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Abilene Reporter News: Friday, October 25, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 25, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                Ibttene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 94TH YEAR, NO. 130 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, FRIDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 25, PAGES. IN FOUR SECTIONS Price 15 Cents Associated Prta By ELLIE RUCKEK Flood Feeds Fish, Causing Poor Fishing Q. Does anyone know yet what ef- fect, if any, all the new water has on lake fishing? Does a higher water lev- el and a different composition nave any effect? A. Right after an influx of water, fish go" on a feeding spree with all the new insects and aquatic larvae stirred up by incoming water. Generally.fishing is pool- for about a week aflcr a new supply of fresh food has washed into the lake. Bass, in particu- lar, won't while the water's muddy. By now though, fishing should be back to normal and Fisheries Biologist Roy ISamberg says it should continue to be good through mid-November. A. higher water level provides more spawning room for young fish, thus little fishies have cover to hide from big fish. This means more survive and we should have more fish in the spring and better fishing. Q. Are pyracanlha Jicrrics edible? have a, bumper crop. Our dog and our neighbor's dog eat them and seem lo (hrive. If edible, any good recipes from Action Line? A. Anything birds eat, humans can. eat and birds love pyracanlha terries. Marine Harmon, home economist for Lone Star Gas, dug through her file of "Weirdo came up with this one for you. Okay, pyracanlha jelly. You need two cups pyracantha juice and you get that by using equal parts washed fruit and water placed in a non-metal container. Let stand overnight, boil five minutes the next morning, mash, slrain and squeeze to re- move juice. For the best jelly, only one- thiid of your berries should be ripe. Place 2 cups juice over heal, bring lo a boil, arid 2 cups sugar, boil about 5 min- utes or until il sheets from Ihc spoon (the jelly Skim off.loam, pour inlo lid sterilized jars. If unusual jellies are your Ihing, Home Economist Kathryn Cawley lias recipe for caclus, hot pepper and red rose geranium jelly, loo. Q. AVUh all the hullabaloo over fool- hall referees, a thought Is bugging me. A friend of mine is a referee on a part-time basis and he makes as much as a week at such activities. Does the Abilene school system pay these guys In such a way lhat It would lie definitely rejiortable as income? In other words, are (hey paid by check and at the end of the year furnished with a W-2 form? Or are they on their honor !o pay income (ax, rather lhan forced? How cxaclly is a referee's salary delermlncd? Who pays (hem? A All game officials including refer- ees are paid by check by the home school says Athletic Director Shorty Law- son, and not sent a W-2 form. They're on their honor to pay just like anybody else. Lawson says officiating comes under self- employment; they pay a self-employment tax and must file a quarterly estimate on their officiating income. Fees are determined by gate receipts in a formula- set up by the University Inler- sdiolaslic League. If gate receipts are up to Slffl an official is paid S12-50; 5150 to to ?17.50; and so on until we gel within our high school range which is somewhere around lo S7.5DO and the rcf and his crew each makes per game. Each makes if the receipts range from to Cooper-Lee game paid officials To make a game, gate receipts must Ijc to Officials also are given R travel allowance and local meals. Q. The movie, "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" is said to be true. Well, I never heard anything about it in Ihe papers 'Where did it take place? What happened IB (he killers? In Ihe movie they were left alive, I womlcr where Ihc girl survivor is now. can't be- lieve thai it's (rue. A. The movie was inspired by a factual occurrence 20 years ago in Wisconsin. A man had been robbing graves and luring children to Iheir deaths for several years. Their bones he used to builc! furniture for his home. That much is true. The movie script lakes off from there lo create a crazy family of four men who ten'orize and kill all bill one of a group of youllis traveling through a sparsely populated part of Texas. The movie is mostly fic- tion, based on a lacl. Address questions (o Aclion Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 79M4. Names will not- be used hut questions must be signed and addresses given. Please in- clude telephone numbers if possible. Nixon Lawyers Granted Transcript Request By HARRY F. ROSENTHAL Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) U.S. District Judge John J. Sirica today granted a request bj Kichard M. Nixon's lawyers that (he former president be supplied with transcripts of While House (ape recordings so he can prepare to testify at the Watergate .cover-up trial. Meanwhile, former White House counsel John. W. Dean III was on the witness stand today for his eighth, and pos- sibly last, day of testimony. Nixon's attorney, Herbert ,1. requested Ihc tran- scripts recently, pointing out that Nixon had no other re- cords available ,to him and could not come to Washington lo prepare adequately because of his illness. Nixon has been suffering from phlebitis, a blood clot condilion, since before lie left the White House. He has been subpoenaed as a witness by both the prosecu- tion and defense and Miller said recently he expected to be able lo report soon that Nixon was well enough lo come-lo Washington and testi- Howcvcr, Nixon was hospi- talized in Long Beach, Calif., W c d n c s d a y night because blood clols in his leg were not responding lo drug treatment and doctors said Thursday the former president may have to undergo surgery. There has been no word to the court on whether Miller's earlier prediction that Nixon would be able to testify slill stands in lighl of his present condition. TOmpucrs in the courtroom became so strained Thursday lhat Sirica Ihrealcned lo take action lo prevent "a carnival atmosphere." "I mean the 70-year-uld federal judge said, exasperat- ed and oflen angered by con- tinual bickering and back-bil- ing among lawyers. "If I don't get the cooperation I waul, I'm going lo have to do some- thing about it." As ils second witness, the government planned lo call E. Howard llunl Jr., Ihe former CIA agent and While House consultant, who pleaded guilty lo being one of Ihe principals in the Watergate break-in. Bnl pointing out that Hunt cooperated with Ihc investiga- tion "only grudgingly and, we believe, Ihe government asked that the court rather than Ihc prose- cution adopt Hnnl as ils witness. In such a case neither the prosecution nor defense vouch- es for a witness' credibility and it allows bolh sides to ask leading questions. The Irial of II.R. llaldeman, John D. IChrlichnian, John N. Mitchell, Robert C. Marriian and Kenneth W. Parkinson, all charged with conspiracy lo ob- struct juslice, was in its lOlh day today. Dean was the first witness called. The arguments and objec- tions had increased in frequen- cy Ihe last few days, involving at times the judge and one or another of the defense law- yers, prosecution and defense, and even defense attorney against defense attorney. "There is finger-pointing in this courtroom, there probably will be more of Ehrlich- inan's attorney, William' S. i'ralcs said at one poinl. First Bank Cuts Prime Rate lo 11% NEW YORK (AP) First National City Bank, the mi-., lion's second-largest commer- cial bank, today became the first major bank to announce a cut in its prime lending rate to 11 per cent. The quarter-point reduction affects Ihe rale Ihe bank charges on loans to lop-rated business borrowers. The change goes into effect Mon- day. II was Ihe fourth consecu- tive week Iliat Citibank has sliced Ihe key short-term rale because of u moderation in business loan demand and .similar recent declines in oth- er short-Icrm rales like com- mercial paper. Most oilier major bunks' primes sland aL either 11.5 per i cent or 11.25 per cenL, depend- ing on numerous factors such as business loan demand pres- sures and a given bank's own debl structure. The prime rate is considered a bellwether of oilier short- term money market rates. While il is not a direct influ- ence on consumer loan rales, the prime often foreshadows future trends in the lending market. Nuclear Arms Limits Kissinger Tries To Break Logjam Bellwether of Victory? The Cooper spirit boosters really aren't being tricky with the sign in front of Hie school. It's tlie District 5-AAAA bell thai the Cougars hope to win. The game Fri- day night against Odessa Permian in Odessa is a big one and if .the Cougars beat (he Mighty Mojo their chances of going lo the district finals are good. (.Staff photo by Don Blakley) B.V BARRY SCmVElD Associated Press Writer MOSCOW (AP) Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger conveyed concrete U.S. propo- sitions on nuclear amis limita- tions lo Soviet leader Leonid I. Brezhnev today at Ihe Krem- lin, hoping they could break the negotiating logjam on a new 10-year treaty. The two-hour and 20-minnlc discussion, described by U.S. sources as being in a "very friendly and very cordial al- mospliere" was aimed aL agreement on- guidelines that Brezhnev and President Ford could endorse around Thanks- giving at a meeting, probably in Vladivostok. Kissinger is banking on (he Kremilin's evident eagerness lo. assess: the new president firsthand ;is, nn incentive [o achieve the. "conceptual break-through" that eluded Kissinger last March and again at Ihe summer summit here with former President Richard M.Nixon., U.S. officials suggest pri- vately that Brezhnev and his Politburo colleagues held back in Ihe -last months of Water- gale, uncertain about Nixon's slaying power. Ford's repeat- ed endorsements of Kissinger are intended to signal the Rus- sians that any steps taken now lo promote the Geneva arms negotiations can have a per- manent result: a weapons pad by the end of 1975. At their first meeting Thui'St. day, Kissinger arid Brezhnev surveyed trade relations -Jie- Lwceir their two countries lUeir conflicting approaches.to the Arab-Israeli dispute.. Kissinger said they made "a very good beginning" but gayt no details. Foreign Minister" Andrei A. Gromyko said both sides were encouraged aiid: Brezhnev was' pleased. Bolfi Gromyko and Kissjii-'; ger renewed their govern-.; c o m m i t in e n I' (o; SovieNAmnrican detente in' luncheon loasts, and Kissinger' emphasized'that this Anierj-I caii policy was the change in tlie U.S.presfK dency.. "Ku.rlh.er and big successes- require efforts and vigorous efforts, on both said UK Russian. "We arc preparccHo make'those'efforls." New Front Enters Texas Panhandle Ford: Demos the Lillians' Forecasters at the National Wenlher Service said Friday lhat Ihe weather pattern around the Big Country is making Ihc transilion from cloudy to fair. Chances of rain still exist through Friday; however, tlie weatherman said Saturday's conditions should be fair and cool. THE WEAK COLD front which caused the rain is ex- pected to move slowly east- ward lo a line from Harrison lo Texarkana, Ark., to College Stalion and Laredo by late Saturday. The fair skies may be short-lived, however, as anoth- er cold front entered the Tex- as Panhandle early Friday morning. State forecasters said thai litlle adverse weather had been reported but noted a five-degree drop in tempera- lure lo Ihe north. Temperatures are expected lo be in Ihe lower SDs Satur- day morning. ___ THURSDAY'S rainfall left another .55 inch on Abilene, which brings Hie total for this spate of showers to .93; 2.62 for Ihe month; 28.12 for the year. Normal for the year is 21.03 through Friday. The Cily of Coleman mea- sured Ihe largest 'amount of rain Thursday, 4.20 inches, and seven other Big .Country poinls caught two inches or belter in their rain gauges. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, Naironol Wealher Service IWealher Map. Pd- 3-A) ABILENE ANO VICINITY radius) cloudy wilh a chance of thundeuhowc-rs Decreasing cloudiness wilti a sllghl chance of Ihun- lonignt. Moslly ialr Satur- day. Soulherly svinds 10 lo 20 mpli becoming northerly 10 to 15 mph to- nighl. Aitcrnacn highs In Ihe middle 60s. Low.tonigM in Ihe lower 50s. Probablll- 1v or roin 30 per cent today, 20 per cenl tonlahl. High and low for "H hours ending 9 and IT. end Sunrise loiay: lanlght: CHICAGO (AP) President Ford has finally come right out and said it: big spenders are responsible for the coun- try's inflalion woes and ,lhe "villains" are Ihe Democrats in Congress. In a string of campaign ap- pearances Thursday on behalf of struggling Republican can- didates, Ihe President accused Democrats of ruining the economy will] four decades of reckless spending and of now threatening foreign policy. "There are many Ex-Gangster Says He Found, Then Lost Patricia Hearst LOS ANGELES (AP) Former gangster Jlickey Coh- en, enlisted by Randolph A. and Catherine Hearst to find Iheir kidnaped daughter, says he knew where she was 10 days ago, but doesn't know where she is now. In separate interviews Thursday with NBC-TV and San Francisco television re- porter Marilyn Baker, Cohen said lie used his own money and various contacts some of I hem members or sympa- thizers of the Symbionesc Lib- eration Army to trace SLA members William and Kmily Thieu Firing 377 Officers By GEOHGK ESPEK Associalcd Press Writer SAIGON, Soulh Vietnam (AP) President Nguyen Van Thieu's government is fir- ing 377 officers for corruption, Schools View 'Human Skills' Acceptonce, understand- ing and value clarification are the watchwords of a new attitude which is slowly be- ing infused into Abilene's public education system. The approach, which stress- es "human is ex- plained on Page 1-B. NEWS INDEX Amusemenls ?B Bridge 2A Business Mirror 3A Classified 1-7D Comics .................-7C Editorials Horoscope Hospitol Palienls 3A Obiluaries Sporls To Your Good Health...... >D Travel 4-5B TV Log TV Scout 7B Women's News 2-3B the defense ministry an- nounced today. It was President Nguyen Van Thieu's second action this week to quiet criticism of .his regime in the United States Congress and at home. On Thursday, he fired (our mem- bers of his cabinet, including Information Minister Iloang Due Nha, a relative of Ihe president and his closest confi- dant. A defense ministry conimu- niriue said the officers to be dismissed had been "corrupt and dishonest." ft said they included 20 colonels, 101 lieu- tenant colonels .and 256 ma- jors. A number of junior olficers also will be dismissed for cor- ruption, Ihe communique said, bul il did not say how many. II said Ihe dismissals would begin Nov. 1 and would be completed by the end of De- cember. There was no immediate re- action lo loday's announce- ment, bul initial reaction from anti-Thicu political leaders to the firing of Ihe four cabinet ministers indicated it would not end public demonstrations charging the president wilh corruption and mismanage- ment and demanding his own .resignation. "If Mr. Tliieu will nol change his policies, or ir he remains in office, I don't Ihink I here will be a major said Tran Van Tuy- cn, an opposition member ol Ihe National Assembly, Harris and 2U-year-old Pally Kearsi. Cohen, who said he began Ihe as a personal favor Id the Hearst family, refused (o say where Miss Hearst was when he located her except, thiit file was not in California. He added that he never saw Ihc girl himself. "I couldn't, my parole board won'l lei me go he said. lip also said she has since moved and lhal he didn't lell where she was. Broad- catl reports thai Miss Hcarsl might bo in Canada did not corns Tiom him, he said- The FBI and the Canadian Mounl- ed Police said Ihey had no information on reports lhat she had been localed in Cana- da or near Ihe U.S.-Canadian border. The llearsls were not imme- dialely available for cornment. In the NRG interview, Cohen said iifc kept rnurn on Miss Hearst's whereabouts because would arrest her if Ihey [mud licr. "When I knew she would liKve to come in lo go to prison, I said, just forget about il as far as I'm con- ccmcO. I don't bring nobody in In go In Cohen said. Ford lold a per plale fund raising dinner here. "But Ihe biggest burden of guill lies on tiie shoulders of (lie biggest spenders. "And Ihe fact is that one political party has run the Congress aiid held open Ihe nation's purse strings for 38 of Ihe last 42 years, and for the past straight 20 years. "That party is Ihe Demo- cralic parly, and we cannot allow it lo diivc file budget deeper inln the red and Ihe rale of inflation higher inlo the blue." Then Ford repeated his now familiar campaign slogan lhat the country needs an inflation- proof Republican Congress and not a veto-proof Demo- cratic one. It was perhaps Ford's most direcl assault on his former congressional colleagues, but even Ihen he tempered it, ad libbing inlo his prepared: speech in a GOP luncheon in lies Moines, Iowa, lhat the Democratic leadership was acting responsibly, although "Iheir troops run wild." Ford also renewed the for- eign policy theme whjch stirred a furor Tuesday i'in Oklahoma City and Cleveland when he said the elcclion of the "wrong kind of Congress" could endanger world peace. The White House said Wednesday that Ford only meant lo sli-ess the impor- tance of a bipartisan foreign policy. But Ford look anolher direct shot at the Democrats Thursday, accusing them 'ol "undermining our foreign fe- lalions with handcuff-like re- strictions on the policies of the President and (he secretary of slate." Air Force Plans Air of Excitement Visitors lo Dyess Air Force Base's Open House Salurday will be. able lo view a special demonstration of Ihe Low Alti- lude Parachute Hxlraclion System, along with a para- chute jump by Ihe 1st Aerial Port Squadron. Why the sky isn't tilled with parachutes and low buzz- ing planes of the 463rd Tacti- cal Airlift Wing, many ground displays and demonstrations will be on view during the 10 a.m. lo 3 p.m. annual open house. THE 96lh Security Police Squadron will present a sentry dog demonstration. Many aircraft, including the most modern fighters and bombers, will be on ground display. Several will be open lor the public lo view from the inside out. At noon tlie Mire-raft which will represent Dyess and Hie Big Country in the 1974 Bomb- ing Navigation Competition Nov. 10-16 will be dedicated. The B52 bomber, the mainslay of Ihe Strategic Air Command, will be christened "The Big Country Bomber" and the KC135 jet tanker will be pre- sented as a member of the "Abilene Refueling Compa- ny." FLIGHT AND maintenance crews will be present for the ceremonies, as well as civilian engineers. The dedication of the refur- bished World War II B17 "Flying Fortress" will also he held Saturday. The plane was recently lifted by helicopter to, (he base alter having spent several years near the old airv port. Activilics will center on Ihe Building 5020 Saturday. Visitors should en- ter the base by Uie maip gatei   

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