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Abilene Reporter News: Thursday, September 26, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 26, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                gfoflew "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 04TH YEAR, NO. 101 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, THURSDAY EVENING, SEPT. 26, 1974 PAGES IN FOUR SECTIONS Price 15 Cents Associated Press AF Unravels Problem For Flag Wavers Ky JIM CONLEY Reporter-News Military Editor The school children at Buf- falo Gap Elementary school arc flying the American Flag their pole again, thanks lo Dycss Air Force Rase and its OOlh Civil Engineering squadron. On Wednesday, two airmen from the squadron brought a truck with a 1 o n g -a r m e <1 "cherry picker" compartment to the school and, to the de- light, of the children and oilier onlookers, untie! several knots in the poles rope. THE KNOTS, which a school official said might have been tied by vandals, had kept the rope from being usable foi- ling raising. School principal Charles Vales had asked a private lo help, but it want- ed 5100 to do the job, which required the airmen only 15 minutes, a Byess spokesman said. Yates finally .tried Dyess, which through tlie' Lase commander's office re- sponded by ofCerins to help. The school was looking for- ward particularly to Veterans 1 ;iy Hag ceremonies on Oct. 28. AS IT TURNED out, Dyess Civil Engineers A.I.C Aaron Jackson and A.I.C Thomas Swick not only got Ihe knots out; they also put in a new rope. Perhaps almost as impor- tant, they made a whole school full of new friends for themselves and for the U.S. Air Force. Soviet Missile Ship Blows Up ISTANBUL, Turkey (AP) of comparable A Soviet guided missile about 350 men, stroyer exploded in the lo Sea on Wednesday, of the Kashin mv naval sources said Ihe first warships in Port sources said the lo rely entirely on belonged to Ihe Kastiin for and was attached to the but they i Black Sea rapidly outdated by form according to A Kashin class destroyer is 470 feel long, 52 feet of the ships go li weighs Ions fully in Leningrad and lias four missiles four antiaircraft guns, was no rocket launchers and five of the pcdo lubes, according Jrom any other Jane's Fighting London. U.S. Navy An American guided said Ihcy had no million about such an cxplo- The NATO southern naval command in Italy said il loo had no -information on the re- nt A spokesman for the U.S. (itli Fleet in Naples said his headquarters also had no in- formation, but pointed out (hat such reports normally would go io the U.S. Navy offices in The Turkish navy monitors Soviet naval movements from the Black Sea into the Medi- terranean through Ihe Darda- nelles., which are controlled by Red Space Lab Lands A.I.C. AARON D. JACKSON HELPS UNTIE KNOTS IN iie and A.I.C. Thomas Swick made short work of (he problem Wednesday MOSCOW (At1) The Sovi- et space lab Salyul 3 ended its mission aflcr three ntanths in orbit, Tass announced today. The brief announcement said Salyut 3 had "completed its entire planned program of research work" and the re- coverable module was sepa- rated from the station Monday and landed in Hie Soviet Union. Salyul 3 was launched June 25 and in July a two-man Sovi- et crew linked Soyuz 14 to Ihe lab and spent 14 days aboard. Last month a Soyuz 15 mis- sion approached the lab, bill Ihe automatic docking system railed Ic work and the cosmo- nauts cul tlieir mission short and returned lo earth. The Tass dispatch did not say what had happened to the nourecovcrable part of the Salyul spacecraft, but the an- nouncement ruled out any more space research for Ihe lab. The world's first manned space lab was established in Salyut 1, which burned up as II re-entered the atmosphere in October 1971, after six months in [light. Development of space labo- ratories has always had a high priority in Ihe Soviet program, and the Salyul was developed as a the basic vehicle. It has four cabins and looks like a huge telescope with wings. Sutyul 2 was launched in April 1973, but was never manned because it apparently lost ils solar panels during the first few hours of .flight and was crippled. The Soviets, who customarily say nothing or space program shortcom- ings unless they are sell-evi- dent, did not announce any trouble with Salyut '2 and said only thai it liad concluded ils Slight program. Jobless Claims Take Big Jump Forecasters Point With Pleasure to Blue Skies Butz's Road Show Sells Food "Fair and Fore- casters at the National Weath- er Service issued llial predic- tion with pleasure Thursday nnd said these conditions should last for al least four clays. "We had a big high pressure system move in on us, from the central plains weatherman Jerry 0'Bryant explained. "IT LOOKS like we ought lo have three or four days of good weather before another front comes he said. A front which had been ex- pected lo push through Thurs- day has slid off to the east, O'Bryanl added, and, in fact, cvrylhing lias moved casl- waril. The rains, tlie fog, the low pressure center in Mexico which had pumped moisture into the area ana that front all drifted due east, he said. "THAT'S THE natural direction of things, casl and soulhcasl in the northern hem- he added. In addition that liigh pres- sure center is situated so llial it will bring a southerly wind flow into the area comple- menting a warming trend, he said. 'r Steps Up Fitness Pace Keeping in shape con be a problem when the wea- ther turns cold, so the YMCA hos stepped up its fit- ness programs for Abilen- ians. The programs and newly remodeled health clubs ore discussed in a story by Staff Writer Phil Shook on Pg. 1-B. NEWS INDEX An-iUiements............. 8C Bridge 5C business Miircr 6C Business Nolcs 83 Comics. 9C tdiloriols 4A Horoscope BO Hcspital Poticnls 3A Obituaries 4B 1-2O TJ Your Good Health...... 2A TV Leg 3C Women's News 3B By DON KENDALL AP Farm Writer WASHINGTON (AP) A circus-tent road show with hymns and patriotic displays being considered by the Agri- culture .Department lo calsn public fever over food prices is producing a chill among some members of Congress and consumer spokesmen. Tlalph Nader called the plan wailing on official (JSDA attempt by Secretary of Agriculture Karl L. Bulz lo brainwash consumers. Sen. George S. McGovcrn, D-S.D., described the project as "Dr. Bulz's travelling med- icine show" and said the de- partment should worry more seriously about Ihe plight of fanners and consumers. "Perhaps some of our older citizens and others on fixed incomes would prefer less electronic hoopla from the ad- ministration's public image- makers and more substantive explanations why their 'food prices go higher and higher, while farmer and ranchers are going broke and middlemen's profits keep .McGovcrn said. The comments followed dis- closure Wednesday dial an aide lo Butz proposed the lent show and thai il sliould visit cities across the country lo correct wlial lie described as distorted view" consum- ers are gelling. Rep. W. li. Poagc, D-Teras, chairman of the House Agri- culture Committee, said lhn proposal is "not tlie kind of thing llial would occur lo me" and added he would remain neutral until he knew more about it. But Rep. Spark II. Malsuna- ga, D-Ilawaii, said USDA "has lost touch with reality" and will be a laughingstock if the plan is adopted. And Rep. Benjamin S. D- X.Y.., said it was an "oulri'. gcous idea" in its cnliroly. A spokesman for the de'parl- menl's Office of Communica- tion said numerous calls wore received after the lent show plan was disclosed, most of them either wauling more in- fomiation or in criticism of Ilic plan. No cost estimates were available, bul officials said the alive for con- involve fi- nancial backing from the food industry. As proposed, Ihe show would he directed at convincing con- sumers that U.S. food prices are Ihe lowest in Ihe world and that Americans really are gelling bargains. The show would include pa- geantry and music calling at- tention to Ihe American histo- ry of food and farmers, begin- ning with Ihe Pilgrims and concluding with his fall's liar- cst, highlighted by prayers and patriotic songs. (AP) -The government indicator designed to foreshadow future trends in the economy suffered its sharpest drop of tlie year in August, Ihe Commerce De- partment reported today. Most of (lie drop was attrib- uted to sagging slock prices, but the index of leading indi- cators also was pushed down by the largest number of new unemployment claims lor any month since March. The Commerce Department said the o v e r -a 11 index dropped by 1.2 per cent on Ihe basis of figures available for S of the 12 components involved. The downturn, the second so far this year, reversed a 1.9 per cent jump in July and was the largest drop since a 1.7 per cent decline in December. This left the index 5.7 per cent ahead of vtherc it was a year ago. In reality, the decline proba- bly was more severe than it appeared, because the index does nol take account of infla- tion. Four of Hie components in Ihe index track the prices of vital goods, so that inflation would drive the components up automatically, even with- out any gain in tlie actual vol- ume of goods involved. New claims for unemploy- ment insurance totaled last month, a 10.5 -per cent increase over the previous month. Slock prices were off 10.3 per cent by the Com- merce calculations. Also pointing to slower eco- nomic activity were a falloff in the number of building per- mits issued, lower prices for industrial materials and re- duced' orders for factory ex- pansion and equipment. Exerting an upward influ- ence on the government index were a longer average work week, increased orders for du- rable goods and improvement in Ihe price of goods relative to the cost of labor needed to produce them. The four remaining catego- ries which arc tabulated and used in subsequent adjustment of the monthly figures, are corporate profits: changes in consumer installment debt; changes in book values of manufacturing and trade in- ventories, and business forma- tions. Corn Crop Hurt Badly by Frost No Home Occupation Notice Needed riUCKEll (1. Could von clear up something for us concerning the. new zoning laws? If I keep a relative's children, do I have io he registered as a home occupation with Ihe city? I babysit my (wo grandchildren and a niece, A. No, in fact, you don't have (o register home occupations at all, says Lee Roy George of city planning and zoning. You may keep up to six children in your home. With more than six (other than your own family) you wouldn't have lo register, but you'd lie in trouble since over seven is illegal in a single family district. Q. To winterize my Hryanl air-cnn- dillourr I must use mclhanol anli- frccvc. So far tins jcar I've Iiccn una- ble lo find it for sale by anyone. Could yon help locale some mclhanol? A. Don't worry, if you have a residential unit you probably wnn'l need anti-frecac. lialpji Nelson at Lone Star (Ins Co. says il won't freeze up unless you try to operate il in 50 degree or below wcalher. But if you fed more secure knowing Ihe mclha- nol is in there, he'll help you find some. Drop liivn a note al Box 3058 here in Abilene. Q. I am a 20-year-old young woman who Is hard of hearing. I have a high school diploma and don'l usually have I rouble communicating if the person speaks fluently al all. My problem Is I can't find a job. I've filled out numerous applications, am always turned down because of my handicap. I'm a hard worker, catch on fast and fed like I'm as nrirmal as the next person. All I waul is a chance. Where can a handicapped person find employment here? A. Abilene has Ihrce or lour companies that arc real good about hiring handi- capped workers. Your first move should be toward Ilic Texas Employment Com- mission at Hickory. Talk with an em- ployment counselor. There's no charge for this .service. If you feel iikc your hearing deficiency 'is what's causing difficulty in finding a job, you miglil waul lo drop by Texas Vocational Rehabilitation 705 Alexander Building. A heaiing aid might be His an- swer or yon can te trained (or a specific occupation. Q. About (hose safe deposit boxes It a husband and wife have a safe deposit nox and one or the other dies, docs the one that's left have any trou- ble gelling into II? The box Is in both our names and we both have a key. Can the one left behind gel Inlo the box whenever that person desires? A. In talking lo different bankers we discovered tlie actual practice varies from one bank lo another but according lo (he law a bank is required lo lake inventory and give notice of tlie contents of the box lo the slate comptroller first. Ten days from the dale Ihe comptroller is notified, if (he comptroller consents in writing, the sui-vivor is allowed access lo the bo.t. Naturally, ihcro arc exceptions a will can be removed, a deed lo a burial plot or any insurance policy. Check with your blinker lo see how he vunilrt handle particular case. 0 I have an eld burroughs adding machine with a handle and it's on a stand. I plan (o give il (o a museum in Colcninn bill would like to have some Idea of how old It is. The number on il is 6-l3.iD39. I'm guessing GO or B5 years. I urole the company six years ago anil they sairt they didn't make this particular machine. A. Maybe they've forgotten because they did make il, around 1910. Howard Meadows, sales manager for Burroughs Corp. has a list of the machines, their serial numbers and dales of mamifoelure as far back as 1930 irilh number The company has boon in existence since Ilic ISOOs so in his head (not even using an adding machine) he calculated how many were manufactured each year, came up with Hie year or possibly a year earlier. Address questions lo Action Line, box M, Abilene, Texas 70691. Names Mill nol he used hut questions must lie signed and addresses given. Please In- clude telephone niiinhcrs if possible. fly Tbe Associated Press Up lo 300 million bushels of corn were destroyed by frost in Hie Midwest this past week- end, according lo an Ameri- can Kami liureau agronomist. Warren Collins also predict- ed thiil the 1974 crop yield will b3 far below Ihe laicst U.S. Department o f Agriculture forecast. Collins said Wednesday that Ihis year's corn harvest will be between 4.6 billion and 17 billion abmit a billion less than the record 1073 yield of 5.GJ billion bushels. The latest Agriculture De- partment estimate was (or a corn harvest of billion bushels. Freezing lemporalurc.s de- stroyed 1 lo 2 per cent ot the crop in northern Illinois, ho slid, about per cent in Iowa up lo 13 per cent in Wis- consin. University of Illinois agrono- mists also reported Wednes- day Hint Hie frost killed all eui'ii and soybean plants noilli of InloT.slnte 30 in Illinois. Yields were nil in proportion lo Hie maturity of Hie plants, jaicl Dcrreld Mukaney, IT agronomist al DcKalb. "Only one Ihiril of the soy- beans were mature enough not lo be affected by Ihe Mulvanoy .said. The others, he siiid, "will have beans smaller than normal and some will be off-color." About DO per ccnl of the corn crop. Mulvtuiey said, mature enough to be oul of frost danger, having been planted before the wet weath- er which began .May 7. WEATHER U.S.' DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE HnilJmr Wcalher Service (Vicolhcr Po  VICINITY (IB-m'lf radios) Fair ond v.ornur tlsrcuq'l FntfkV- boull-crlv Vvir.di S fa li rnpn, M'flh Hib ellrrroori near M- IcnigV in Hiqn in Ihe middle EOs H'qh lor U houri erdif.g 9 a S9 and end lo-v icirrr riAic laM !l fi'Vl C7. f.'ir.iiw fadiiv 7 teivqM;   

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