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Abilene Reporter News: Friday, August 9, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 9, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                WORLD EXACTLY AS IT EVENING, AUGUST PAGESIN FOUR SECTIONS Pnce 15 Cents ttaoctmtti Pna (fl Best Efforts .BjEUJERUCKHI Now Is Good Time For Hot Vegetables Q. What sort of vegetables can you plant in like right now? Waeed to do? A.-NoW-is aC'good liriie'fpr.'any of the hot' weather vegetables greens, black-eyed okra, green Our. Paula- Carter'tells us tbe'big secret of hot weather shade with mulch leaves, hay or newspapers. -You'll have tastier-vegetables if Die jgtmnd is kept cool. In a Drought situation like: we've experi- enced, :you need to little more, about once a month. Salt in the soil blocking movement of food through the soil.. arid into .the plant. Uso a1 three' numbered plant food or rose (J. Two giris canei Ip my- door In' Winters taking a survey Wr the they. said. What is-the OEjO' going to do with this information? A. if.you-'were surveyed by the Children's Development Center, the information will be used to determine, how many parents of four-year-olds arc interested in enrolling children in the Headstart program in Winters. Either I'm confused, or somebody at City Hall gave you a bum steer. The other day you quoted the .City Building Inspector as saying he'd' tag old cars ,and have them hauled away alter 19 days. Well I called the City Building Inspec- tor about some abandoned cars.ln my :block, was (old he had nothing to do .with it, I should call the police. Exactly what Is Ihe ordinance on old 'cars, who enforces it and. how can M'e make our.ordinance stricter to clear Ihe- city of these old eyesores? A. .Oops, forgive we'passed along The jurik-abandoried.car 'ordinances were amend- about 'a month ago. putting' enforcement in'the hanbs'of the police departmeht. 'The qrdinances.are'pagesllong and aftei wsding ic too lengthy to print an dioo complicated to condense. What action is taken by police depends on what category'the'carifits aban doned. Just report-the dilapidated cars to the 'police. They'll' put them in the proper category and determine what can. be .done, legally.. There are not a lot of changes that can be made in the junk-abandoned car ordinances says our City Attorney Don Clieatham, since they must stay within the boundaries of state laws on the subject. 0. 11 understand ,WTU uses several hundred gallons an hour'o( Lake Phan torn waier In its plant at the Lake and sends this water back into the lake at a very high temperature. Has the Slate Water Board notified .Ihe elly (hat Ihe Lake Phantom water sup- ply cannot be approved if the tempera- lure is above a certain degree Farenheit because of increasing Ihe algae level? Is this the reason Ihe city of Abilene proposes to raise the spillway height? 'A. No, Bob Kennedy of West Texas Utili- ties, after consulting with his engineers, found that water at .the point of discharge is only 6 to 8 degrees warmer than when it's taken from the lake. Engineers run tests frequently, he says, and have found only a 3 degree difference in water temperature 200 yards out into the 'lake. So it mixes quickly. Kennedy says the WTU plant operates under a permit from the. Texas Water Quality Board. City Water Supt.' Bill says, "we don't think it increases the algae growth and we haven't noticed any change in the temperature." Q. I'd like to know if there's a John Denver concert scheduled within a 2W- tnile radius of Abilene In near future (two or fhrce Denver is scheduled to appea rin Dallas Oct. 22, in Fort Worth Oct. la. Tickets go on sale at Preston Ticket Agency in Dallas the month of the show. Address qnestions to Action Line, Box JO, Abilene, Texas 7SW4. Names will not be used but questions miisi be signed and addresses include lel- epiione numbers If possible. _______ s'. Writer Job Rote Low; Workers Needed Abilene's per cent unemployment rate is the lowest in Texas, but local industries also could use more manpower. Story and -photo, Pg. IB. Amusertienrj............. 5C Bridge................. 'Business Mirror...........8C Classified 2-8O Comics- 7C ..Editorials..... -4A Horoscope 1 OD Hnsofiol Pcticnls SB vObltiiorios 3A "Swirls Travel....'.'.., 4.5B To Your Good TV Loq.............. SC TV Scout SC Women's News .-........'2-3B claring hirnself ready start Ford stood the presidency toda'y, a'pjairi'nian vaullid to tlie-piJinaole 61 that shat- .tered; Richard'M. Nixon's ad- ministration; .of he becomes' ;tlie: national- elec- tion, 'succeeding the first pres- ident ever to resign 1 To a troubled of pledged Thursday' night "my .forts in cooperation, leader-, ship and'dedication in what's good for America and. good for the world.' Then afler stepping fiom Hello, ford Vice.'President-Gerald Ford receives a hug Thursday night'from Ann Abbruz- fzese, 6] ra'neighbor, outside his home in Alexandria, Va. come out to reporters after President :Nixon announced 'that he would resign 'ef- (AP: his suburlan doorway in a bathrobe to pick up a morning newspaper with a bold black headline, "Nixon" Ford breakfast and headed for the Executive Office Building. He told reporters he terrible responsibility the feeling pf-sadhess on one hand and expeclalldn to stall to build on the other." A few hpiira latei't bencalh Ihe glillering chandeliers of Complete Texts Of Nixon, Ford Speeches on 9D the White'House. East Room, Nixon bade a tearful farewell to his staff and cabinet. _ His loice breaking .his "eyes; 'glistening with we've'done "som.e things wrong in this administration: and the lop man always takes the resj but "no man or no woman ever profited" from the: public'till: "Mistakes yes, but personal gain, he declared, not one single woman." Ford "was nbt: but he Has to ualk with Nixon to a helicopter waiting on the lawn to take the 37th president from the flhite House lo private life. 4 simple ceremom, in the White House Oval Office was ananged to swear m Ford, Ihe House Republican leader when named by Nixon last Oc- tober Agnew, who resigned president and was convicted tax evasion in. a bribery and kickback scandal. Tord s wife, three sons and one. daughter; his Lembryonic official family and a friends vrere to ]OIB a national television- audience' in "watch-: ing the.formal transition of presidential power r But Nixon was not He planned to leave the White House before the ceremony, heading home to California, his 'B jears of public service ended by public and political pressure. Chief .Justice E. Burger was summoned back from Europe-to administer to Ford the oath; of'.'office Nixon of violating "I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the of- fice'of the President of the United arid will. best of my ability, presen'e, prptect-and. defend'the.Consti- "-lution of the'United The rmdterm inauguration was the cbmax lo an filled week m which the pres sure on biixon to resign, and the rumors that he would do so, built steadily s announcement on Jlondaj that he had withheld kej eMdence about his early Knowledge of atergale on po- litical giounds caused even his staunches! supporters to de mand his impeachment 01 res ignaiion Ford uiherited the leader ship of a nation that IS'ixon said desperately needs to heal the wounds.of Watergate. In- deed, outgoing'.president said he hoped his departure speed that process The leadership of Amenta will lie in good said Nixon spoke on na tional lelev radio fron sui of the presidency-he was dering after 2J27 days The nation too a few minutes. Miter, when "Ford spoke in the rain outgde his subm oan Uexandna, Va home. "1 think the Presidenl of lie United fa tales has made one of the greattst personal sacri- fices for tne country and one of the finest personal decisions on behali of all of us Amen cans by his decision {o re Ford said. His ejes filled with teais the balding, broad shouldered 61 year-old Ford promised to work on the'problems, serious ones, which we have at home, Hi the spirit of cooperation w hlch I believe wiD be eihltat ed uith the Congress and the new president Connolly Charge (APJ-Fw mer Trwstrry Secretary Jvki briber} perjury t> fee rntOc ruitttrair duel U S District Jitfge L Han IT released tonally to the coMody Us irtorney, Edward BtMett Wfl hamst ani Urn uttnited travel rigbfs No trial date set WH liintfl asked, ud iccehed tUr U flee ta ffie that he said might iNeet'lbV trial date J At Stamford Howard Named Superintendent (KNS) -Don How ard principal of Stamford High past tno naffltg Su pcrintendent of Schools here at a board of education meet ing Thursday night Howard was prniapil of BeyriolfJs Elementary School jn Stamford for six jeafs be foie going to Pecos nbere he was an assistant principal of an elementary school one jeai and principal of the junior high tno years He returned to Stamford in 1972 Howard earned his bache lor s degree in education at HcMurry College in Abilene and his masters at Hardin Simmons Unuersity He 'is' Mhe for- mer Gerry Ann-Baize of Stam- ford., they; haye_ three chil- and Edie. Howard -Woodie Leave' o-ieflgned to 'be the Speciai'Tautalion Co- By! HARRY F. RbSENTHAl, AssoclaW'Press .Writer 'WASHINGTON Richard M, Nixon took tearful leave of the .White.House'and to- day, telling the men arid.vom-. en who served him that only a man in the.cleepest valley can know-; "how., is.'.' to :be, ;on the; highest'-.trioun-'.. Then' he California, one; last journey aboard1 Air Force One, departing a scant two hours before the.formal passage of presidential power to qerald H. Ford. Nixon told his associates :and 'aides.when- things "Jdo not suffers1 defeat, some think that all is 'ended. "Not said. "It's >.ionly a beginning, For--Nixon said' greatness comes a man not' when things go good, but .when he is "disappointed, when he lakes some knocks. It was an in- trospective, emotional, and in- tensely He counseled .his assistants and advisers not to hate those who hate who hale .you don't win. unless you hate them, and then you de- stroy yourself." And ha said he was proud every man .and woman in .the East Room.' "AsTpoinled out Iril night, sure, we've done some things wrong in this administration, and the top man always takes the 'and I've never ducked Nixon said. "But I want to say one thing- man or rip woman came into .this administration and left it with more of this world's goods than when -he came in. No man or woman ever profiled at the public ex- pense or the public till." So, in an oblique reference to the Watergate scandals that forced him ..to resign, Nixon said there -were, "mistakes, yes, but for personal gain, never." Nixon said he wished .he WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NllMml WmlKr tWMIhtr Hat, U. 5t> ABILENE AND VICINITY (10-mllf radius) cloudy wilh i.chance of IhurKfershowers loday rhrcugh Salur- ,day. Continued warm 12 ID 22 Tht aflernoon higfi be In the middle Hs. low tonight in the lower 70j. Probability or rain is per cent today and 10 per cent lonlgfil end Saturday. High arid low rdr 74 hourt ending a.m.: H ond 73. High ind low same date last vear: and 74. Sunrise today sunset tonight: sunrise tomorrow a wealthy man so he could-recompense .those who served him. But, he said wryr ly, "at the present time I've got to. find a.way 16 p'ay-m'y .taxes. and his wife left the precisely i-at 9 a.m. CDT. Sixteen minutes later the Nixons, and their daughter and son-in-law, ,Tri- cia and Cox. took off in the presidential jet for San Clemente, Calif. II would be airborne over mid America al 11 the hour of presidentia.1 transition to Gerald P. Ford. Op The school board is accept ing applications for a high school principal Weekend Chance Of Rain Seen i fnday's predicted chjnce el jam for Abilene will continue into the weekend, with Jerry 0 Bryant of the National Wea Iher Service "adding- that the hej City has a ''fair chance of showers even if its just scat tered afternoon A southerly "air flow contin- ues to cause the welcome pie, cipilatton, which is occurring across the state the drj extremes of West Texas. O'Bryant said. New es Aim at Dropouts I Staff Writer Abilene school officials are apparently trying to solve what they call a drbpoul problem -with more vocational classes, a new attitude "allerna- tive" school. School Supt: Harold Brinspn outlined threie different programs beginning in August, which will provide a different kind of learning experience, for 750 stu- dents in the seven secondary schools. The most extensive, of these is a feder- al program under the Emergen- cy School Assistance Act (ESAA) which' would' enroll 100 students at each school except Cooper High School and Madison Junior High., BRINSON SAID the program was not" needed as riiucri in tliose hvo schools, which had the lowesl dropout rates .for the hjgh schools and Junior: high schools. consent of both the stu- dent and Ihe parent, the'special classes would focus primarily on basic skills of Usl of 3 Parts reading and mathematics, Brinson ex- plained. Included in Ihe program a liome- scfioolicoorrlinalhr at each of the five schools and a counselor. Brinson said this addition was-an Attempt to involve parents in the children's schooling. A second, more radical approach, is the lOfl-member "alternative" school lo be set up on a campus completely away from the traditional.school atmosphere, Brinson said. This program is for "students whose needs have not been realized by tradi- tional he said, adding thai some students "learn by experiencing in- .slead of vicariously." ALSO A voluntary program, the alter- native school-will stress involvement in extracurricular activities as well as classes. Classes will beheld at Itic old Nike site on. Lake Fort Phantom Road, the former location of Ihe Region 14 Education Serv- ice Center. A third program will be offered at Franklin Jefferson junior high schools of two "cooperative vocational-training programs" at each school, enrolling 40 students in each class. "This is for the marginal Brinson' said, for those "turned off" by academic classes. In each of Ihe three programs, a lower student-teacher ratio is also emphasized, which Brinson said should lead to.more persona! attention. "Involvement is (he he said. "Very few students involved in active programs drop out. The traditional drop out is enrolled in the six-class .clay, sys- icm." "Something is being school board president1 C. G. Wnitlcn stressed, including, lie said, ah attack on the core of the probleni that of disadvanlagcd minorities. "Some of these childicn o( minority background are culturally he said. "This is the type of thing we are really trying (o SCHOOL OFFICIALS and .principals in- dicated that the dichotomy between "ac; ademics" and "vocational" or "techni- cal" training is narrowing. Abilene High School principal Phil Boone said that "eight to'10 jobs in Ihe. future will require technical training." Because of this, several administrators suggested ihat students should begin ear- lier (o decide what field they would like to enter. However, as Boone education is not the only Suggestions for improving the dropout rale included: a smaller student-teacher ratio in all schools lo enhance personal attention. a more attractive and colorful school environment. a constantly 'changing .or fjcx.ible curriculum which would new and different needs as the sludents' require- inents more on -a students strong points. more involvem.enl by. parents. more encbura'gement' more suppdit'in cul- tivating feelings of success. focusing -more on'attitodes-of.ele- nientary school children to nip' problems beforethey more irrolvement in erfiacurriculai- school "WE'RE NOT looking" for Brinson adding. results ''of incoming programs, would take about a year to matenatize.y- c a 1 1 e d the -administration's thrust a ''positive attack" but. riot a "magic formula." "II has to ..be continuous Cooper High School principal Malcolm Anthony added.-.: As for the administration's, new -ap- proach, Brinson said, "tht jury is out." i--   

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