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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 29, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 29, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                OR.-WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH.YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 84TH YEAR, NO. ,73 PHONE1'673-4271 Sailors Home From the Sea .Gore, .left, and Dick Sigler, a former Abilenian, are-' shown, talking with newsmen in Honolulu after a Coast Guard cutter picked up'the pair from the Pacific late Wed- nesday. The two men- spent 56 days' drifting across the Pacific in a rubber survival raft. (AP Wirephoto) 9004, THURSDAY EVENING KOUR SECTIONS Price 15 Cents Aiiociated Prett Blast Engulfs Half a Block In Chattanooga Ex-Abilenian to Hawaii Rift Trip Melts Off 51 Pounds By BLUE RUCKER Repairman Chuckles At Poison Gas Tale Q. Before you start laughing, I've heard (his from two different people living In two different places. They said K you hive a color TV set you're supposed to leave II on practically all the lime because it produces some kind of gas. This gas supposedly burns up If Ihe TV Is left on a certain length of lime. True? Do J need to leave the set on all day with Ihe sound turned off just (o get rid of Ihe poison for evening TV viewing? A. We didn't laugh'but Ihe TV repair- men did: They think you believe in witch- crafl it you believe that and ask, "Would Kalph Nader let us market something that produces poison The only place there could ever be any gas, says an expert, is in Ihe picture tube, and it's in a vacuum. The only to leaving your set on constantly is ;it's instanlly warmed-up and ready when you want to watch your favoi'iteV program. If per chance you're thinking of radia-. lion, we understand there is no anything to worry about, that radiation' from a TV set is so minimal it can't be measured. Q. I ordered a -paper shredder 'be- cause I'd-heard shredded newspaper made a good mnlcij for obra especial- ly. Then someone told me that some ink nsed by newspapers was poisonous ID Ihe micro-organisms in the soil. Your paper Is the source of my mulch along wilh McCall's magazine. Does your paper use the kind of Ink that's bail for Ihe soil? A. Not that we've heard. Nobody's done an in-depth study on how The Abilene Re- porter-News affects micro-organisms in the soil or Just which newspaper in the United Slates is' most effectively utilized as an okra mulch. But we do know that newspapers decompose more rapidly Ilian slick paper magazines and our garden expert Paula Carter says if any newsprint is harmful it would be the colored dyes, so stick wilh black and while. If you're still worried put a little compost maker oirlhe ground before the newspapers. It adds extra soil micro-organisms. Q My mother-in-law is confined to a wheelchair. She has tft have a special shoe which Is no longer being made- How could I find someone to make her some shoes using her old ones as a pattern? The man to see is Floyd Naylor of Naylor's Orthopedic Shoes, 902 Van Burcn, Wichita Falls. A local businessman has had excellent luck wilh shoes made by Naylor's firm. Q. Why do people paint Ihelr ,lrcc trunks while? A. To keep away borers. Whitewash dis- courages other insects too, such as anls, of flhis late says garden expert Paula Carter. Q How would i person go about rooting branches from a polnsettla ptant? I got for Christmas, would lite U> have more ttan one plant. A. Root just the lips, or you won't have blooms. Root Tone carries instruction for rooting; follow them, then put Hie tips in a rooting half.sand, half peal moss. Keep moist but not wet or put in a pot and set the pot in a plastic bag in a ligbl window. Leave it alone until it roots. If Ihe plasllc sack condenses loo much, open II for a litlle air. The original plant won'l bloom this year if yon cut the lips All Ibis laic, says Paula carter. A former Abilenian arrived in Honolulu, .Hawaii, Wednes- day, after 56 days on the open sea, and.., wilh a hero's his mother, who still. iiyesj here, said Thursday.; Dick :w i Lh Chuck Gore, set'out from San Fran- cisco July-j in a ,15-foot rail called and hoped to survival kit (he (he age across'the Pacific in Ha- waii. "Medalled me Ihis morning from Ihe-hospital in said Mrs. C-. B. Sigler, of 1331 Grand, "He told me thai he had JosLSL ixjunds, but'was in pretty good shape." .MRS. SIGLER said her son 'also, of a hero's wel- .come-given .Ihem when Ihe IffilDEX 9D Bridge Mirror........... ID Clpssified 5-9D Comics Editorials 4A Horoscope 78 Hasbital- Policnls 2A Obituaries 6A Soorls 1-3C To Your Good Heallh 4B TV Lcq BC TV Scout ___.......... 8C Women's NEWS ;............38 Coast Guard cutter, which had picked (he pair, up HO miles out of ''He sai'd he has ii beard and long hair Mrs. Sigler told (he bul wants to- keep them until he can gel.some pictures." She said he' will probably come to' Abilene in Seplember, and she will have some good home cooking ready for him. "lie told me that all lie tjioughji-jysbout. way chicken Mrs. cream. Era-" Sigler said. "I'm glad it's all over., and hope-. he doesn't gel rany more-. Mrs.-Sigler sai'd her-son lold her .the survival kit, which container! .a--bottle of sugar, a few fish, hooks, a spear and a small plastic still for desalinating, sea water. had worked out "pretty but that (here was roor.; for some improvements. GOI1K, 27, AND SIGLKH, who had been cornmiinicaUng air-- liners by radio during their 56-day voyage, had hoped to continue their. voy- age until they, sighted one ol Ihe 'Hawaiian islands. Bui Ihe Iwo apparently changed their minds; Tuesday and told a .Coast- Guard search plane; by radio that they were ready to be picked. up. The pair said .Ihey :losl .their .emergency food supply only 100 miles offshore' from Cali- fornia when I heir raft- over- turned. They started the voy- nge without -.water, -hoping lo By BYRON DAVIS Associated 1'ress Writer CHATTANOOGA, T c n n. (AF) Half a downtown block was Icfl in (laming rub- ble today aflcr an explosion ripped through a ghetto area leveling night 'spots and a church and injuring at least 13 persons. "If this -had been a weekend, there would have uecn a lot of them killed, "..said Patrolman Don' Welter of the nightspots. "There's no way around it." Police Chief Jerry Pitts said, "There were ho deaths." Bul flames kept fireman and policemen -from entering the building and Pitts said, "After this cools down, we're going lo have lo g'o in and; search. As of now, "2 hav.e everyone ac- counted .V One policeman 'on the site said three bodies were curried from Hie scene, but no liospi- lals or funeral homes reported receiving any dead. Of. the 13 treated tor emergency injuries at Erlangcr. Hospital, only one was admitted. There were 20 'customers at a hcurby restaurant at the lime of the blast and one cus- tomer said many 'of them were burl; "I'm sure thai it. was not a bomb, but I don't know. just exactly what caused Fire Chief "Harry jell said oMhe blast. The four, buildings which Ihe survival kit. Saxbe Doubts Many Draft Dodgers to Accept Offer 'WASHINGTON (A Ally. Gen. William B. Saxbc said today that he doubls many Viclnam-cra draft dodg- ers will return lo the United Stales under President Ford's amnesty .plan. said that some form of amnesty will be of- fered draft evaders and des- erters and he has asked the Justice Department and Ihe Pcnlagon to come up with rec- ommendations for such a pro- gram. Saxbc referring lo his con- tention that amnesty should require al leasl an acknowl- edgment or wrong-doing by the individual said he doubted '71 Takeover by Indians Takes on Permanent Look By J.UIICS A. CAIU.SON Associated -Press Wriler. MfhWAUKEE, Wis. (AP) Indian's who captured'Milwau- kec's old U.S. Coasl Guard station three years, ngo slill stubbornly hold their enclave in a fashionable neighborhood on the Lake Michigan shore- line. Bui Ihey have mixed cmo- lions about the take-over. "It's been a moral victory: lhat docsii'l.mean anything as far as what it is doing for Ihe said Reynold Denny, now a youlh program director for the city's Indian Urban Affairs Council. "It was never our idea lo keep Denny said of (he facility bclwocn coun- ty parklands and the exclusive Milwaukee. Yacht Club. "We wanted lo highlight the lack of facilities in our area." Denny was one of about 30 American Indian Movement members who took over the station's two buildings early on an August morning in 1971, set up barricades and de- clared the sile Indian land. They based Ilicir claim on 100-year-old treaty provisions that abandoned Indian proper- ty' would revert lo the nalive inhabilanls. The Coasl Guard had moved lo new quarters and the federal government had not yet sold Ihe land or sliiflcd conlrol of il lo another 'agency; Law''enforcement officers never-seriously pressured Ihe -Indians to and the Bu- reau of .Indian .Affairs, said .it. is.altcmnti'ig lo gain conlrol of'the'land. The Indians .established, on the base thc-Indian .Communi- ty School, had an en- roll men! of from pro- i-'choalcrs' through children school age during Ihe last academic year. Mosl are bused lo Ihe school from northwest Milwaukee, where mosl of the city's Indians live. The school has been operat- ed wilh the aid of various fed- crargranls, including from the D e-p-a r t-m en l-of and Wel- fare. The 'school's director, Doro- Ihyl.c Ihe Indian education division within HEW's Office of Education was attempting lo gain conlrol of Ihe la.nd Ihrongli Ihe. federal government's General Serv- ices Administration. jshe said such an arrange- ment would allow her school lo operate under a lease and would give Ihe school more stability. many draft-law fugitives would lake advantage of the offer because "they do not waul to make this act of con- Iriticn. They don't want lo have to 'come back and say 'We were Saxbe said in an interview on the NBC-TV "Today Show." As a resiill, he continued, "I don't Ihink we are going to see a great many of Ihem coming back under-any am- nesty program, even [hough the President is determined lo make one thai will open the door lo them." Saxbe said Ford's plan "will make it as easy as il can be bill Ihey arc not going to be welcomed back as heroes." Saxbe repeated his previous proposal for a system requir- ing draft dodgers lo present themselves io a court or lo Selcclive Sen-ice officials as Ihe first condition for return- ing to Ihe Unilcd Slates wilh- oiil proseculion of Ihe charges .agajnsl them.................. Drafl dodger.-; Ihcn couki be lo-gcl a job in some -public service" as the condi- Ucn for amnesly, he added. Discussing the nation's in- creasing crime rale, Saxbe -said: problem is thai we've tried to use gimmicks on crime. Nnne of them have worked very well. We've gol lo..go back to the old concept lhal society doesn't cause crime; criminals cause crime." lie urged'uoli.ce and rjrose- culors to concentrate on ca- reer criminals. Once-the professional crimi- nal is arrested tors should "gel lhal on the front burner, get him before Ihe gel liini.in Saxbe said. WEA1HER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Nolionol Weather Service (Weather Map, P9. 1A) ABILENE AND VICINITY Tlftmile radius) Partly clcudy and mfld wilh lighl chance o[ Ihundersticwflrs to- day, lonioht and Friday. Ughl arvd vari- abfc winds. High thfs aflemoorv and Friday in Ihe mid 80s. Low .lonlqhl in the mid Ms. Probabllily at rain 20 per Irtrouqh Friday. Hlqh crd low lor 24 hours endirxi 9 a.m.': 83 antf.67. H'nh oncf lavs same dole last year: 94 ond 70. S'inrtsc [o nigh I: a 07; sunriie tomorrow: most of those surrounding it, combination of old brick business' and residential tures. The blast -destroyed the Starlight Lounge, the Cactus Club, the St. James Baptist Church and a barber shop. The blast 'occurred in the early morning hours as Weller was making his rounds: "He was on the scene almost im- mediately. was fire everywhere. The buildings were just lev- eled. We jtisl stalled search- ing through the Well- cr said. "We could hear that little boy crying." He referred to a child with his mother found about. -30 feel back into the rubble. They were among at least five per- sons who were rescued -by po- lice, none of whom was be- lieved seriously -hurl. Near the blasl scene, aulos parked in the street were se- 'vcrely damaged by' flying bricks and other debris. A pile of bricks smashed a new Cad- illac down to its wheel hubs. All up and down Ninlh WHERE IT RAINE1 ABILENE Total Municipal Airport .03 Tola! for Year H.47 Normal [or Year 16.37 2041 Butlcrnul 3936 Stale NE Treatment Plant Dycss AFB Lake Abilene lit. .10 .02 .03 1.15 1.70 1.60 Lake Phantom Hill -It Lake Kirby .05 ALBANY 1.23 COLORADO HI EH K Street, a' main artery in the downtown area, store windows were broken. Across the street from the blast, every window was blown from the [ronl of a three-story apartment build- ing, frames and all. llroken liquor hollies from several liquor stores in the area were strewn about. Po- licemen milled about Hie area to keep looters away. The blaze was contained 10 the main blast area, 'which was reduced to splintered brick rubble. Fireman poured heavy streams of water on Ihe fire several hours alter the a.m. explosion. "There were three or four people .scattered in' Ihe street, blown out oiilo Ihe street, blown ouL or carried said Fire'Ll: Herbert Parker, one of the first oh the scene. CIA Said Involved In Thais' Pay By RICHARD BLYSTOiS'E Associated Press Writer BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) Tite U.S. -Central. Intelli- gence.. Agency, has deposited nearly S3. million in Thai tack pay 1 TlVai soldiers soon lo be released from cap- tivity in'Laos, a'govern men I source reported today. The'PathelLao are reported ready lo release some 640 Thai mercenaries and one American civilian .'and the Laos government to free its North Vietnamese prisoners in an exchange scheduled for Sept.19. Nearly. Thai merce- naries recruited, supported and paid by the CIA -fought oiv the royal 'Lao government side before the Laos peace agreement in February 1973. The U.S. Embassy spokes- man in 'Bangkok refused lo confirm or deny the reported compensation plan. He re- ferred queslions lo the Thai" government because it was a matter involving Thai prison- ers. The government made no pf- ficial statement on the fay question. But a government sonrcp. said the CIA has deoos- ited million in two Thai banks and each prisoner would get his monthly salary for time in captivily. One Western diplomatic source said privately that "the Americans believe- they had a duly lo provide some kind of compensation to Ihcse people, and Ihey are doing it." The two Laos sides arc I" exchange prisoner li.sls -18 hours before the scheduled ex- change on the Plain of Jars, Ihe Thai foreign Ministry said. The liberated Thais will be down for debriefing to N'am Phong, an sir base south of Vientiane evacuated "by U.S. Marine fliers a year ago and then to Korat air base northeast of Bangkok for physical checkups. Front May Linger in Area By .JOE DACY.II It'cpo'rlcr-Mcws is'aff Wriler Scattered or widely scat- tered showers and thunder- showers should continue lo dot the Big Country area, al least through Fi-iday.'forccasters'al Ihe National Wcalhcr Service predicted Thursday. Weatherman Frank Cannon said a front, uncertain of its movements, has an upper-lev- el (rough in low selling olf showers throughout the area. The trough of low pressure is lagging behind Ihe surface level fronl by about miles on a line from Wichita [''alls to Kagle Pass, prising just to the easl of Abilene. Since there is very lillle lo push the system on eastward, and since it is partially blocked by the Bermuda High in Ihe Atlantic Ocean, weather condilions may slay about (he same through Friday and pos- sibly through Saturday, Cannon said. THE r.ERMUD.X system has sliiflcd slightly caslvard bul if il should remain steady Ihe local patterns will have lillle reason lo leave the area soon, Cannon said. The forecaster added that Ihe area is slill receiving a generous influx of Gulf mois- lurc, measured by its thick- ness in the atmosphere rather lhan by Ihe amornl. Tfain gauges al Abilene Mu- nicipal Airport received anoth- er .06 inch of rain Thursday morning and Wednesday night bringing the monlhly tolal to 5.G1 inches, and the yearly lo- tal to 1-M7, Cannon saie. Rain reports from the area varied bul there an un- confirmed report of K torren- tial downpour of six inches in the community of Ibex south- east of Albany, Cannon said. ABILENE LAKES ffaincu slightly more water Wednes- day, however, lolalling 150 million in all. Lake Abilene gained anolhcr 20 million, Kirby anolher'30 million and Lake Fort Phan- tom gained 50 million. The Reporter-News .erro- neously reported gains million and 300 mil'.ion gallons for Lake Abilene and Lake Kirby on Wednesday, a bil (i( wishful thinking. -111   

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