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Abilene Reporter News: Monday, August 19, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 19, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE to FRIENDS OR.FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 94TH YEAR, NO 63 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY 19, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Price 15 Cents Press (JPI Next Stop: the Links President Ford stops to talk with newsmen outside his Alexandria, Va., home before being driven to the Burning Tree Golf Course for a round of golf Sunday afternoon. NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) U.S. "Ambassador liodger P. Davics was killed today when a mob of .Greek Cypriols at- tacked the American Embassy. in Nicosia, Cypriot- President Glafcos Clcrides announced. After visiting the embassy himself, Cleridcs announced Davies' death over Cyprus ra- dio.; this terrible :erime against Cyprus in the -strongest terms and express my deepest sorrow and sym- he said. Aboard President Ford's Air Force One plane on a flight from Washington to' Chicago, White House Press Secretary Gerald F. terllorsl gave news- men a statement saying: "The President was shocked and deeply saddened by the death of Ambassador Davies in Nicosia today. -This tragic incident emphasizes the ur- gent need for the end to Ihe violence on Cyprus and an im- mediate-return to negotiations for a peaceful settlement." Tcrllorst said Ford talked with Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger at the White House before departing for Chicago. U.S. Marines and Cypriot firemen carried Davies' body out on a stretcher, his white shirt stained with blond. .Gunshots were still cracking in the embassy doorway near derides, who stood next to the stretcher facing the screaming mob. Officials said a Cypriol woman working in the embas- sy was also lulled and two olh- By ELIJt RUCKEH Vote Still Out On PatHbtic Fire Plugs Q. Maybe what we need in Abilene, Instead of "yukky fireplugs are deco- rated ones. In South Bend, Indiana they have patrlolic plugs painled (o resemble revolutionary Franklin, Washington, (he black revo- lutionary hero Crispus Attucks and -10 !others. Can you get Asst. Clly Manager -John Halchcl (o think in terms of a campaign to decorate our ugly lire- plugs? A. We can try. We mailed him your pic-lures and asked him to forward them to our Chamber of Commerce General Manager. They do look pretty nifty and definilely different. We figured "lack of money" might be mentioned and sure enough Ilalcnel said his first impulse is that it might be a mainlenancc problem. Bui he didn'l say "no." Sounds like a fun project for art classes and budding arlists in our fair city. Q Our Elberta peaches are so dis- eased with all lhal jelled wax stuff. Everyone ot them is half ruined with worms. What do we spray next year and when? A. Sevin, Malathion or a similar safe insecticide. You're lighting insects, nol disease. Spray first at the "pink-bud stage" just before it blooms. Spray again when Ihe petals fall. Spray once more Ihree weeks later. (I. ffhal's (he minimum dally adull requiremen( for copper? If it is nol known, (hen would.three milligrams daily be dangerous to lake? A Two milligrams per day is sufficient Id maintain Ihe copper balance in the body, says Dietician Milla Perry. An ordi- nary'diel contains approximately two to five milligrams per day so you don't real- ly need the extra copper although it won t harm you. Miss Perry says liver, kidney, nuts, shellfish, raisins and dried legumes arc rich dielary sources of copper. She suggesls eating more of those in place of tablets Of pills. 0. lias anyone figured out Plas- ter of Paris got lhal name? A It was first made from gypsum thai came from Montmarlre, a district of Par- is The section was a haven for artists wiio used it in molding and artwork as far back as medieval days. Q The. family's 20-year-old grand- falher clock is in [ailing health. .But other lhan "Tcmpus his idcr.li- ficallon consists of in Ger- and a broken part. He alely neerls a part transplant. No one remembers where we bought him. Do you know of any good grandfather clock part surgeons In town? A Sure enough. Jeweler and clock re- pair expert Buddy Bcnnelt maintains his operating room at 3512 N. 6th. Drop by or just call him and describe the symptoms. He'll sec il he can't supply your friend's missing parts and put liim back logclher again. Address questions lo Aclion Line, Bov Abilene, Texas Names will not he used hut questions must he signed and addresses given. Please Include telephone numbers If possible. Inflation Task Force Okay Congress Tbdajf WASHINGTON (AP) One week after President Ford rc- qucslcd legislation creating an inflation-monitoring task force, Congress .is nearing passage of the bill. Both the House and Senate have set floor action on Ihe bill for loday and it is expect- ed that congressional aelion will be completed (luring the day. Democrats and many lie- publicans are. skeptical whelh- cr the proposed Cost of Living Task Force, which would not have any enforcement power, could lower the nation's infla- tion rale. However, in Lhe spirit of conciliation with the new Pre- sident, they say (hey are will- ing to give him the legislation he asked for in a speech to Congress last Monday. Also (oday, Ihe House re- sumes debate on a 520 billion, six-year mass transit bill which Ford says he wants cut sharply. Hep. John 11. Ilousselot, a conservative California lie- publican who believes budget cuts would do more lhan any task force could to curtail in- flation, recalled that Congress had balked at giving former President Richard M. Nixon similar aulhority last spring- He then added: "Why this change now? It Is because we have a new Presi- dent and we are anxious to support him But this.does not make an idea any belter lhan it was when it-was re- jeclcd four months ago." The lask force has about 25 staffers and the policy would Convict's Widow Seriously Wounded SAN ANTONIO, Tex. (AP) Police soughl wilncsses to- day in the serious wounding outside a bar of Theresa Dom- ingucz, widow of one of Iwo convicts slain Aug. 3 during a thwarted prison break al llunlsville. Police said Mrs. Dominugez, shot twice early Sunday with a small caliber weapon, was in poor condition today. Detectives said Mrs. Domin- gucz, 24, argued early Sunday with a relalivc at the bar where she was employed. Po- lice said the argument cen- tered around Mrs. Domingucz' five children. Officers said Mrs. Domin- giinz and the relalivc carried their quaiTel across the street In n vacant service station where Mrs. DomingMez was found a short lime later, wounded in Ihe chest and stomach. Police questioned the rela- livc Sunday but said they were unable to learn many de- tails of the shooting. No NEWS INDEX Amuiemenls 8C Busincss'Mirror.......... 11A briooc................. -4B Comics................. 6B Editorials 4A Horoscope 5B Hospital Policnls 2A Obituaries............. IOA Soorts 1-3C To Your Gxx) Hcollh......50 TV Loo 8C TV Scout 8C Women's News 2-3B charges were filed against anyone, police said. Mrs. Domingncz' husband, "Rudrjlfo, 27, was killed with another convict, Fred Gomez Carrasco, during a Shootout with prison guards as the two convicts and another inmate tried to end an 11-day standoff by escaping with a dozen hos- tages. The third inmate, Igna- cio Cuevas, was captured un- harmed. Two women hostages were slain in Ihe fflinbatlle. bo directed by a coalilion of Ihe President's economic ad- visers. These would include the secretaries of treasury, agriculture, commerce and la- bor. The House is expected to wrap up action, on the mass transit bill, which would pro- vide operating subsidies for the first time as well as granls for buying equipment. Ford supports GOP congres- lo billion but Democrats hope to hold the line al billion During the weekend, the American Automobile Associa- tion said the bill contains a litllc-noliced provision which would expand.the weight lim- its of trucks allowed on inter- stale highways to pounds, something Ihe AAA said the' trucking industry has sought to gel in a six-year lobbying drive. They said it would endanger motorists, .put more stress on "the nation's already critical- ly deficient bridges and cost the slates between nillion and million annually to repair truck-caused damage." WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NBtiDnaf Wwttiftr Service (Wenttitr Map, q. 2A) ABILEHE AMO VICINITY (10-raIIe radius) Clear lo parity trotidy wllrt litlJe change in temperatures hrouph Southerly winds t to 18 mph. High this alternonn end Tuesday ID mld-Ws. Lo.v {wntghl In low 70s. Higrt and lo.v lor 24 houri ending 9 a.m.: 95 and 71. HlgTi and lavs some dale loif ytar; 94 and 67. Sunrise lotfay: sunset tonight: Sunrise lornarrov: AP Wtrepholo RODGER. P.: DAVIES .viclim of Cypriot mob er employes.. were wounded vyhen rioters sldrnied the -en-story building in a burst of gunfire, smoke and tear gas. ;''derides said in his radio.au- nouncement, that Cypriol po- lice had been unable to comroi the mob. Witnesses said some of the shots, at (lie embassy were fired by- persons wearing the distinctive berets and camou- flage fatigues of EOKA-B, the Greek Cypripl guerrilla group seeking Enosis, or union with Greece. The riot began with an anti-American demonstration, as more lhan Greek Cypriots. marched on the em- bassy with banners. "Kissinger is a "Shame to the "America will the ban- 'lifers'read.'The crowd chanted similar -slogans, :furious over Ihe -Turkish army's unan- swered assault on Cyprus'and convinced thai the United Slates had' supported! Turkey in last week's war. The1 ambassador's ear, standing on Hie strecl outside The embassy, was set ablaze, anil burst like a bomb when ihe flames readied Its: gas lank. A cluster'of young men Ihen stormed the black iron gales of Ihe embassy and ripped them open; five yards from (he entrance of the building. The residence is a penthouse on the roof. Burst.1; of gunlire Flared as the demonstrators ran lo the building. U.S. Marine guards tried, to drive back Ihe mob with tear gas, and many tied. U.N. troops in armored cars raced to (he scene alter Ihe car exploded but they drove off immediately, apparently deciding that the dcmonstra- t Ion was not U.K. business.' Davics, 53, officially look up, the Cyprus- post on July 10, only five days before the coup by the Greek-led. Cypriot na- tional guard deposed Presi- dent Miikarios. On July 20, Turkey launched the invasion that kindled passionate anti- American feeling on -tlie is- land. Davies, a widower and father of two children, maintained a. residence at Berkeley, Calif. Many Cypriots believed the American CIA helped over- throw Makarios. Hundreds of Greek Cypriot men and woinen living near the embassy watched from 'their windows and balconies, cheering as Ihe .ambassador's car burst into smoke and flames. One girl danced in L It e "This will show Kissinger, the as. the smoke billowed. derides was in the middle of a.news conference when the riot began. He brote'off the, conference: arid raceCtolheiembasgy. Asked -by conference whether he sharccl the widspread anti-American feelings in Cyprus, he said: "I-. believe, the U.S. could have exerted more effective pros- siire to prevent, the Turkish of Cyprus. "II is, however a fact which I cannot deny; that after 'the invasion of Cyprus, particular- ly since the period.of the fail- ure.of Ihe Geneva.talks and paTlicularly'sineC; the advance of- -the Turkish'-forces, ;the U.S.A. did exercise great prcs- sure forces and Turkey to bring: (heir advance lo a The "embassy consul, David Bowe, said laler llterc were" about-10'embassy officers imd seven or. cighl local employes' inside the enVbassy when it was attacked: "We' were with' the ambassa- dor in a corridor on Ihe sec- ond floor. We were huddling there. .We were concerned about whether We were going to make Uowc said. "Then a shot 'came straight down .the. corridor, and killed the.ambassador. "A Greek Cypriot'girl also was killed and an elderly Cyp- riot man had a heart attack, lie is in serious coiulition." Some Pupils Face Several Hot Days Abilene school children will apparently'-face several days of warm- temperatures in most ot 'AbUeiie's .31 schools since'ilie.System's air condi- tioning project may not be completely finished until next summer. "We haven't received all, Ihe bids said, former Supl. A.E. Wells, who is coordinal- ing the work. "Some, of "the work can be done while school is in he added. About a third of the schools arc air conditioned, however, so some students will escape the 95-dcgree temperatures predicted by the National Weather Service. School slarls Tuesday. FORECASTER W. KCK said Monday.thai forecast "sounds indicating warm days with no chances ot raiii 'at -feast '-tWo'ugh.'Thurs- day. An upper-level high pressure system feet fe.exuccl- e'd 'quash precipitation unlil .it moves easlwarrj, 'as it is expected to Thursday, Eck said. Abilene is still officially 4.25 inches short of Ihe normal; e.v- peeled rainfall accumulating Ihrpugh Monday of 15.75 inch- es. However, for August, at least, rainfall was. .59 inch above [he monthly normal- of 2.05 inches. ressman Ex- Head of Veterans' By FRANCIS LEWINI3 Associated Press Writer CHICAGO (AP) President Kord loday nanied his "per- sonal; friend and former congressional colleague" Richard I. lioudcbush of Indi- ana to be Ihe new administra- tor of Veterans Affairs. Ford promised to see that .veterans are "not just a digit in a computer syslem lhal sometimes goofs." He warned, however, that with America "fighting for its economic he- would iiot hesitate to veto any bill, in- cluding the pending veterans education bill lo control "in- flalinary excesses." "Lain open to conciliation and compromise on Hie total amount authorized so that we can protect veteran trainees against Ihe rising cost of liv- the President said. Ford, making Ihe first trip in his new presidency, came to Chicago to address (he Vain annual convenlion of Ihe Vet- erans of Foreign Wars at the fntematinal Ballroom of Ihe Conrad Hilton Hotel.. He spoke, lo lliciti as a fel- low veteran havins served in Ihe Navy in World War 11 pledging to work for more jobs for veterans, belter hospi- tal facilities and a humanized and'belter-run VA administra- tion. Ford reileralcd his commit- ment to a strong national de- fense, warning that he would "ofler no temptations" !o po- lenlial adversaries who watch U.S. readiness. He pledged [hat "jusl as America will maintain ils nu- Bomber Claims Credit for Blast By GARY UBMAN Associated Press Writer LOS ANGELES (AP) A mysterious "alphabet bomb- er" who has terrorized this cily with throats of violence has claimed responsibility for a weekend chemical explosion that leveled a city block in a downtown industrial section. Aulhorities'hart said earlier lhal Ihe massive explosion which destroyed a warehouse and burned several buildings Saturday night was nol caused by a bomb but by a chemical ignition. The SMTth continued for the bomber. A thousand extra po- lice assigned lo Inc case have 'received more lhan 200 calls on the identity o( Isaac Ras- im, (he foreign-acccnlcd man who now claimed rcsponslblli- ty for planting at Icasl three bombs in ihe Los Angeles area, including Ihe falal Aug. G airport blast lhal killed Ihree persons and injured 35 others. nasini and his previously unknown group, "Aliens of lold Ihe I.os Ange- les Herald-Examiner in a lelc- phone call Sunday that his group was responsible for a chemical blnsl Saturday in the parking lol of the Intcramcrj- ean Slar Trucking and Ware- house Corp. The caller identi- fying himself as Hasim has frequently conlacted the Her- ald-Examiner lo malic pro- nouncements on liis siege ot terror. "Our invcsligalors are look- ing into" liaslm's contention, said Police Cnulr. Peter 1U- gan. "They will confer wilh the Herald-Examiner people Related story, Pg. 8B and we will have a slalcmcnt as soon we know something." The calm speaking caller, believed of eastern Mediterra- nean extraction, told Ihe news- paper: "Last night's work at 7lh and Mateo is the delin- quent leftovers of our aclivi- lics 'one week ago. Our prom- ise to keep (inaudible) clear of friends is in we want some public reaction on behalf .of public representa- tives in order nol lo shorten Ihose few days." Rnsim rliil not explain in his latest communication how he could have detonated the chemical charge Saturday night. Three large buildings were destroyed and windows were shattered for blocks around in the explosion which was felt 15 miles away. City fire officials estimated damage at million but one insurance investigator placed it at ?S million. Five persons were injured. finslm has been nicknamed the alphabet bomber because of his claims that he sel off explosives connecled wilh the letters of his group's name. He had indicated his next tar- gel would have some connnec- lion wilh (he letter the third letter in his organiza- tion's name. "I" appears in Inlcramerican .Star Trucking Co. The firm Is localed only blocks (TOW the Greyhound bus depot where Friday night's bomb was planted. clear we will never (alt behind in nego- tiations to conlrol and hopcfu- ly reduce this threat lo man- kind." Nollng that "peace and security require preparedness and Ford added, "Good will must never be mis- construed as a lack of will." It had been expected that Ford might announce hero Uial he would sign a veterans bill that would provide a 23 per. cent increase in monthly paymenls for veterans attend- ing school under Ihe Gl bill. The measure has been ap- proved by Senate-House con- ferees and was expected lo pass both houses this week. Ford's comments here, indi- calcd, however, that he is still looking for some anli-inflalion- ary cuts in veterans' mea- sures anil perhaps in the huge defense budget as well, "If we can send men thou- sands of mjles from hnme lo fight in rice paddies, certainly we can send them back lo school and lo belter jobs al the President said. "I am considering the veter- ans education bill in this he added. your government is constrained by another consideration. We are all soldiers in a war against brutal inflation." He said he was working hard on "a nonpartisan battle plan against excessive govern- ment spending." And, "1 will not hesitate lo use Ihe vclo lo control iriflaliohafy excesses.'.1 Ford said his new admlnis- nation was pledged In human- ize the VA and improve its "I want no arrogance or in- difference to any individual, vcleran or I.e said. "The government's machinery ex: isls lo serve people and nol lo fiuslrale or liumillale them."   

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