo blow through Abi- lene. Forecasters at Ihc National Weather Service said Tuesday morning lhal, despite (lie morning's fair skies, thunder- storm-ridden weather will be- gin to build Tuesday night and Wednesday. Two cold fronts, one ahead of the other, are developing due west of Ihe elate in Kast- Vehicle Parking Protest Too Late By ELLIR RUCKER Q. Is Ihe "Alarmed Taxpayer" group going lo get concerned about some- thing which Is constantly getting worse, detracts from an otherwise at- tractive neighborhood and depresses market values of surroniKrJng proper- ty? I refer (o parking of molor homes, trailers, boats, campers, elc. In resi- dential areas. A prime example Is a house on Elm-. wood Drive a motor home, a pick-up wilh camper, a van. two boats and (hree cars. A neat nsed-car lot would look better. Is Ihere anything In the zoning ordinance to prevent such a A, Nol anymore, you're a month too laic. Our City Council passed a zoning ordinance Sept. 26 Ihat from this day for- ward allows recreational vehicles lo be parked anywhere on private property. City Planning and Zoning Dcpt. sug- gested campers, trailers and such either be placed on the back of the lot or screened from view but recreational vehi- cle ovflicrs organized, appeared before the council and, as sometimes happens.. wheel that squeaked the-loudest got Ihe grease." The proposed section of the ordi- nance was dropped. And planning and zon- ing Director Lee Roy George is not about to propose it again'without some support. "Alarmed Taxpayers" are concerned primarily with home occupations. We have a fueling you'll have to start your own group. Q. When will (hey lake us off Huh- bard water and put us back cltv water? A. You've been drinking it since Sept. 17 svhen Phantom Lake filled up 100 proof Abilene water. Our city water superintend- ent was-crushed that you hadn't noticed Ihe difference. Phantom water is less salty, he says, and it's softer. Q. Around Ihls lime-last year, a Catholic church sponsored a turkey festival in "a tear Abilene. We didn't go becaise a bad storm but I have 'relalfves visiting the Jirsl two weeks in November and tboagnt this rmifihl be someplace interesting (o them. Now 1 can't remember where, it was. A. Probably Rowena. St. Joseph's Cath- olic Church sponsors a turkey and sausage festival. there each year. This year it's Nov. 10, which should lie in with your visitors. Dinner is served from 11 .a.m. til 2 p.m. and 5'till p.m. Tickets are available at Ihe door for for adults, ?l.5fl for children. It's held in the school gym and there will be dancing, games, a cotton auction and maybe even a callle auction. Q. While frying lo teach my hushand how lo ]ilay "Ifcarl and Soul" on our piano, I marked some of the keys with a fell pen. To my astonishnienl Ihc marks wouldn't rub off when I (riccl later. Help! A. Our piano cleaning experts tell us if your piano is old with keys of ivory that you'll just have lo live with Ihe fell marks. Have any colored felt pens? You could drew flowers and butterflies over the marks. If you have a newer piano with plastic keys, buff Ihc marks wilh jeweler's rouge, a clean clolh and a high speed buffer. Address questions lo Action Lino, Box 31, Abilene, Texas 7S6IH. Names will not be used but questions must he signed and addresses given. In- clude telephone numbers If possible. cm New Mexico. Weatherman W. Eck said Ihese fronls are expected to converge and move into Ihc Big Country. TIIHRE fS ALSO a slrong system in the upper atmos- phere which caused heavy snows in Ihe mountains re- gions of the western states early Tuesday morning. That system, now in North- ern Arizona, is expected lo slow its eastward pace and hang back in Western New generating clouds in West Texas skies for Ihc next few days, he said. But Ihe real chr.nge, Kck ex- plained, will be in tempera- tures which are expected lo plummet into the by Wednesday night. D.iylime temps ivill be espe- cially Eck said. Cloudy skies are expected to drop the mercury even lower and hold it down through the day. Bui Ihe extended forecast also calls for more rain by Ihunderslorms roaming the re- gion, Eck said. Although the probability was lisled as 30 per cent for Tues- day night and Wednesday, Eck said this was bccruse fo- recasters were uncertain as lo what period the showers will make Iheir appearance. KCK. SAID HE thinks Tues- day nighl is the best bel, how- ever. A bright, damp morning greeted Abilcnians Tuesday but Eck said lo watch for the f o r m a t i o n' of high cirrus clouds, or marcs' tails, inrti- Ihe encroachment of colder air in Ihe upppcr at- mosphere. Monday m o r n i n g rains, charactcri7ed by a brilliant" electrical display, dropped an- olher 1.04 inches on the city bringing Ihe monthly tola) to 3.67, the yearly lolal lo 29.17. City water superintendent Hill said Tuesday Ihat Lake Kirby is now within inch- es, a tenth of a foot, of its spillway level because of Mon- day's rains. The other [wo lakes. Korl Phantom Hill and Abilene, continue to run over their spillways as they have rince a M-day rainy period drenched the city in September. Weems said lhal a heavy rain on lite Kirhy watershed could cause flooding again in Ihe Carver Addition of Abi- lene. always that possi- he said, adding [hat Ihe chance depended on where it rained, how much and how fast. Kck said anolher rainy spell could come as early as Tues- day night or al some lime Wednesday. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COHMCRVi National Wwlhtr (Weather Map, 3A) ABILENE AND VICINITY [10-mlIf rotlius) [ncrroslng cloudiness wllh d chance of (founder ihovverj I on to hi and Wednesday, A lililc cooler Wednesday. Saulherly winds 10 to ?0 mpTi becominq norlherly 10 lo 15 rrph (onlghL High today [n tlie upper 70i. Low [airrjhl in Ihe low High Wednesday In the low 70s. Probability of rain M ptr cenl lorVqM anrt Wedneidav. High and low [or 31 hwrs ending o.m.: 75 and S3. High and lavs same dale las! year; 74 41 Sunrise loday: night: iunrli to-   

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