Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Abilene Reporter News: Monday, September 30, 1974 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 30, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                Abilene porter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 94TH YEAH, NO. 105 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 30, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Price 15 Cenls Associated Prtit (A By ELLIE IIUCKER 'Improper Address' Delays Delivery Q. M'c luive a new deal at Ihe post office Ihe labels on first class mail that read, "delayed due lo Improper address." Let me just use the Report- er-News as an example. Suppose I have no knowledge oi your post office hox lieinE number 30. If I elect to consult (be. phone directory I find that your street address is listed 1IH) Cy- press. Would that he an improper ad- dress? A. Well. yes. According to Ihe post of- lice our physical location is not llic same as our mailing address. If a business in- structs the posl office to have mail put in a post office box [lien lu's mailing address is Jiot liis slreel address. How does one know all this in advance? "It's up to the company to notify their says Mel Layne at the post office. The mail will, of course, eventually reach the bos but in most cases it's delay- ed 2-1 hours because it's first sent to the carrier who makes street deliveries, who sends it to the man who looks up correct box numbers, then on Ihe the. box section. The "delayed" notation, says Layne, is like that 2x4 used to nil llie mule over the head. It gels your attention. Q. How come Miss Teenage, Abilene Is from Colorado City? A. because Colorado City is part o( the local Dr. Pepper distribution area and Dr. Pepper sponsors the pageant. The Abilene contest encompasses 26 counties all those in the Dr. Pepper distribution area. We could even have a Miss Abilene from Del Rio as the Abilene Dr. Pepper Bot- tling Co. reaches Iliat far. Once a girl entered our pageant from Mineral Wells which is practically next door to Fort Worth but isn't in the Fort Woilli Dr. Popper distribution area. Q. IVhy did KORQ-FM replace Is KOItQ a 21 hour sta- tion? A. Nope and it didn't replace KNIT. KNIT is most definitely still among the living, 103.1 on your dial. KORQ operates at 100.7 from ill Hie morning till midnight. Within three or four months it will begin programming 2-1 hours a day. Q. A group of devoted Elvis fans have drawn up a proclamation pro- claiming Oct. 9 as Klvis Presley Day. The mayor Is going lo sign it and now the only problem is gelling the procla- mation to Khis. fl'e need Col. Tom Parker's address. A. Col. Parker is going to be reading Abilene mail for Uie next decade. Surely people have called for his address. Write Parker at Box 417, Memphis, Ten- nessee. Q. I had my son's picture made by Lynn's Studios at Wcslgalc. It was raining and our family was sick with the flu (be day we were (o pick them up so we wcn( the next day. No one at Weslgate knew anything about the whereabouts of the pictures There's no address on the slip of pa- per (hey gave us. We'd appreciate any help. A. Lynn's Sludios operates out o! Big Spring but a representative will relurn to Weslgate Mall Oct. 3 and 4. Drop the company a note (Box 2392, zip 79720) and your pictures will bo sent with the rep. He was here only two days on his last visit, but (lie Weslgate Merchants Associa- tion president assured us the studio is reputable, reliable and was thoroughly checked out by the Belter Business Bu- reau. Address qircstions lo Action Line, Box ,10, Abilene, Texas 79604. Names will not be used but must be signed and addresses givrn. I'lease inclnde tele phone numbers of possible. fc. Contraband In Closet Okay Guns, knives, marijuana and narcotic paraphernalia. Those ore just a few of the items Mrs. H. Don Rodgers found recently when she cleaned out her closet. But it's alright: she's official court reporter for the 42nd District Court, and all that contraband is evi- dence from old criminal coses. Story, Pg. 1-B. Amusements.............6B Bridge 1 )A Business Mirror 9A Classified -4-8C Comics 78 Horoscope 4B Patients Objluories Socrts............ To Your Good Hcalih TV Lot] TV Scout Women's News 3A 9C 1-3C IIA 6B 63 Great Gobbler Gallop Paycheck, a fleet-Cooled lurkcy from Worlhirvgton, Mirin., is off to a good start ahead of. Ruby Begonia 11, of- Cuero, Tex., jp Uie final heat of. the Great Gob- bler Gallop. Paycheck lost Sunday's race at but went home With the Travel- ing. Turkey Trophy of Tumultuous Triumphs 'because of better for Ihe tworlicat race. Ruby Begonia II, s lauds flat-fooled (right.) as-Dennis.Van-Becst urges Paycheck on with a noisy tambourine. (AP Wircphoto) Portuguese Chief Quits LISRON, Portugal (AP) Gen. Antonio de Spinola re- signed as president of Portu- gal today, claiming he was powerless lo prcpenl Uie coun- try's slide into chaos and an- archy. The Junta of National Salva- tion, comprising Ihe military rulers who overthrew Ihe heirs of the Salazar dictatorship last April, quickly appointed as Spinola's successor Gen. Fran- cisco Costa Gomes, long con- sidered Ihe president's lop as- sistant in the junta. Spinola resigned after left- ists forced his rightist support- ers to cancel a weekend rally in the general's honor. But Ihe underlying causes of Spinola's departure were basic disa- greements with Hie left over Ihc pace with which reforms were being introduced in post-revolutionary Portuguese society. His departure removed Uie Truant Crackdown Pledged in Boston BOSTON (AP) School officials have vowed lo crack down on truancy as Ihe racial- ly troubled Boston school sys- tem enters its I bird week of court-ordered desegregation. "Meanwhile, a n t i b u s i n g- lorces planned a march and black leaders scheduled a ral- ly for today. The Boston School Depart- rienl, on orders from Stale Education Commissioner Ore- gory Anrig, began cracking down on absenteeism. John R. Conkley of the de- partment's Educational Plan- ning Center said 29 of Ihe 32 attendance officers will be "concentrating on the identifi- cation of students who are ab- sent and consultations wilh parents who may be advising their children lo slay out of school." Since classes opened Sept. 12, about of Hie city's pupils have been stay- ing out of classes. According to school officials, this is about four times the. usual number. A while pupil boycott lias been most successful in Ihc predominantly Irish South Boston area. Coakley said, "If we exclude 10 or so South Boston schools, citywide attendance is over 60 per cent and there is a closc- lo-normal absence rate in most parts of Ihe city." The Hoslon Sunday Globe said -antibusing leaders have renewed boycott plans nnd will sock a 2-i per cent absen- tee rale next Friday in con- junction with a one- day protest of couri ;dcral desegregation in several cit- ies. In the first 12 days of school intergration. police and school officials said 25 persons have been injured and 72 arrested, 61 of them while. Last week U.S. District Judge W. Arthur Garrity stepped up to Dec. 1C Ihe deadline for submission of a permanent desegregation plan and named Mayor Kevin II. While a codefciidanl in tlie integration case brought by 'black parents and their chil- dren against the school sys- tem. last prominent conservative from the' six-months-bid gov- ernment.. "I cannot and will not take part" in a "berayal of Ihe spirit of the movement" that brought Ihe military to power, Ihe general de- clared in a national telecast. He said part of that spirit was a commitment to "har- mony among all political be- liefs" and added: "This har- mony will never he possible when on one hand (lie de- clared chiefs of some political parties make appeals lo good sense and on the olher hand respective aclivc groups choose HIP, palh of psychologi- cal warfare, through the big news media and even through violence in flagrant negation of liberty." "I lir.d myself facing evi- dence that the program of (he movement of the armed forces is developing in a direction that would result in its own neutralization in a climate of a reversal of moral standards within which true democracy and liberty are Spinola said. He charged that there has liccn a "systematic stirren- rtcr" to "reforms carried out in a maniacal way" which threatened the capacity of the Portuguese people lo define Iheir "democratic institu- tions." Order Leaves Five In Cover-Up Trial WASHINGTON (AP) U.S. District Judge John J. Sirica today ordered a separate Wat- ergate cover-up trial for for- mer White House aide Gordon Klrachaii. The order leaves five de- fendants to face charges in the main cover-up trial scheduled to begin Tuesday. Slrachan's lawyer, John M. Bray, told reporters as he left the'U.S. District Courthouse today, "we've been severed from Ihe cover-up case.'1 The action has been request- ed by Special Prosecutor I.con Jaworski. Sirica also was to rule today on whether he will allow typed transcripts to be used along with some 33 presi- dential tapes the prosecution wants as evidence at the (rial scheduled to start Tuesday. A separate request from Slrachan that the conspiracy, obstruction of justice, and per- jury charges against him be dismissed was denied prejudice by Sirica. The fact [lint the fnolion was denied "without prejudice" means Slraclian can raise the issue again later. The separate trial for Slra- chan is based upon a special legal problem. The one-time personal assistant to White House chief of slaff II. It. Haldeman claims Ihe evidence used to indict him is tainted. Slrachan's attorney has said Slraclian was promised im- munity from prosecution in exchange for testimony before a Watergate grand jury. In a series of appeals, Bray also said his client's testimony before Ihe Senate Watergate Committee was also improper- ly used to obtain the indict- ment. Two U.S. Court of Appeals judges, while refusing lo dis- Sloyings Solved Following Suicide BOZEMAN. Mont. (AP) Four unsolved slayings cover- ing a span of more than seven years apparently were solved when a 25-year-old handyman admitted tlie killings and then committed suicide in his Gal- latin County jail cell, officials .say. County Atlv. Thomas A. Ol- son said'David G. Meirhofci" of Manhattan, a rural Mon- tana community ot about 800, was found hanged Sunday morning. He said Mcirhofer confessed earlier to the widely publi- cised slaying of Susan 'Jaeger, 7, of Kannington Hill, Mich., a Manhattan woman and two youths. Meirhofcr was arrested Fri- day and charged with kidnap- ing and homicide in the deaths of the Jaeger girl and Sandra Dykman Smallegan. 19. After the suicide, District Court Judge W. Lcsslcy impounded Ihe transcripts of Meirhofer's confession and is- sued an order continuing a lid of secrecy he had clamped on the case at the time of the arrest. Mrs. Smallegan was the last of four 'victims in unsolved slayings in Gallntin County. She disappeared Feb. 8 after a basketball game in Manhat- tan. Susan Jaeger, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Jaeger, was taken from a lent June 25, 1973, at a state park where the Gallalin, Madison and Jef- ferson rivers' flow into the Missouri River.' The family said Susan was sleeping in a tent with her older sister and two brothers. The county attorney said Mcirhofer also confessed to the previously unsolved mur- ders of two Manhattan chil- dren. Bernard Poelnian, 13, and Michael nancy, 12. Olson said the tape-recorded statement was witnessed by KBI Special Agent B. II. Dun- bar. Meirhofer's court-appoint- ed lawyer, Douglas Dasinger, also was present. The Poclman boy was cut down by gunfire March 19, 1357, PS he was climbing on a river bridge near Three Forks few miles from the Jaeger campsite at Three Forks Slate Park. Raney, a Boy Scout'-'cainpcd in the same campground from which Susan Jaeger-ymished, was stabbed and beaten while sleeping in a lent May 5, 1368. lie died two days later in a Billings hospital. Authorities said Mcirhofer was arrested after FBI agenls compared a recording of Ms voice wilh a series of recorded telephone calls to Ihe Jaeger family in Michigan. Olson said Mr. and Mrs. Jaeger both identified Meirho- fer's voice as the voice of the man who had placed calls de- manding ransom money. miss Ihe charges against Slra- chan acknowledged lhat his le- gal argument has merit. In his order, Sirica said there is not enough time to resolve the legal'problems pe- culiar to Stracha'n's case be- fore the trial begins. Outside Ihe U.S. District Courthouse, Rvay said he re- garded Sirica's order as a le- gal victory. There was no indi- cation when Slrachan's sepa- rate trial might begin. The main cover-up trial is expected lo last at least three months, and a separate trial for Strachan is unlikely before that ends. The others scheduled to tried are: Former Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell; former chief of staff H.R. Hnldeman; former Nixon domestic counselor John D. Ehrlichman; and .two men who worked for Nixon's re- election commit as- sistant Atty. Gen. Robert C. Mardian and committee law- yer Kenneth W, Parkinson. All are charged with con- spiracy to obstruct justice by attempting lo keep investiga- tors from learning who was responsible for the June-1972- Watergate -break-in and- who knew about it; The grand-jury that indicted the men last March 1 also vot- ed to name then-President Nixon has been subpoenaed asibjoth; a prosecution and de- fense witness but his health has put his appearance.at the in doubl. Potential jurors will be questioned extensively by Siri- ca lo uncover airy, pofential bias and the selection process is expected to take up to: a week, or even longer- Questioning of potential Ju- rors, will begin in the large ceremonial courtroom on the sixth floor of the court house at a.m. EOT Tuesday- Af- ter 12 jurors and six alter- nates are chosen the trial .will move to Sirica's much smaller courtroom, where 175 sets of earphones have been installed for listening lo the tapes. Mother Nature Makes Roundup Contribution Mother nature made her contriailion Monday morning in (he form of a clear sky and warm temperatures for the West Texas C a 111 e m e n 's Roundup for Crippled Chil- dren. More lhan 210 head of cattle had been checked in by early Monday morning for the 1 p.m. sale and approximately 100 heart more had been pledged for sale at a later date. Outstanding buys for the sale included a sire bull from Ihe fJ-Bar Ranch at Cypress, Tex., n Ib. Charolais and several polled hcrefords. Cat- He hnd been donaled for Ihe annual benefit sale from as far south as South Texas and as far north as Oklahoma and Ihe Texas Panhandle. Several head of cattle were not picked up in Ihe Dig Bend Caribbean Gunmen Demand Pullback Ry IKH FI.ORES Associated Press Writer SANTO DOMIW.O, Domini- can Republic (AP) U.S. diplomat Diirbiira Hutchison was reported in good spirits but uncomfortable today in- side Ihe sweltering Venezuelan Consulate where six lef.'st ter- rorists held her and five olher persons hoslagc under threat of dcalh. Early today Ihe gunmen de- manded lhat'policc and troops pull back from tlie two-slory stucco building within two hours, but the government did not comply and Ihe deadline passed without any evidence of hostile action by the terror- ists. "Miss Hutchison has not been maltreated, is good spirits anil is bc'uif Ul led as well as she can under the con- .said U.S. Ambassa- dor Robert A. Hiirwilch. "But she is not comfortable." Miss Hutchison, director of the U.S. Informalion Service in Ihc Dominican licpiiblic, Venezuelan Consul-General Je- sus dc Gregorio and the. others were seized Friday and threat- ened with death unless Ihc ter- rorists got million and safe conduct (n Cuba or Mexico fov thcrnsclvcs and 37 Dominican prisoners. The government re- jected all Ihc demands oxecpl transportation out of the coun- try for the terrorists. On Saturday, Ihe govern- ment cut off the consulate's 1 electricity, which in Uivn shul down the air conditioning and water pumps. The lure inside the has ranged between 90-95 degrees, and the gunmen have refused lo open the windows, appar- ently afraid Hie hostages would try to escape. On Satur- day, one hoslagc leaped lo freedom from a second-floor window. Ilurwilch, who needed a shave and spent a sleepless night, lold newsmen after con- ferring with police lhat mat- Iresses would bo taken into the building soon. "We have been reviewing some of Ihc measures lo make them more comfortable in there and [his is one of (he things we came up he suid. Asked about proirross in ne- gotiations to free the captives, he said: "I wish I could something Uuf IA but my inability lo is only over the concern for Miss Hutchison and the others." lie said Ihe Dominican gov- ernment has "primary respon- sibility" in any negotiations, and lhal he was "hopeful [or a peaceful solution." Archbishop Hugo Polanco, Ihe only person lo enter the consulate Sunday, said Ihe guerrillas asked lhat a negoti- ating commission be set up, "but the Dominican govern- ment has not agreed to act upon thai request." The six hostages and their captors got their first food and drink in hours Sunday when Ihe archbishop look snndwich- cs and soft drinks inlo Ihc consulate. Police sources said the government had agreed lo Ihc.delivery of fooil and f-jhcr necessities twice a dny. r area, due to recent torrential rains and impassable ranch roads. Prospective buyers who looked the "merchandise" over Sunday afternoon had fa- vorable reactions, Charlie Morris, chairman of this year's roundup, said Monday morning. Perfect Autumn Days Predicted Bright, mild days and cool nights under a harvest moon were predicted by National Weather Sen-ice forecasters Monday morning. Weatherman Frank Cannon said a high pressure eel] locat- ed over Texaricana is appar- ently determined lo keep Abi- lene weather fair ant! cool, at least through Tuesday. Kven the threat of an ap- proaching cold front has di- minished, Cannon said. "IT LOOKS AS though it is going to be prelty weak when it gels he said, adding lhal Ihe area should experi- ence Ihc cooler temperature.! behind the front. But there should he no cloud cover and "certainly no pre- cipitation." he said. The high temperature Sun- day was 76, he added. The low temperature, 47, was six de- grees short of a 1D72 record. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OP NriiorM) Wdtncr Scrvici (WMlher Mo. 1 A) ABILENE: AMD VICINITY radlui) Continued fair and mlfrf of- leJTWDni orxl coal nlflhli Hiroogh Tuei- dav. LioM and variable wlndi, Hlflh thlt oltcrnoon nror 80, Low fpnlpTil upfwr High m 1M m'driii illfih orrJ ro.v far 14 houn t n.rn.: Jt and 41. High ond tgmi lilt VMCi N V. Tm Sunme today: iMfeMj   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication