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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 15, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 15, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR TO FRIENDS OR-'FQES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD.EXACTLY AS IT 84TH YEAR, NO. .59. PHONE 673-4271: ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, THURSDAY AUGUST 15, PAGES IN FOUR SECTIONS Price 15 Cents Aaoeiettd By ELJJE RUCKER Whining Air Cooler Disturbing at Night Q. Our neighbor bus his air condi- i tioner -unit about 15 feet from our bedroom window. It whines so badly we have to sleep in the guest room. Is there a regulation. in Abilene regard- ing bothersome -air. conditioners? We are ready to meet with the City Cdun- A. There's a :rioise ordinance, it mainly pertains to motorcycles, and mini-bikes but does prohibit "unreasonable, loud, 'disturb- ing unnecessary noise yrtiich causes niate- rial distress or discomfort to people of sensibilities." Better wait a few weeks. On a 105 degree day, it might difficult to prove the noise was unneces- sary, Q. Concerning beautificalion In the downtown area, what, happened lo the trees around the telephone building? Someone let them die. Is it (be city's responsibility to maintain and water the trees? A. Originally, says, Bob Bridges of Southwestern Bell, the city agreed to care for the trees if the phone company would buy them and also the containers. Three or so months after they were planted, the city decided it couldn't afford to take care of them so responsibility fell back on the plione company. Every single tree has.been replaced at least once, says Bridges, and watering and maintenance has become a real chore. Kids from the movie theater would throw cups and trash in lile planters, maintenance was an every morning oc- currence. Anyhow. ithe'trees have died, will be removed and not replaced. Q. Is a couple over. S3 years old, drawing Social Secnrrty ;and. getting Medicare, entitled U Medlcaid, wel fare, old age assistance or anything else lo help pay.ihelr stay a nursing home? They still owii their.aome. Can they rent it ar- self It and use the monthly Income to help pay Iheir keep and still get the same benefits? We've not been able lo gel a dear cut an- swer. A. There are too' -many unanswered questions Ipr a yes or no answer, The amount of Social Security you're drawing and also other income enters the picture. Glyn Hammons at the Social Security of- fice will help you once 'you -fill him in on Some important details. If you're eligible for Supplemental Secu- rity income, you're eligible for Sfedicaid. And Mammons says if you go into a nurs- ing home with the intention of returning to your home someday, the home doesn't count as a resource. Bul if you expect to stay in the nursing home, after six months :your home would count against your cligi- bility for Supplemental Security Income. Q. I need a few rattlesnakes (dead) to make bells out of their skins. Know where I could get some? A. Tom J. Goss, Ileporiei-'News- corre- spondent from Colorado City, has your name and. phone number. He's killed a rattlesnake or two in the last few weeks, next one lie kills is yours. Jnst the other day he wiped out a four-footer in Ilic process of devouring a rabbit, whole. The snake was devouring the rabbit, that is. Q. Why can't a diabetic get Insur- ance? The only one I can get doesn'l pay much. I've had surgery Ihree times in four years and .It's tough for a widow lo pay the bill with the cost of hospitals and doctor's bills going up. A. An insurance, agent explained your problem is the fact that you're trying to insure against something that already ex- ists. The economics of insurance are such lhal they are hesitant to insure against a known event or known problem. There's no way to charge a reasonable and fair rate to insure against future problems since diabetes does have side effects that create other problems, says Ihe agent. Address questions lo Aclion Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 7S604. Names will not be used but questions most be signed and addresses given. Please In- clude telephone numbers If possible. "WASHINGTON (AP) For- mer President Nixon sub- poenaed today to appear witness for ;John. D. Ehrlich-. man in the '.Watergate cover-" up trial next'monlh. The subpoena was filed in Ehrlich- man's C. Hall. .It "You are commanded to ap- pear in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia on the 9th day of September, 1974, 'testify on behalf of John D. Ehrlichman arid to remain until called." The subpoena was addressed ..'to'Nixon, at the "Presidential Sari Clemente, Cal- where the former presj- dent-moved after resigning his. "office last Friday. r 1 i c h m an, formerly domestic, Nixon, one of the former president's closest advisers. .There ;vyas no indication -in the filing'at district court that the: subpoena actually had been served. Any party in a lawsuit may issue subpoenas for-v.ilnesses without .prior court approval. However the recipient may ask thc.court to dismiss a sub- poena later. Ehrlichman is one of six de- fenlanls .scheduled to go on trial Sept. 9 on charges of ob- structing justice by attempting to thwart the investigation of the Watergate break-in at the Democratic parly's rational, headquarters in 1972. The other defendants are former White House chief of staff H. R. Italdemari; former Atty..Gen..John'.N. Mitchell; former Ualdemah aide Gordon Slrachan, former Nixon re- election committee aide and one-time assistant AJty. Gen. Robert C. Mardian; and Ken- neth Wells Parkinson, a re- election committee lawyer. Ehdichman had attempted to subpoena Nixon while he was.siill president. That was.in connection with California state charges against' Ehrlich'inan, most -of which have since been dis- missed, growing out of the break-in at the office of Daniel Ellsberg's pyschialrist, Dr New Shadow at tlje Window .President For'd stands'with "''his.-.back to the win-" clows in his oval office inHhe While House Wed- nesclay night as he ponders his first real crisis, !he fighting on Cyprus. The story on his handling of the situation is on Pg. 5B. (AP Wirephqto) Coins for Soviet Jews Expected WASHINGTON senators who have opposed passage of a trade bill to in- sist on free emigration for So- viet Jews said today after meeting with President Ford that there are indications the problem can be solved and the bill passed. "We're moving in the direc- tion of an agreement und there .has been significant So- viet said Sen. Henry M; Jackson, D-Wash. "We're gelling off dead cen- said Sen. Abraham Ribi- coff, D-Conn. Sen. Jacob Javils, fi-N.Y., said they agreed (he role of the President was a decisive one in the situation and pre- dicted the negotiations now underway will be successful and a trade bill "can be passed." The three senators emerged from an hour-long scrambled eggs breakfast meeting with Ford Secretary of. State A. Kissinger to tell re- porters that Ford's "direct and interven- tion1' in Ihe mailer had given them.new hope (hat the Jew- ish emigration issue, which has stalemated the trade re- form bill, may now be re- solved. .'Jackson saiij Ihcre is now movement to give. President certain discretionary au-. thority in (he trade bill pre- sumably to grant the Soviets U.S. DEPARTMENT Of COMMERCE NoliorML WMther Service (Weather Mop, n. IB) ABILENE AND VICINITY (19-mile rodius) Clear to partly cloudy IhroiKih Fridoy. No Important lefflpera- ture South winds 10 10 15 miles per hear. High today mid Ms; low lonlaht 70s; high FrWav upper 9's. High and'low (or 34 hours ending 7 a.m.: W and 73. Htan onJ same dale lasl 100 and 72. Sunrise lotjay: sunset tonight sunrise tomorrow: mpsl-favored-nation treatment and tariff improvements in re- turn for some assurances of freer Jewish emigration and an end to what he described as harassment of Soviet Jews, and the limilalion of the num- bers permitted to leave their homeland. These provisions will be in- cluded in the bill, Jackson said. Jackson said Soviel'Am- bassador Analoly Dobrynin, who relumed from his country for a meeting Wednesday at the House wilh Presi- dent Ford, "has addressed himself to this specific prob- lem." Jackson emphasized (hat Ihe meeting with Dobrynin antl Ford's "direcl inlervention in this mailer has given it new momentum and new move- ment." In his speech Monday night to it jbiiil session of Congress, Ford stressed Ihe importance he- places on passage of a trade reform bill in the inter- est of world peace and U.S. economic-prosperity. The three senators have led opposition lo passage of the bill without the Jewish emi- gration safeguards and a hua- man rights provision. NEWS INDEX Amusements 8C Bridge 7C Business Mirror...........4B Business Nolcs............ 5C Cloisifkd.............. 4-8D Comics 9C Edilorrals 4A Horoscope 6A Hospital Patients......... 28 Obituaries 7A Spans To Your Good.Heolth......7B TV Log BC TV Scouf................ 8C Women's News ;......3B Lewis Fielding of Beverly Hills. A California judge issued'a subpoena.in that case but be-- fore Ihe Washington, D.C., Su- perior Couit could act on'il, Ihe issue was made moot .by dismissal of the charges. Ehrllchman was 'convicted July 12 in U.S..district court on one count of conspiring lo violate Fielding's civil righls and two counts of lying1 to'a' Watergate grand jury. He was sentenced id serve-20 months lo 5 years in prison, but is free.while appealing the. sen- tence. Before that trial began, lichman was in a subpoena, fight with the White House over access lo personal-notes' he had left there when he re-- signed April 30, 1973. That dispute was settled compromise with. the. House after U.S. District Judge.1 Gerhard -A.' Gcscll threatened to dismiss the case' if (he White' House withheld evidence. Turks Launch Nicosia Attack BY THE ASSOCIATED'PRESS Turkish forces launched at- lacks on the Cypriot capital of Nicosia from the east arid west today in what appeared to be.a move lo surround the city'entirely. At the same time, the Turk- Cypriot radio said Turkish warships joined the air and artillery batlle for the eastern port of Fairiagusta and a Turkish assault .for. Lefka be- gan on the western front be- hind heavy air strikes. The broadcast seemed to be RRCAsks Petroleum Cooperation AUSTIN, Tex. Texas Railroa'd Commission today set the statemde oil pro- -duction allowable for Septem- ber at 100 per cent for the 30th consecutive month. "Gentlemen, it is 'obvious Texas is continuing Ib' strain to do its best for Ihe state and Ihe nation to' meet the de- mands for energy." said Jim Langdon, commission chair- man. Langdon said all stales must "maximize" their efforts: to solve the nation's, energy needs. For states that can drill offshore or build offshore terminals for super- tankers must be willing to do so, he said. "We need the total cooperation'of Hie'entire na- tion lo meet these he said. Major buyers of Texas crude reduced their nomina- tions by 17.95D barrels a day from to in September. Nominations by major pur- chasers of Texas crude oil for September, in barrels per day, with changes from August in parentheses: Amoco Atlantic- Richfield Chevron Cities Service Continental 54.5CO (up Diamond Shamrock Exxon (down Gulf (down Koch (down .Mobil Permian (down Scurlock (down 1.000) Shell (down Sun Texaco Onion of California Bowl to Resume National Anthem LOS ANGELES (AP) The Southern California Sympho- ny-Hollywood Bowl Association, has decided to resume playing the national anthem before ev- ery concert, a reversal of a decision it made one day ear- lier. Executive Director Ernest Flcischmann released a one- sentence statement Wednes- day saying, "The consensus of the board of director's at Us meeting was lo revert lo its former practice of playing the National Anlhem al the Holly- wood Bowl." Overtime payments .to the Los Angeles Philharmonic performers had reached year, a'spokesman had said Tuesday in explain-1 ing the major reason why-the anthem had been dispensed with. A spo kes m a n'said ;on Wediicsdn" that performances j of the anthem would resume in the giant outdoor concert hall tonight. Concerts arc held at Ihe Bowl about four limes a week. further confirmation that Turkish invasion forces were trying to -bisect. Cyprus' along an east-west line that Would slice off the island's northern third to create a Turkish au- lonomous region. are .in'a des'pera'te sjlu- ation, ready to clutch at :any straw. lo save ourselves or preserve as much as we a 'senior. Cyprus' official said. V sound' ,'6.f'. explosion's shook Nicosia mingling'with the noise of ma- chine gun and small arms fire; from Green Line, no-man's Jana" embattled Greek .and sectors of .j. The renewed fighting, started at dawn, shattered a cease-fire agreed, to Iby... both; sides Wednesday night.' The lull lasted only through the hours of darkness. The camp of h'le 950 strong G r e e k army contingent, permanently based on Cyprus; was one of ihe main targets of the assault, and fighting raged at midday. The as.UJe El- dyk, is on.the main western highway to Morphou, It lies two miles .capital; about a inile from the perime-' ter of Cyprus Greek hands. Taylor, Erajh Counties Okayed For Farm Aid U.S. Sen. John Tower an- nounced Thursday riciilture Department has de- clared, fanners and ranchers in Taylor and Eraih counties' eligible to apply for .emergen-' cy loans Ihrough the Farmers Home Administration because of crop and livestock losses, due to drought conditions since November.. Applications for emergency loan assistance may be filed in the FHA office serving Er- ath County in.Stephenville at ,265 S. Virginia, and the office serving Taylor County in Abi- lene at Room 2203 in the Fed- eral Building. Farmers Home Administra- tion, a rural credit-service agency, and the U.S. Depl. of Agriculture, has authorized the loans for physical losses until Oct. 15, 197-1, and (or pro- duction losses until May'. 15, 1975. Loans are repayable in their enlirely at an interest rate of 5 per cent. S. Korean Chief Escapes; Wife Dies MRS. CHUNG HEU PARK head .would laUl SEOUL (AP) President Chung Hee Park escaped an assassination attempt today, but-his wife was killed, a pres- idential spokesman an- nounced. He said she died after a nearly six-hour operation at (he Seoul National University hospital of a gunshot wound slie suffered during tlie assas- sination allcmpl. The; attempt look phicc us Park was making an Inde- pendence Day address, A man opened fire, the president ducked down behind Ihe speaker's desk and was not hil, but his 47-year-old wife was hit in the head. Security guards wounded the gunman and arrested him. A 16-year-old girl choir sing- er in Ihe audience also was killed, possibly by police bul- lets. The government said Ihe gunman carried a Japanese passport, and Ihe Japanese Foreign Ministry said it was Issued in the name of Yiiklo Yoshii, 23, of Osaka. But Yoshii lold a television inter- viewer in Osaka: "I am not Ihe gunman. I am in Japan. Somebody must have taken advantage of my najne." Park was making an Inde- pendence Day address to about persons in Ihe Na- tional Theater to observe Soulh Korea's 29th anniver- sary. Witnesses said the man ran lovvard the slage and opened fire from about the third row. The government statement said Ihe man's revolver mis- fired, then he fired twice. One bullet struck the desk that protected Park. Another hit Mrs. Park, who was sitting be- hind, her husband. The young girl was a her of. a 200-voice girls' choir: lhat was lo perform for Ihe celebration. She was silling W .the front row. i Aflcr. Mrs. Park snd the glrj were earned bleeding from the auditorium and Ihe wound-] ed. gunman was removed) Park said: "j will resume my slalemenl.'l He talked for five nilnules, then ihe girls' choic sang for1 a few minutes.-The presiSonl received a standing ovation' as he left the Ihealer for Ino university hospital In be'wiih his wife, i   

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