Abilene Reporter News, August 24, 1974 : Front Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News August 24, 1974

Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - August 24, 1974, Abilene, Texas Abilene Sporter"WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES"—Byron 94TH 'VEAR, NO. 68 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, SATURDAY MORNING, AUG. 24, 1974—THIRTY-EIGHT PAGES IN FOUR SECTIONS Price 15 Cents Associated Press (ZP) Pet Food Blamed For Higher Food Costs NEW YORK (AP) - The (nod for the nation’s 711 million cats and dogs is of growing concern to some govern men! officials who are are looking for ways to avoid a new round of meat shortages and higher food prices. ‘•Pet food companies have been stealing our precious ca • tie feed by outbidding the fanners and driving the pi ne of feed grain up,” says George Allen, economist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Washington. D.C. “We pay at least five cents more a pound for our meat because of the pet food industry and as much as IO centi a pound in a tight grain market.” Allen, who told a reporter that he spoke only for himself, later denied making the comments and said he had refused Rains Wet Area By ANN FLORES Reporter-New^ Staff Writer A light shower around 2:3d p m. Friday dropped an official .02 inch of rainfall on the Key City, but heavier amounts were recorded to the north of Abilene. The system, which produced heavy, multiple-inch rains in the Panhandle and* Big Bond area, remained to the west of Abilene Friday, according to the National Weather Service but may drift into the Abilene area early Saturday. Friday’s rain brought the total rainfall for the year in Abilene to 11.52 inches, down from the normal total of 15.99. On the northern edge of the Big Country, Rule recorded .65 inch and Goree .45 inch Friday. Seymour reported heavy rainfall beginning a' 8:45 p.m. with some hail falling on the outskirts of town. ported light rainfall. Rotan and Haskell also re-To the southeast of Abilene, Comanche reported .16 inch of precipitation along with light hail and Goldthwaite reported an evening thunderstorm. Forecaster Darrell Crawford of the National Weather Service in Abilene said the chances of weekend rain are about 30 per cent Saturday. 1*30 rain tm “We still stand a pretty good chance of getting some rain after midnight but if we dont’ get any during the day Saturday, our chances will taper off,” he said. Prospect of rain Saturday night, he said, is is 20 per cent, with Sunday’s forecast calling for generally fair skies. to make estimates on costs added by pet food demand. Agriculture Secretary Earl L. Bulz. however, has contended that those who would increase world food supplies by reducing Americans’ consumption -could make the inst onslaught on this noble goal bv reducing our dog and cat population by 50 poi cent. which likewise would suddenly release more grain for the world.” But*, in a speech Friday in Indianapolis, reiterated that statement and his original disclaimer when he fir;,! raised the controversial point. “I do See PET, Pf. I2A, Col. I Market Drops Below 700 More Details. Pg. 7C NEW YORK (AP)— The Dow Jones industrial average, a leading indicator of performance on the New York Stock Exchange, slid 17.83 points Friday to 686.80 —- its first close under 700 since July 9, 1970. It was also the biggest one-day drop in the blue chip barometer in nearly seven weeks. The main selling targets continued to be big-name glamour issues, which one , analyst now calls “former glamours.” Rockefeller Says Nixon Shouldn't Be Prosecuted SEAL HARBOR, Maine (AP) — Vice President-designate Nelson A. Rockefeller said Friday “the tone and mood of the country” is that former President Richard M. Nixon should not face criminal prosecution in the Watergate case. Rockefeller endorsed a statement by Senate Republican Leader Hugh Scott, who said two days after Nixon's resignation that he should face no further action. In two news conferences at his vacation home here, Rock- Inside Today Watergate Files Opened to Nixon Aides White House officials decide to iet former Nixon aides exomine their files to prepare for the Watergate cover-up trial. Pa. 10A. Amusements Astro-ereph . Bridie ..... Church News Classified . . Comics .... Editorials . . . Farm ...... ...... SI Market* ......... .....4, 7C ......10A Obituaries ...... ........ID ......10A Oil ............. .......41 ------ ID Sparta........... 1-S, IC .....2-10 Today in History . . . ......10A .4. TI TV Lot .......... --------SB ..... 4A TV Scant SB .....UA Woman Nows ..... .....2, 31 Traces of life ...and West Tex as wind efeiler said he thought Scott's was a very good expression, but declined to elaborate on his own views about prosecution. “I don’t know about' the legal arguments,” the former New York governor said at the second of those sessions. At the first news conference, Rockefeller was asked whether he would support amnesty for Nixon. He replied by citing Scott’s Aug. ll statement. Scott said then that most congressional leaders “would wish that nothing further happens to former President Nixon ... “Everyone hopes we can say enough is enough,” Scott said. “This is the end. There has been a pound of flesh. Hanging is enough without drawing and quartering.” After quoting part of the Scott statement. Rockefeller said: “I thought it was a very good expression.” He also said. “It doesn’t seem to me, as he said, that he (Nixon) should in addition A chimney, a windmill, a telephone pole ... all stand as monuments of a sort to man’s industry and lo Ins transience. This abandoned homestead is r 14 miles west of Breckenridge off U.S. 180. (Staff Photo by Bob Campbell) Ix* drawn and quartered.” Later in the day. Rockefeller held a second news conference for newsmen who had not been on hand at the first. Asked directly whether he personally opposed prosecution of Nixon. Rockefeller said. “I don’t know about the legal arguments,” and again quoted Scott. He said the Scott statement “reflected the mood and the atmosphere of the Congress and the American people.” He disclosed that, although he has known President Ford for years, “the first time I sat down and talked to him” was a year ago when he urged the then House Republican leader to join his Commission on Critical Choices. “He was the most enthusiastic supporter of this in the Congress,” Rockefeller said. A number of the questions at the news conferences dealt with whether his nomination for the vacant vice presidency meant an end to his lorn* quest for the presidency, barring any unexpected happening. He called such speculation “totally irrelevant” and said See ROCKEFELLER, Pg. 114. Lei. I Kissinger Soys U.S. Opposes Splitting Cyprus WASHINGTON (AP) - A Greek-American delegation said Friday that Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger told them the United States opposed the partition of Cyprus. After a 70-minute meeting at the State Department, spokesmen told newsmen that Kissinger “said the United States is in favor of a single, sovereign, autonomous state in Cyprus.” Kissinger sent Jack B. Ku * bisch. the U.S. ambassador designate to Greece, to Boston where AHEPA, the Greek-Amenean group holding its annual convention, has passed resolutions sharply critical of U.S. policy and accusing the department of a pro-Turkev tilt "We told the Secretary of State that we as Americans were deeply concerned,” said George Douris. of New York City, acting as spokesman blithe group. “Ile strongly Mated that the State Department did not have a pro-Turkey policy,” said Douris. “The secretary told us he'd do everything possible to bring about a solution consistent with Greek honor and Greek national dignity.” While the United States has never taken a position favoring partition department officials have publicly endorsed “a greater degree of autonomy” tor the Turkish Cypriot minority on Cyprus. Another delegate. Peter Bell, of Worcester, Mass., -aid “we have no reason to doubt his sincerity in trying to find a solution’’ to tile Cyprus prod lent. But Bell, a former presi dent of the American Hellenic Educational and Professional Association, added: “We’re going to wait to see what the actual results are as time goes on.” Earlier in the day, a State Department spokesman said the U.S. government was not considering a shift in North Atlantic Treaty Organization defenses from Greece to Turkey. “We consider Greece an important and valuable member of the alliance and we are not thinking of any alternative means of protecting its south em Hank,” said spokesman Robert Anderson. His remarks were in response to questions about a published report quoting FYe-mier Bulent Eeevit of Turkey as saying his courtly could compensate for any weakne.-is-es in U.S. defenses in the Med iterranean caused by Greece’'* military withdrawal from NATO. Anderson expressed enthusiastic support of U.N. Secretary General Hurt Waldheim’s plans to visit Cyprus thi< weekend for talks with leaders of the Greek and Turkish C\p-riot communities. “We think that’s an excel lent idea.” Anderson said. “We are not aware he ha* any negotiating plans, but if he did have some ideas --which we are not aware of we would be re-ponsive to them.'’ Anderson said. “We feel the sooner necotia Dons begin, the better.” Anderson said. “The longer one waits the more likely a party w ill tardea its position.''ENJOYING HERSELF IN ROCKER . . . Mrs. Marshall will be 93 Sunday94-Year-Old Merkel Tourist Ready to Dance By LIZ MOORE Reporter-News Staff Writer MERKEL — Sporting gay, red dangling earrings, Mrs. Rilla Marshall just kinda’ relaxed with her feet up most of the time Thursday in her pink frame home in Merkel. After all, you can’t expect a body to simply bounce right back to work’the day after returning from a whirlwind summa: vacation. The red earrings danced as Mrs. Marshall, who will be 95 on Sunday, recounted her two week adventure on a bus trip up and down the West Coast. “She’s kind of tired after all this but she had wanted to go so bad,” explained her daughter, Mrs. Tressie Lucas, who lives with her and was a traveling companion along with another daughter, Mrs. Violet Smith. “I THOUGHT if it’d make her happy, it’d make us happy,” she said. After all, Mrs. Marshall added, “idle minds is the devil’s workshop!” So the three of them were off like a shot to Tacoma, Wash., to visit Mrs. Marshall’s sister who is 78. They all had a good time, but only Mrs. Marshall can boast of sleeping in a water bed, cruising on a ship, and circling on foot the entire Mormon Temple Square in Salt Lake City. And of course, there was that sailor in the Bremerton Naval Yard... “I caught me a feller, but I couldn’t hold him,” Mrs. Marshall laughed. At least, though, he posed with his arm around her for a snapshot. Then he walked her down the gang plank. “I SURE DID like him,” Mrs. Marshall chuckled. Only one bad thing happened on the trip which slowed her down a little. She fell while visiting in Washington, and although a doctor found no broken bones after checking her ■ over in a hospital, she had to be escorted around in a wheel chair for a while. “After Mother fell, she looked up and said, ‘Well, do you think I won’t get to go to Canada now?’ ” Mrs. Lucas said. Of course, she’d go to Canada. The women went to Santa Cruz. Calif., to visit an uncle before coming home. It was in a Santa Cruz motel that Mrs. Marshall slept in the water bed. She liked that just fine, too. “There just aren’t too many places or things or people that Mother doesn't like,” Mrs. Lucas said. Finally, after the spectacular gardens of the Northwest, after viewing the Parliament buildings in Victoria and all those other exotic sights, the women had to return to Merkel where Mrs. Marshall has lived all her life. Besides, she had to get back to make sure she would still have her ironing customers. She worried about that. “MOTHER IRONS for three or fourStaff Photos By John Best families a week, pretty near eight hours a day,” Mrs. Lucas explained. “She had to turn one of the ladies down this week while she recuperates a little and she was worried she wouldn’t bring the ironing back!” There is also her quilting. Mrs. Lucas showed a fantastic piece crocheted in twine that her mother has nearly finished. In order to get all this done, Mrs. Marshall rises early — she gets her daughter up at 4:30 a m. every morning. “I ain’t going to tell you that I go back to bed,” Mrs. Marshall confided. She also said she s going on another trip some day — “if I keep a-kickin.” There will be a birthday party from 2:30 to 4 p.m. Sunday in tile home of Mrs. Marshall’s grandson. Billy Lucas. She has a party every year. “WHY, SHE MAY even dance a lit-tie,” Mrs. Lucas said. Mrs. Marshall's friends and some of her relatives — she has 13 grandchildren, 29 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren — are expected to be there. Mrs. Marshall has already done some celebrating. Twice she was served surprise birthday treats in restaurants on the trip. Once a waitress brought out a cake with a single candle and another time there was a dish of ice cream with a sparkler in the middle. That sparkler was especially appropriate — it seems to represent Mrs. Marshall’s style. *I caught me a feller, but I couldn't hold him ...I sure did like him! -Mrs. Rilla Marshall ;

  • Ann Flores
  • Billy Lucas
  • Bulent Eeevit
  • Darrell Crawford
  • Earl L. Bulz
  • George Allen
  • George Douris
  • Henry A. Kissinger
  • Hugh Scott
  • Jack B. Ku
  • John Best
  • Liz Moore
  • Nelson A. Rockefeller
  • Peter Bell
  • Richard M. Nixon
  • Rilla Marshall
  • Robert Anderson
  • See Rockefeller
  • Tressie Lucas
  • Violet Smith

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date: August 24, 1974

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