Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, September 4, 1974 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 4, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 04TH: YEAR, .79 ;PHONE: 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 4, PAGKS IN THREE SECTIONS Price 15 Cents Associated Prtu Pilot Held; Ransom Sought By JOHN STEEPE Associated Press Writer BOSTON (AP) An East- ern Air Lines pilol was held at knifepoint aboard his DCS jet- liner at Logan International Airport today by a man de- manding ransom, au-' thorities reported. The twin-engine plane, a 7 a.m. shuttle from-New York's La Guardia Airport, had just arrived at Boston when it was commandeered. James Caufleld of Boston, a passenger, told Eastern offi- cials that a "voice, was heard' just as the plane reached the gate to unload, .saying twice: "Nobody.out the frofit of the everybody out the win- dow exits." All the passengers and the crew, except the captain, used the window emergency chutes to deplane. John Stiffler, East-. em airport services manager; said there were no injuries. He said the hijacker, de- scribed as'a young man in his 20s, had rushed the cockpit and forced his way inside where he confronted the pilol, 'Capt. L. E. Whitaker of New York City, with a knife. Although he would not cifically say the ransom had been paid, Stiffler told-a news conference, "He (the hijack- er) has not made any de- mands.'-that have not been met." He said officials were await- ing further instructions' from the hijacker, who ordered au- thorities to bring him two steak sandwiches, according to airport spokesman Phil Havran. At midmorniug [he plane sat in the mist at the intersection of two runways. Officials said it was hot in position to take off. An FBI agcnl at the'scene said the hijacker was demand- ing "There is a'problem1 about' distribution (of the the agent said. "We don't have all the facts yet." Witnesses at the scene saw World War H Captivity Recalled An Abilene mon ended more than three years of POW captivity in Japan 29 years ago today. D. R.'Pratr recalls his experiences on page IB. Amusemcnls............ 6B Bridge 9A Business 9A Classified..............A-8C Comics................. 73 Ediloriels 4A Horoscope...............5A Hospital Polienls..........3A Obituaries 2A Sporls 1-3C To Your Good Heallh......8A TV LOQ 6B TV Seoul 6B Woman's News........... 3B a ball of flame conic from tlie engine section, and an Eastern technician said the engine could have shorted out. If that happened, the technician said, the plane would be unable to takeoff. Flights in and out of the air- on Boston liarbor were halted. The last attempted plane hi- jacking in the United States occurred- on Feb. 22 at 'the Baltimore-Washington Interna- tional Airport. A gunman carrying a crude gasoline bomb shot and killed an. airport security guard as he blasted liis way onto a Del- la Airlines I5C9. where he killed a security guard, copi- lot, and then shot himself to death. The gunman, identified by the FBI as Samuel Joseph Byck, 44, was carrying an at- tache case in which there was a crudely made gasoline bomb. He ran up behind air- port security guard George N. Hamsburgh and shot him in the back of the head several times. Then he boarded the plane where he later killed the copilot, Fred Jones, 32, of Dal- las, and then turned the gun on himself. None of the.50 passengers aboard the plane were injured. Domestic hijackings were halted -dramatically at the end of 1972 after then President Nixon ordered strict security measures at airports, includ- ing the use of electronic screening devices to detect weapons. The measures were prompt- ed by a rash of 31 domestic hijackings'during 1972. Medal Winner Protests Amnesty A retired, Medal of Honor winning Army colonel from, Ucrkel launched a one-man protest Wednesday against granting amnesty to .the men '.who fled the country'to avoid .the draft during the Vietnam War. L.L. wearing-his old uniform with 9 rows of ribbons and tlie nation's highest serv- ice award, the Medal of Hon- or, said he will walk the side- walk in front of the Federal Building on -Pine Street for an indefinite period. He passed, out handbills ti- lled "Amnesty 'or Justice" Wednesday morning, and car- ried a sign bearing two mes- sages. One was "Bring home the honored dead the POW, the MIA, before we.welcome the cowards, deserters and pot, smokers." The other side said, de- mand amnesty for me before the cowards, shirkers and des- .erters gel theirs. Veteran WW- II, Korea, Viet." 'Autumn' Temperatures Take a Fall Defeat Near Lt. Gov. Lester Maddbx ,is'shown had lost the Democratic, gubernatorial 'nomina-. ing. io supporters ;at his: ,-tion -to George Busb'ee.. See story, Pg. 7A; (AP headquarters with k stem face' Tuesday iiiglit .when .it-faecijme obvious thai, lie By JOE DACY II Reporter-News.Staff Writer The cold air circulating down from the north did: not break.a'ny records.but it still pushed the mercury down to 53 degrees Wednesday morn- Army Chief GEN. CRE1GIITON ABRAMS surgery complications By RICHARD PVLE Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (A P) Aniiy Chief of Staff Creighton W. Abrams, the general who look command of U.S. forces in Vietnam at a time of crisis in 1968 and oversaw the policy reversal that led Io American withdrawal, died early today. Abrams, who first won fame- as a tough tank commander in World War II, would have besn'60'on Sept. 15. The Army announced that he died at, a.m. EOT at Waller Reed Army Medical Center with Mrs. Abrams and his six children, including Iwo Army officer sons, at his bed-: side.. His death resulted from "complications that developed during recovery from surgical removal of his cancerous lung" on June 6, the Army said. Secretary of the Army How- ard M. Callaway issued a statement saying that "the Army and the country have lost one of the great men of modem times." Callaway said Abrams "pointed the way for the Army in years to come." Hurial will be in Arlington National Cemetery, the Army Arrangements were iri- jlele. Of all the top American offi- cials in Vietnam during (he dozen years of that complex war, perhaps none was as re- alistic, pragmatic and forth- right as. A b rams. Few emerged.-.with their reputa- tions less scarred. When Abrams assumed command of U.S. forces in Vietnam on-July 3, 1968, there were Americans in the of them survi- vors of the' Communist side's devastating T e t offensive. South Vietnam's political sys- tem was in chaos in the coun- tryside, .its military forces were reeling from severe cas- ualties, and President Lyndon 15. Johnson had announced he would not- run again because of divisivcness in the United Stales over his war policies. When Abrams left, five years later, American, forces had preceded him. It was a different kind of assignment and certainly the toughest ever for the rumpled general whose public reputation had been built largely on battlefield heroics. He had been the lank officer who relieved beleaguered A in e r i c an paratroopers at Dead Bastogne in the 19-H Battle of the Bulge and won Gen. George S. ration's accolade as "the best tank commander in the Army." Abrams became chief of staff of the Army on Oct. 16, 1972. He was looking ahead to broad questions confronting the Army in the postwar peri- od the need to restore confi- dence in the trouble-plagued military establishment follow- ing the long and disruptive conflict, reorganization of the Army's command structure, and the transition to an all- volunteer Army. On May 28 of this year, the Army.announced that Abrams had entered Walter Heed Army Medical Center with a "mild form of and three days later disclosed that he had lung cancer. His left lung was removed July 6. Released from the hospital, he returned to the Pentagon on July 25. But Abrams was back at Walter Reed on Aug. 21 with what was described as a blood clot in the leg. Another clot was found in the artery of his remaining right lung. ing, forecasters at the Nation- al Weather Service said. Weatherman -Jerry O'Bryanl said the clear and cool condi- tions should continue for. the next few days with a percepti- ble -warming He cautioned, however, that a new cold front is'.'alfeady" forming in Canada, only five or six days' travel from Abi- lene. A HIGH PRESSURE system, centered over southern Missouri, is still sending the cool air southward- on south- easterly, wines. High tempera- ture Tuesday was 71, O'Bryanl said, and a low near 55 is forecast for Wednesday night. And, although the National Weather Service has decided to change Hurricane Carmen's name Io Tropical Storm Car- men, O'Bryanl said he hasn't WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Notional WMttur Service (Weorher Mop, Pg. 3-A) ABILENE AMD VICINITY 00-mile radius) Clear to portly cloudy and a MIMe warmer totfav Ihrougri Thursday. Southeasterly wiwJs 5 10 15 msll. High this afternoon [r> the middle 70s. Low lorigril in Itie middle SOs. High Thursday near 80. High and low for 24 hours ending 9 71 and S3. Illah and row same date last year: 92 and Sunrise lodoy: sunset Sunrise lomorrow: given up on the old is now moving slowly west- ward. The storm, .continues' to: spread more of itself onto the Cult water's 'near Yucatan I'enninsula and is expected to; pick up slvenglh during the next 12 hours, O'Bryanl: said at a.m. Wednesday. O'Bryant also released last month's weather summary, which showed August to be a cool and rainy Rainfall was the big story with 5.61 inches total from nine rainy days. .Normal for Augusl is 2.05 and lasl year only .30 was recorded. THE MOST RAIN fell oil Ihe 2.89 inches. The rainy days were: 5, 6, 10, 11, 23, 27 and 28, O'Bryant said. The month was also cooler than usual. The overall average was 78.7; normal, 83.G and last year, 82.5 degrees. The average high was 88.7; normal, 95.3 and last year, 94.8. The average low was 68.6; normal, 71.9 and last year, 70.2. The maximum high was 95 on the 18lh compared to a maximum of 103 degrees in 1973. The minimum low was '64 on the lltli compared to a GO last year. THERE WERE more hours -qf sunshine, however, 279.7 of .a possible 370.9 or 68'per cent. Lasl year the percentage was '63.. There were 11 clear eight partly, cloudy days. and 12 cloudy days in August, 1974. Average wind speed was 10.5. Paul Harvey Coming Here Abilene Chamber of Coni- m e r c e officials announced Wednesday that news com- mentator Paul Harvey will speak in Abilene for Hendrick Memorial Hospital's 50th "Birthday Hoff Hardy, chamber presi- dent, said the celebration will begin at Sept. 28 in the Abilene Civic Center. A Program featuring Harv- ey's speech will be followed by refreshments in the build- ing foyer. The event, will be open to the public, he said, and tickets will be ?3. 'High Level7 Talks Said Held on Haig Departure WASHINGTON (A P) There have been "high level discussions" about Alexander M. Haig Jr. leaving his job as IRS 'Amazed' by Tax Variance By ELUE RUCKEIl Q. Is i( possible to find out why the differences in Ihe IRS wilhholdlng tax lable between single and married per- sons? At my particular Income, being sin- gle and having two dependents, my withholding tax Is more than a married person with tbe same income. I have to sipport as, for "no one else is here Io do so. If ene is married, there's a good possibility that two people could bring home pay checks. I've written my congressman and he doesn't know what to do. The IRS office here (old me I was sadly mis- lakei nnrll I insisted (hey look It up afld were they amazed! Now where can I torn to get some- thing it? .A.'You'll think this is a cop-out answer '.'but since Congress makes the law, Con-' gress can change Ilicm. Wrilc every con- gressman you can think of. Other people ire doing it too. Or write Ihe President, He said he'd he a president for "all the people.1' Why the variance in the lax rale? Dan Frizzcll, public affairs assistant for Dallas district of IRS says it's a reflection of the traditional male-female marriage where generally one person is working, one is not. He says this may or may not lie outmoded but it's the way onr society is set up and (he way the tax laws are presently written. Tax rato for unmarried head of house- hold-is usually somewhere between what a single and a married person would pay. Since the tax rale is lower for a married couple, the withholding is lower also. Q. I ordered some pictures from a Magic Valley .Studio in Alamo, Texas, about sK weeks ago. I looked at (he proofs on June 25. I paid for two In advance, and paid on Ihe (bird with' a balance of They were come COD wlrtla 3t days. It's already been St. I have tie cancelled checks. A. And now you have your pictures. The studio claims you looked al proofs June 27, pictures were mailed Aug 7, about 41 days later. The studio says your receipt does say, "Please allow 45 days from date of proof selection." Over 700 families from Abilene ordered from Hie firm; average lime spenl in the mails was 6 or 7 days. Q. I have a garden In my backyard and while squash running out of my cars. M'hal's the best way to freeze It so I can fry and eat It this winter? A ;Sleam blanch the squash whole for three minutes. This means put it in a steam basket above boiling water in a covered pan. Cool in ice water, then slice. Put on a. shallow flat pan in the freezer nnlll firm. Ilcmovc Ihe slices, put in plastic bags, seal and pop back into the freezer. With this method the squash won't slick together, says Home Econo- mist Marlhe Harmon. Q. What's the difference between having a signature notarized and n'av- Ing a signature guaranteed by a bank? How does a person become a notary? A. Bank officer who guarantees a signa- ture, simply guarantees it's the signature of Ihe person who signed Ihe.instrument. A notary public acknowledges that a person appeared in person before him and that thai person acknowledged that he signed the instrument for Ihe puiposes and considerations expressed and thai he has read the instrument and understood what he was signing. In some cases a signature guaranteed by a bank officer wouldn't be a proper substitute for a nalary. For example, in signing a deed to real property or trans- ferring titles. A signature guaranteed by a bank officer is used most often in transfer of stocks and bonds. You must be 16 to become a notary, and must be a resident of the county. Applica- tion forms arc available al Iho county courthouse. Cost is approximately in- cluding fee to a surety company for the bond and to the county for filing (he no- tary bond. Address questions to Action Line, Box Ablknc, Texas Names will not be used hut questions must be signed and addresses listed. Please In- clude telephone numbers It possible. White House chief of staff and reluming to active military .duty, an administration source said today. Meanwhile, the New York Times quoted two authorita- tive administration officials as saying that President Kqrd is expected to appoint Haig as supreme commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- sation and of U.S. forces -in Europe. The Washington Post also said there are growing indica- tions that Haig will soon leave the White Iloiise staff and be recalled to active military duty by tlie President. The Posl said senior govern- ment officials believe the most likely spot for Haig to resume his niililary career would be as commander of one of the main U.S. military commands or as NATO supreme com- mander. A Pcnlagon source said Ihe NATO post would be a logical spot for the former four-star general to resume his military career. Rut the source said he did not know of any plans for Haig to move into lhat job. The death loday of Army Chief of Slnff C reign ton Abrams will mean some re- shuffling of the Army's top c o m m and echelon, which would make.il easier to make a top command post available to Haig. if President Kord chose to do so. Haig rose quickly to four- star rank during Nixon's years in Ihe White House. Haig was a colonel when he became Henry A .Kissinger's clepuly on the While House National Security Council Staff in 1969. He achieved four-star rank early in 1973, when he became deputy chief of staff of the Army. FIND II! A WEEK-ENKR WANTAft IS 3 DATS SAVE S2.QO Additional words- 15: each' No phone orders Cash in advance F Deadline 3 pm Thursday No refundi ABILENt REPORTER-HEWS Q>   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication