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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 14, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 14, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO'FRIENDS 'OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT NO. 58 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE; WEDNESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 14, 1974 PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS: Price 15 Cents Aaociateil ipfffPfP Getting Check from Above By BILL HERRIDGE Reporter-News Staff Writer The next ,tirne you decide to speed a little, you'd better look up. Thi-Texas Depart- ment of Public Safety's High- way Patrol has taken lo the air ID enforce Ihe 55 .mph. speed limit. A .Midland-based DPS heli- copter is monitoring ground speed on the Interstate High- way System in the Region Four area, which covers an area bounded by El Paso, San Angelo, Abilene and Midland.' The helicopter, said Lt. Jack Crownover of the Abilene Dis- trict DPS office, visits the Abi- lene area on' a monthly, basis. "WE STARTED' using the Lt. Crownovcr said, "when the .55 mph speed limit was reduc- tion in speed represented such a drastic change that we had to rely on everything al our disposal to' enforce the rul- ing." He said the h e i i c o p t e r- ground unit system had been used about three years 'ago, but had been discontinued un- til the governor signed the speed limit ruling into effect. "The helicopter is just an- other tool in enforcing the speed- limit 'Lt. Crow- nover said. "We don't look at it as a trap' of any kind." The system works like this. Painted stripes crossing the Interstate at 880-foot intervals, are used in conjunction with a stop watch by the airborne ob- server to determine the speed of an auto crossing the stripes. The observer, LI; Crownover has a chart that correlates the lime an auto re- quires to cross the stripes with the vehicle's ground speed. "THE V OBSERVER has a .coded chart thai identifies the auto as to color, and, it possi- ble, to he said. "The helicopter retains the offend- ing vehicle in sight until the ground unit slops the driver. "The color and make codes are used on the citation Issued to the driver, making the sys- tem foolproof." lie said previous cases have proven that the enforcement system will hold up in court. Although DPS keeps no separate records of airborne-related traffic convic- tions, Lt. Crownover said the system is working with satis- factory results.' THE SPEED, stripes arc in'.; the Abilene area only on the Interstate system, with no "oth- er roadways c u r r e n't-1' y marked. 'He said that other cities in the region may have side roads and dangerous in-' .tersectipn areas marked. "We don't look at the sys- tem as a 'spy in Ihe Lt. Crownover said. "And, like ra- dar or any other means.of speed enforcement, if the driv- er isn't speeding, he has nolh- inglo worry STKIPES FOR SPEED Now Helicopters will Catch You Speeding By The Associated Press Heavy fighting broke out on Cyprus today following the breakdown of peace efforts, prompting Greece to withdraw its military forces from the North Atlantic: Treaty Organi- zation. Turkish forces 'apparently captured the Gre'ek Cypriot- conlrolled Cyprus broadcast- ing station in southern Nico- sia, and a voice said in Greek, "Greece cannot do anything for you. Give yourselves up to the Turkish forces." An earlier announcement in English said, "This is the voice of and then an- nounced that Turkish troops School Hearing On Million Budget 'A By ANN KLORES Reporter-News Staff Writer A public hearing on the pro- posed budget for the Abilene Independent School District for the year beginning Sept. 1 will be held Thursday at the school administration building, N! mockingbird JUKI Slate.' The budgel the product of eight summer work sessions of the School Board is up over million from that of the 1973-74 year which totalled Cause for the increase in ex- penditures is mainly-inflation, said Supt. Harold Brinson in proposing his first budgel. A NEW SALARY scale for administrators, h i c h will give an average 0.87 per- cent raise to VO administra- tors, arid a new salary scale for auxiliary personnel, which add to the present salaries of 599 workers, ac- count for part of the increase. Other factors, such as the passing along of a state, raise to district teachers and a hike of in the athletic budgel, also figure in. To take up sonic of the slack between 'anticipated ex- penses and revenues is a pro- posed five-cent tax increase which' would bring the dis- Irict's tax rate to per 5100 valuation based on 55 per cent. To Ihe owner of a home, this would mean an in- crease of in his school taxes for a lotal lax of per year'. On a home, Ihe increase would be for a tolal of 5127.88. On a home, the increase would be for a total tax of EXPLAINED that two cents of hike is Colorado City Boy Killed by Piano COLORADO CITY (HNS) A boy died about 6 p.m. Tuesday in Root Memori- al .Hospital here after a piano he was helping. his mother move fell on him. Timothy Alvarez; son of Mr. and Mrs. Rene Alvarez of Col- orado City, was taken to the hopital about p.m. Police Chief .Jesse Browning said the boy was still under the piano when police arrived immedi- ately after the accident. Funeral services are pend- ing with Kikcr-Seale Funeral Home here. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Nolionol Weather Service (Weolher Map. P3. 2B> ABILENE AND VICINITY (lO-mile radius) Clear lo Darllv cloudy and worm Icdav Ihroucih Thursday, soulrier- ly winds 6 lo IS mph. AilDrnoon nlon temperatures In Ihe mid-Ms. Tonight's low near 70. High and low lor 24 hours ending 9 a.m.: 92 and 13. Hloh and low same dale last year: M and 69. Sunrlie today: sunset tonight: Sunrise tomorrow: necessary (or.the district to maintain Us payments on past bond issues while the remain- ing three cents will go to off- set an anticipated budget defi- cit of Earlier in the board's budg- et; deliberation's, it appeared that Ihe.deficit would be ap- proaching Board P res i d e n t C.G. ".Gov. Dolph Briscoe urging him.to call a special .session of: the legisla- iure dealing with the school finance crisis, not only in Abi- lene but throughout the slate. As it becariie apparent that the governor would not dp so, Brinson. proposed and the board accepted a plan-under which of 1973-74 un- budgeted federal funds (sur- would'-be transferred into Ihe 1974-75 budget along with an additional in federal impacted aid funds'ex- pected lo be paid to the dis- trict.nexl year. MOST OF THE increase in the proposed budget over that of the 1973-74 year is due lo. increases in salaries for'pcr- sonnel at all levels and to in- creases in equipment, materi- al and travel costs. Except for the addition of a printing program at Cooper High and expansion of .the Co- ordinated'Vocational Academ- ic Education (CVAE) program to the junior high level, pro- grams during the coming year will be basically the same as the past year, Brinson said. Strange Maryland Governor Remarries Quickly ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) Gov. Marvin Mandel has mar- ried Jeanne Blackistone Dor- sey, a; half hour after his first marriage was formally dis- solved by. a judge. The unannounced but not .unexpected marriage was per- formed in a 15-minule ceremo- ny on Tuesday at liar Sinai Congregation in Baltimore. 64, 'left his first wife, Barbara "Boolsie" -Man- del, on July 3, 1973, saying he was divorcing her after 32 years, of-marriage lo wed his long-lime girlfriend. The former. Mrs. Mandel rc- sisted the governor's marriage plans-and refused to move out of ihe executive mansion for several months after Handel's announcement. Idaho Boosts Fee On Evel Knievel (AP) Evel Knievel now has permission lo come down when he tries to jump the Snake River Canyon on his motorcycle Sept. 8. But it will -cost more than he thought to do it. The Idaho Land Board Mon- day approved a permit for the motorcycle slunlnian lo land on slate property on the other side of the quarter-mile-wide canyon. Bui the board boosted the fee from and specified the permit would not include television "or motion picture rights for filming from the tract of stale land on Ihe north side of the were advancing to the south- east and southwest of Nicosia. Turkish armor and infantry blasted their way- through Greek Cypriot lines on Ihe island, rocking Cyprus with heavy explosions and sending up huge columns of smoke from devastated build- ings. At least 41 persons were re- ported wounded in the first few. hours of fighting, includ- ing 28 patients in a menial hospital, 12 members bf-'Uiu U.N..peacekeeping.force and one new'sman. The Greek ra- dio claimed four 'Turkish planes were downed. Turkey said it wanted to- gain control -of only a- "tail--' share" of territory for the Turkish Cypriots and not Ihe whole island. This was an ap- parent reference to the north-. ern part'bf-Cyprus. -Greece announced .its with- drawal from military partici- pation in NATO as a.result of the onslaught and discussed the :possibility of War with Turkey. Witnesses in northern Greece reported new tanks on flat pars and trains moved through the night and early today in Ihe direction of the Turkish border. Representatiyes of. the .15 NATO governments met ur- gently in Brussels arid most of (hem (old Greece they hoped its''withdrawal from the mili- tary organization would be only temporary, a spokesman said.- In London, Archbishop Mak- arios, deposed president of Cy- prus, called on the world's major powers to rescue the eastern Alediterranear. island from what he called "barba- rous Turkish aggression." "What'the Turks failed to achieve at the Geneva confer- ence by blackmail, and gun-. boat diplomacy, they are now attempting to get by brutal the archbishop said. .He" spoke less than 24 hours after Turkey walked out of the Geneva'peace the U.N. Security Council adopted a British, resolution' calling [or a new Cyprus cease-fire and resumption of the conference. Air space over Turkey, Greece and .Cyprus was closed vvith'lhe new outbreak of fight- ing on Ihe island, and tele- phone and telex lines -to Cy- prus were cul.off. On Cyprus, the Greek Cypri- ols began falling back east and west of Nicosia, taking antiaircraft balleries with them as the Turkish tanks and artillery broke through their lines, behind heavy air' strikes and rolling artillery and mor- tar barragesrncwsmen said. Other reports said the .Turks advanced 400 yards beyond the so-called Green Line divid- ing the Turkish and Greek quarters of Nicosia and enve- loped the British high commis- sioner's office. BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) A'broadcast said (oday Turkish forces had cap- tured the Nicosia airport and were encircling the Cypriol. capital. Tlie announcement' of the' capture of the airport came on the previously G r e e k -c o n- Irolled 'Cyprus Broadcasting Co. station: The which had been broadcasting Greek- -Cypriot communiques and martial mu- sic suddenly went off the air, and eight minutes later re- turned with a brief appeal-in Greek for. Greek Cypriots to give up. "Greece cannot do anything for the radio said. "Give yourselves up to the Turkish forces." T A few minutes later, 'after a n n o u n c i n g that Turkish forces were advancing lo the southeast and southwest of the city, the radio said: and the air- port areas previously held .by Ihe Greek forces have been captured." "All operations have been successfully carried out ac- cording to the radio said. It added that this an-, nouncement came from the Turkish military commander in Cyprus. 'Self-Sacrifice' Sought In Conquering Inflation By GAYLORD SHAW Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (A P) President Ford conferred with Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger on the Cyprus crisis today, then- turned to econom- ic problems and urged "an at- mosphere of self-sacrifice" to help deal with inflation. Ford added a meeting with Sen. Russell B. Long, D-La., to his crowded schedule in an apparent move to gain support for the administration effort to reactivate the Cost of Living Council'to monitor wage and Live Mike Boo-Boos Lift Eyebrows By E1JJE RUCKEB Q. I heard a radio disc jockey on live mike'knock over a .slack of rec- ords and shout out four-letter words. Radio listeners were startled I'm sure but the disc, jock's reaction was stunned, otter shock. He was so upset I coolda't beip bat wonder what is ihe (ederal penalty tor vulgarity on the air? Is the penalty on the amnincer or station tr both? A. I( the FCC-wanted to get lough, it. could fine a station up lo and revoke its license. The station would very iikely fire the announcer. But Ihe FCC has loosened up considerably in the last 10 years and it's pretly doubtful that kind of penally would be invoked for an acciden- tal infraction. Probably Ihe DJ had visions of walking Ilio strccls spni'fhlng for another lob when the Ftaiion mancior fired him. Some sta- tion managers feel very strongly about this kind of conduct. One said, "If one of my announcers did it, I would lire him on Ihe spot and would not recommend him for a position with any other radio station." The reaction varied though. Another manager said if it was an accident, not deliberate, he would be more tolerant. "We've all said things we wish we hadn't on-the air. Every stalion should act in a responsible manner. We're strict with our on-air personnel but even the FCC is be- coming more liberal." There was a day when navel oranges couldn't'be advertised on radio .because navel was an unacceptable word. Nowa- days you hear four-letter words on rec- ords, television, and even from heads of government. A ctiain of radio stations on Ihe west coast is awfully freehanded wilh talk shows on subjecls like abortion, sex, drugs, just about anything. Yet the FCC has been reluctant lo lake Iheir license, fine Ihem or even stop Ihcni. What's UK phone number of the person who sends Girl Scouts out to pick-up papers for recycling I lost it. I have boxes boxes of papers and tied slacks. A. Read your paper daily. In a week or so the city's Environmental Goals Com- mittee should have an announcement about a new re-cycling project manned by members of civic clubs. Dates of opera- tion and locations of delivery pioinls should be established at their next meet- ing. Those Girl Scouts haven't been col- lecting for months. It just wasn't very practical to operate a pick-up service. 0. Why are my greei pecans falling off the trees when there's sigi of insects or disease? A. Bitmc our wierd weather. We had lhat long dry. spell with temperatures in Ihe' 100's, then Bam! it rained like mad and turned cold. Stomp on the pecans. You'll find they're full of water. Some pecan varieties react more llian olhers, Burketl's are particularly our yard and garden expert Paula Carter. There's simply nothing you can do about il. Q. My favorite commercial is the one where the dogs "ItU" us abott Pnrlna Dog Lately though they've been lea ring off the cutest the Mexlcai Chlhanhna. How come? A. It' seems the Purina people cut the commercial from seven dogs to five dogs because they were afraid they weren't getting enough of the product improve- ment message across. Dogs were cut arbi- trarily, nothing against the Chihuahua. The ad agency may review its decision though since you aren't the only one who misses that dog. Address questions (o Aclloi Line, BOY 34, Abilene, Texas.7KM. .Names will not be used but questions must he signed and addresses given. Please Include telephone numhm If possible. price increases, "Why can't everybody make a little sacrifice'.'" to cope wilh inflation, Ford said as he sat down wilh the senator. The President and Kissinger met earlier in Ihe Oval Office in the wake of renewed fight, ing on Cyprus. As he was leaving his Alex- andria, Va., home this morn- ing (or the White House, Ford told reporters he also had con- ferred Tuesday night by tele- phone with Kissinger on the latest developments in Cyprus. The President did not elabo- rate. It.was the new President's first international crisis. On domestic matters, a White House spokesman con- ceded (or the first time that Ford may be growing at- tached to his new job and Ford served notice that he in- tends to be his own man in economics as well as politics. White House Press Secre- tary Jerald F. IcrHorst re- layed the word on Tuesday NM INDEX Amusements............. 6B BridGS Business Mirror 8A Clossified............. 3-7C Comics T. 7B Editoriok 4A Horoscope 8B Hospital PotienU 28 Obituaries 2A Sports 1-2.8C To Ycur Good Hedtri....... SB TV Loa ___............ 68 TV Sccul "68 Women's News ,'..........JB that there would be-a ''Ford program" lo fight inflation, wilh the firm imprimatur of the new President. One of Ford's economic pro- posals was to be revealed to- day when Budget Director Roy L. Ash appears before the House Banking, and Currency Committee to outline recom- mendations for an anti-infla- tion agency. Terlforst acknowledged thai. Ihe economic policies lhat for- mer President Richard M. Nixon had announced only a month ago in a Los Angeles speech, face possible revision or replacement. Asked if these policies rvere under review and liable lo change, lerHorst "That would be a fair statement." A WEEK-INK! WANTU CETSYOm TOmWTlK! 15WOI0S 3 IATS SAY! Additional worJl. 15' otdetij Coih' in advonte Dflfldlif r pni   

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