Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 24, 1974 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 24, 1974, Abilene, Texas                               WITH OFFENSE TO OR FOES WE SKETCH WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 94-Year-Old Merkel Tourist Ready to Dance FNJOYING HfRSELI IN ROCKtK Mrs Marshall be 95 Sunday Pet Food Blamed For Higher Food Costs By UZ MOO RE Reporter-News Slatt Writer MEHKEL-- Sporting red dan- gling earrings, Mrs. Rilla Marshal! just Itindat relaxed wild her feet up jiiosfof Thursday in her pink frame home in .Merkel. After can't expect a body to' simply bounce right back to work the day after returning from a whirlwind summer-vacation.- The red earrings danced as Mrs. who will be 95 on Sunday, recounted her week adventure'on a bus trip up and down tjie Coast. "She's kind of tired after .all this but she had wanted so plained her daughter, Mrs. Tressie Lu- cas, who lives tier and was a (raveling with anoth- er daughter, Violet Smith. "I THOUGHT if it'd make her happy, it'd make us she said. After all, Mrs. Marshall added, "idle minds i.s.lhe devil's So the three of them were off like a shot to 'Tac.Dina, Wash., to visit Mrs. Marshall's sister wtio is 78. They all liad a good tune, but only Mrs. Marshall can boast of sleeping in a water bed, .cruising on a ship, and circling on foot .the entire Mormon Temple Square in Salt Lake City. And of course, there was .that sailor in the Bremerton Naval Yard. "I caught me a feller, but I couldn't hold Mrs. Marshall-laughed. At least, though, he posed.with his arm around her for a snapshot. Then he walked her down Ihe gang plank. "I SURE DID like Mai- shall chuckled. one bad thing happened on (lie trip which slowed her down a lifjlc i'ic fell-while visiting in and although a doctor found no broken bones-after checking her-over in a hospital, she had lo be escorted around :.Jn a H'hee) chair for a while. "After Mother fell, she looked up and said, 'Well, do you think f won't get lo go .to Canada Mrs. Lucas said. Of course, she'd go to Canada. 'Hie women went to Santa Cruz, Cal: if., to visit an uncle.before coining home. It was in a Santa Gruz motel that-Mrs. Marshall slept in the water bed. She liked that just fine, loo. "There just aren't too many places or things or people that Mother doesn't Mrs. Lucas said. Finally, after the spectacular gar- dens of Ihe Northwest, after viewing the parliament buildings in Victoria and all those other exotic sights, the women had to return to Merkel where Mrs. Marshall has lived all her life. Besides, she had.to get back lo make sure she would still have her ironing customers. She worried about thai. "MOTHER IRON'S tor three or four Staff Photos By John Best families a week, prelly near eight hours a Mrs. Lucas explained. "She liad to (urn one of the ladies down this week she recuperates a litllo find she worried she wouldn't bring ironing There is also her quilling. Mrs. Lucas showed a fantastic piece crocheted in twine-that her mother'has nearly fin- ished. in order to get all this done, Mrs. Marshall rises early she gels her (la'ugliler up at a.m. every mora- 'I ain't going lo tell you thai I go b.ack io .Mrs. .Marshall confided. She also said she's going on another trip some day "if I keep a-Wckin." .There will be a birthday party from 4 p.m. Sunday in the home of Mrs.'Marshall's grandson, Billy Lucas. She lias a parly eveiy year. "WHY, SIIE MAY even dance a lit- Mrs. Lucas said. Mrs. Marshall's friends and'some of her' relatives she has 13 grandchil- dren, 29 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren are ex- pected la be there. Mrs. Marshall has already done some celebraling. Twice she was served sur- prise birthday treats in restaurants on (he (rip. Once a waitress brought out a cake with a single candle and another, time (here was a dish of ice cream with a sparkler in the middle. That sparkler was especially appro- priate it seems lo represent Mrs. Marshall's style. caught me a feller, but I couldn't hold him sure did like -Mrs. Rilla Marshall] YORK (AP) Ihe tot (he nations id million and dogs'ib of growing concern to some government officials who are aie lookm" waja to a new round .of meal shortages and higher' food prices. "Pel food companies have been stealing ourprecious eai- by outbidding (he ffirmers anil driving the price nf feed .grain says George Allen, economist 'for Ihe Department of Agri- .'culture in Washington, D.c. pay'at least five cents :more a pound for our meat because of the pet food Indus- Iry and as much as 10 cents a .pound in a tight grain mar- Allen, who told a reporter thai he spoke only for himself liilcr denied making the com- menls and said he had refused Rains WetArea i.ByANNFLORKS Reporter-News Staff A light shower-around p.m. Friday dropped an offi- cial .02 inch of'raiiifall Key City, but heavier were recorded lo Ihe north of Abilene. The system, which produced rains in the Panhandle and'Big Bend remained lo the west of Abilene Friday, according to Ihe National Weather Scrvire Bill iriay drift inlo Ihe .Abilene area early Saturday. Friday's rain brought the lo- lal rainfall for the year in Ahi- ,5etie to 11.52 inches, down 'from Ihe normal loial of 15.9J. On Uie northern edge of ilie Big Country, Tiule recorded '.63 inch and Goree .45 inch Friday. Seymour reported heavy rainfall beginning at p.m. with some hail fall- ing outskirts of town. ported ligh I rainfall. Kplan and Haskeiralso re- To the southeast of Abilene, Comanche reported .16 inch of precipitation along.with lighl hail and Goldthwaile reported an evening thunderstorm. Forecaster Darrcll Craw- ford of the National Wealher Service in Abilene said the chances of weekend rain are about 30 per cent Saturday. 3-36 rain tm "We still stand a prelly good 'diance of gelling sonic rain after midnight but if we dont' get any during Ihe day Saturday, our chances will ta- per he said. Prospect of rain Saturday he said, is is 20 per cent, wilh Sunday's forecast calling for generally fair skies. lo make estimates on-cosls idded pet food denund Seuehij Mil I liutz Ins con tended tint those who would mueaie woild food supplies reducing Americana con sumption "could make Ihe first onslaught on 'this noble ioil ty icdticmg OKI dogdiid population bj 50 pei cent whith liXewi'L would suddenly ictcise moie giam for Ihe world. Uulz in a speech in .Indianapolis reiteialed thai si ilemcnt and his ongmal dis thinner when he firt uised Hie poml I do Sec 1'KT, Pg, i Market Drops P BeJow70a j More Details, Pg. 70 I NEW YORK The Dow Jones iridus- trial jng indicator formaiiceron the a i York Stock 'Exchange, slid 17.83 points Fn day to 686.80 its "A fnst close under 700 5 since July 9, 1970... It was also the big-1 gest ojie-day tirop in, p the blue chip bare meter in nearly seven -I The'mam'.sell I ing targets continued ft lo be big-name glam- J. our issues, which one I i analyst mer glamours." Rockefeller Says Nixon Shouldn't Be Prosecuted HARBOR, Maine (AP) Vice President desig nate Nelson .A. Rockefeller said Friday "the tone and mood of the country" is that former President Richard M. Nixon should not face criminal piosecution in the Watergate case. Rockefeller endoised a statement by Senate Jtepubli- can Leader Hugh Scott, who said two after" resignation that he should face no further action. In two news conferences at his vacation home here, Rock- Inside Todoy Watergate Files Opened to Nixon Aides White House officials de- cide to let former Nixon aides examine their- files to prepare for the Water- gate cover-up trial. Pg. i OA. .Amusements Astro-graph Bridge Church .Ncwi ClotsifitiJ Comic's Editorials Fam ......51 1OA ...9D ...-4A Ma'rkttj 7c Mitudrici' -Oi< Soorts 1.5 JQ in History .JOA TV.Uj SB TV Sc.ut efcllei said he thought htott s ivas a good expression, but declined lo elaborate on his own views about prosecu lion. "I don't Xnoiv about the le gal -the former New York governor said at Ihe second of those sessions. U Hie first news conference, Rockefeller was asked wheth er hp would support anmesl) for Nixon He replied by tiling itolt's Au? 11 statement Scott said then that mobt congressional leaders "would wish thai nothing further hap- pens (o former President Nix- on "Everyone hopes we can say enough is Scoll said. "This is the end. There has been a pound of flesh. Hanging is enough without drawing and quartering." After quoting part of Ihe Scolt statement, .Rockefeller said: "I thought it was a very- good expression." He also .said, "It .doesn't seem to me, as he said, that he (Nixon) should in addition be drawn and quartered." Later in tha day, Rockefel- ler held a second news confer- ence for; newsmen who had nol'been on hand at the first; Asked directly whether he per- sonally opposed proseculion of Nixon, Rockefeller said, don't know about (he legal ar- and again quoted Scott.- He said the Scolt statement' "reflected the mood and the atmosphere of the Congress and the American people." He disclosed lhal, although he has known President Ford for years, "the first time I sat down and talked lo him" was a year ago when he uiged the then House Republican leader to join his Commission: on Crilical Choices. "lie was Ihe most enthusias- tic supporter of (his in the 1 A number. bMfie questions at the news conferences dealt with whether- his. nomination' for the vacant vice presidency meant an end to his long quest for Ihe presidency, barring- any unexpected happening, He called such speculalion "totally irrelevant" and said': See ROC.KEPKLLER, Pg. 12A, Col. 1. Kissinger Says U.S. Opposes Splitting Cyprus Traces of life. ...and West Texas wind A a windmill, a telephone note all slant! as monuments of. a sort to man's induslrv'and t" transience. This abandoned homestead is to his Bob" Breckmidge otf U'S' 180' (Staff Photo by WASHINGTON (AP) .-A Greek-American delegation said Friday that Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger (old them the United States op- posed the partition of Cyprus. Aflcr a 70-minule meeting at the Stale Deparlment, spokes- men told newsmen that Kissin- ger "said the United States is in favor of a single, sovereign, autonomous state in Cyprus." Kissinger sent Jack B. Ku- bisch, the U.S. ambassador de- signate lo Greece, lo Boston where AHEPA, the Greek- American group holding ils annual convention, has passed resolutions sharply critical of U.S. policy arid accusing the department of a pro-Turkey lilt. (old ihe Secretary of State that we as Americans were deeply said George pouris. of New York Cily, acting as spokesman for the group. "He strongly slated lhat Ihe State Department did not have a pro-Turkey said "The secretary told us he'd do everything possible lo bring about a solution consist- ent with Greek honor and Greek national dignity." the United States has Mver taken a position favor- ing partition department offi- cials hare publicly endorsed "a greater degree of autono- my" for Ihe Turkish Cypriol minority on Cyprus. Another delegate. Peter Bell, of Worcester. Mass., said have no reason to doubt his sincerity in trying to find a solution" to (he Cyprus prob- lem. But Bell, a former presi- denfof ihe American Hellenic Educational aiid "Professional added: "We're going la wait to see what the actual results are as lime goes on." Earlier in Ihe day, a Slate Department spokesman saiti the U.s: government was not considering a shift in North Atlantic -Treaty Organization defenses from Greece lo Tur- key. consider Greece an im- porlant and valuable member of the alliance and we are not thinking of any alternative means of prole cling its south- ern said spokesman Robert Anderson. His remarks wfre in re- sponse to questions aboul published report quoling Pre- mier BOlcnl Ecevil of Turkey as saying his counliy could compensate for any weakness- es in U.S. defenses in the Med- iterranean caused by Greece's military (rithdrawa! from NATO. Anderson expressed enthu- siastic support of U.N. Secre- tary General Kurt Waldheim's plans to visit Cyprus this weekend for talks with leaders of the Greek and Turkish Cyp- riol communities. ''We lliink that's an excel- lent Anderson said. "We are not aware he has any negotiating plans, but if he did have some ideas which we arc not aware of we-would, be responsive lo Anderson said. "We feel the sooner negotia- tions begin, the An- derson said. 'The longer one wails ihe more likely a party will iardea ils position.''   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication