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Abilene Reporter News: Friday, August 2, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 2, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                UT YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT _c I -tj- T V 94TH YEAR, NO.J 46k "PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, FRIDAY EVENING, AUGUST 2. PAGES IN. FOUR SECTIONS Price 15 Cents Auociattd Preu Firefighting Buddies Snell, assistant fire jnarshal with the Abilene Firt Department, talks over'with the dalmation masppt at Ihe Central I1 ire Station (Staff Photo by Bill Herndge) Retiring Fireman Discusses Life in the 'Hot Spots' By Blli HERRIDGE Stoff; Writer Just' kid .who's seen'a fire truck has-wanted, qt some.time or other, to be a. fireman: There is a certain glamor as- sociated with firefighting, but Charles "Dee1' assistant fire marshal with Police1 Department, thinks there is a litlle more to it than Uiat. Snell, who celebrated Ms 32hd year with the fire depart- ment June 15, returned Mon- day from the annual Fire- men's Training School at Tex-, as University the last of many trips he's made to the school in the. past 32 years. He will retire from the dc-. partnient after Jan. 1. "I'SIGNED on; as a rookie fireman; in Snell said. .''Pay was quite low in those, we did get expert jjistruction from expe- riencedvfire did not have any formal training such as'is offered at Texas Snell said he learned his job the hard way, by gaining, ex- perience on-the-job training. "I never had any hard les- Snell said but I did have some close calls that I was able lo get out of. When a falling wall barely'misses you, you learn right quick how to avoid getting in that situation again." Snell rose through the ranks during his, career, as an Abi- iehe fireman, his last promo- tion coming 19 years ago when he was advanced from Fire Captain to Assistant Fire Mar- shal. "Pay forJirerneh has been improving all Snell said. "I recall that'i made a month when I was a rookie. New firemen now make about per month starting sala- ry." SPEAKING OF raises, Snell recalled the day iri 1944 when the Abilene City Council raised the salary .for. firemen to ?135 per month. "That was a pretty good Snell said, "but the councilmcn told us .never to ask for another raise, because was all they would ever be able to afford." He said equipment firemen to combat fires has also improved over the years. "Probably the greatest im- provement has come i nthe booster "It is better built, better equipped, and can handle more water than the older models." The booster Iruck, he said is used for smaller, fires, and is used as a "fire first-aid" vehi- cle, serving'-, asi .the horse" of the fireliouse fleet. DUTIES include investigations of fires. He said that studies made after fires show that about 98 per cent of all fires are caused by care- lessness. you investigate a he said, "you look for call the 'hop .spot' that, area fire start- ed. in ihe. burns in wood, things like this identify, lhe: hot spto." Snell said he begins to-sus- pect arson when peculiar odors are present, or if he indication of more than one spot" in'a J'ire-dam- aged "We classify arson in, four Snell explained. "The most frequent 'arson case develops when someone' starts a fire for insurance pur- poses. Then we have the 'spite where' someone starts a fire when someone else." "Another type of arson is found when a 'fire, pyrpmaniac, starts a lire. These are people who start fires impulsively. The fourth classification; deals .with the arsonist who starts a fire to cover another, crime, like a robbery or murder." Siiell sal dfire investigation has become a, science, .with s'e v e r a 1 different samples, from .burned-wood to soil bt- neath trie structure', being lab- oratory tested.'. "We.in the Fire Marshal's Office have ihe power of ar- Snell said, "just like'the When we have deter- mined that arson was involved arid have a good suspect, we arrest him and place him in jail." By JOE DACY H Reporter-News Staff Writer An unconTirmed tornado sighting m Potosi and rainfall ranging from 01 inch at Mu- nicipal Airport to J3 at Dyess AFB were the results of Thursday's thundershower. ac- tivity, more of which is ex- pected National Service forecaster Darrell .'Crawford said Fnday morning that'a 20: per cent chance of rain still exists for the Abilene area- Crawford said a low sure trough to tie northwest Of Abilene became a front the Department Safety could find no damage m that area, but did find a Bell Telephone, Co.'- lineman who said a large dust- devil. Forecasters have all along, that tornado activity.is possible wherever ;heavy thundershowers form. -The main drenching'.from A'b iTe'n e-'s storm, Thursday seemed to be to.the west and southwest of the ra- dar indicated' In. contrast to Tuesday's showers, which left the city with 1.28 inches of '.water, Dyess AFB caught most of Ihe rain this lime with .83 inch. OFFICIALLY, however; Ab- ilene's s; rain total was in- creased only .01 inch, bringing Ihe yearly total to 8.87 out of an .expected; 14.53. rain for.the area v have' fluctuated between. 20. 30 per cent since Monday. Merkel also reported sub- stantial 'rainfall, .1.10- inches' Thursday. Crawford' said.. -Thursday's shower was a large one, ratli- cr than one of the .isolated, mile-wide sprinklers known lo occur in the summer. ,Rain reports 'included Ho- .Jan, .25; .32; and Colorado City, .40 with other communities reporting lessee amounts. WHIfiE IT RAINED ONE QUIRK'of J sh'ower activity., was noticed near ...Colemah on: a Branch .-was deluged. with i.more' ..four Although 'Colemari itself, re- ported only .40, Knox Camp- bell said his 'property ab- wiggle around in the i inches -adding (hat atmosphere spawning scattered ABILENE i his stock tanks "are 'running' oven" Municipal. Airport a mp b'ell A the front' Is Total for Tear -..those expected to 'move, Crawford said it should remain in Normal for Yea'r 2Mt Butternut. 2318 River Oaks .05 LEON :'EASTLAND-HAMLIN TR whose.' ..crops '.-.-wers this summer. ence 'for '24 to "48 hours and then dissipate or "become homogenous with the' rest of the N. 2nd Treadaway Hamby Sewer Plant 'NE.Water Plant TR .26 TR LAWN .20 .03 wllil i U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Rain chances are AFB Map, ABILENE AND VICINITY (10-mHe said because the temperature in. the uppper -atmosphere Abiiehe; Lake Phantom .36 Porllv cloudy with-': a "slfqM chance or IhundershovJers today through Saturday. Soirtherly 'winds s to 10 rrph only five to 10; degrees, Kirby 4. norlherly tonlghl. High .nils aflernoQn Tn the low. 90s: Low tonlglif tha n the surrounding air, near; 70. Hiqh Saturday In Hie upper 80s. 'of rain 20 per cent" enough to create the- Ihrough Sulurday. J sary and lor 14 hours ending t and 67. As for that and taw same dale last ycarL orct nado in Crawford tcday: lonlgM: Sunrise ftiSi. Dean Sentence 1 to 4 Years WASHINGTON mer-White House-counsel John AV: Dean in was sentenced (b- day to four years in prison for his role in the Wat- ergate coyer-up Dean, the principal witness State Said Probed AUSTIN The FBI is investigating" 'conditions' t state schools for the mentally retarded :in Abiiehe and Atty.. Gen.: Lan'y, York said Thurs- day. York said each of -the schools had -been visited --by in.tlie.lasl.mpnlh. "To my knowledge their in- .quiry. has been of a 'fairly broad nature, dealing' with various aspects of treatment, and .not any. specific inci- York said. flie Austin.Americari-State's- man said today the Justice Department .reportedly re- quested the FBI to make the inquiry, after receiving allega- tions about program and treatment inadequacies. The paper said that If.the Justice Department decides -to file the -case reportedly will be built around the contention, that institutionalized residents have a constitutional right lo treatment and Texas .has failed to provide that treat- ment, adequately. Abilene Slate School Supt. Bill Cain confirmed Friday that the FBI-has visited the facility in connection with an unspecified complaint filed against three state schools with the Justice Department in Washington. Cain said the Investigation, spread over several weeks, "was an open and above board j against President Nixon in the "cover-up, pleaded guilty eight to corisspiracy to obstruct" just Ice. U.S. District Judge John J, -Sirica gave Dean until Sept. 3 to put his affairs Sirica said he recom- mend' that Dean serve his sen- tence in the.minimum security prison at Lompoc, Calif. Sirica handed sen- tence after denying a- request from 'sentencing be delayed.... .Dean's attorney said a new :balch of White House tapes being- handed over to Sirica under a Supreme Court order 'issued last month contain evi- dence which might -suggest a Dean. The charge to which Dean pleaded guilty last October carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a Sirica said he was giving Dean a month before begin- ning his sentence in part be- cause of the illness of Dean's mother-ih-law. was. said, "I realize, the wrongs I've.done...but .to say.I'm sor- Dean pleaded guilty Oct. joining a'.conspiracy .designed to limit the original Walergate investigation and keep it away Ironi the door of the White House. Dean has beeir cooperating special Watergate prosecutor's office since short- ly before he was firied by Pre- sident' Nixon. but he plea'd'guilly to one count of cpnspirapy to obstruct -justice, lie'ss' before ?the5 Senate '-Water- gate committee last summer. In five days of nationally. broadcast; testimony he icribed; his 'atjendance. at meetings where 1972 plans to wircjap the; Democrats .were discussed and said he believed !nat the .'President knew 'the original Watergale investiga: tibn was to be covered up Local-Weekend Tips Suggested "The Weekend Scene" takes a .tour of pew clubs and restaurants, reviewing things-to do over the week- end for Abilenians and va- cationers .in the city. Pg. 4B. NEWS INDEX Amusements 7C 58 Bridge .'V.; 8A- Classified 1-8D i 9C Edi'tprrqls............ 4A Horoscope................ 8B Hoipitol Pptienls 6A 8D Sports Good Heallh 7A Tro'vcl 6 7C TV.Log................ 5C Women's News 2-3B Touchy Negotiations Cited For Prison News Blackout BY JIM BARLOW Associated Press Writer HUNTSVTIXE, Tex. (AP) Prison, officials negotiating, at- the main state prison with armed convicts who' hold 13 hostages clamped a news blackout over the talks today' Prison spokesman Ron Tayr lor said bargaining with in- mate Fred Gomez Carrasco for release of the hostages "continues lo increase in sen- sitivity and detail." Taylor said there are "inherent dan- gers to the lives of all the Dog Trucks Not as Hot as They Look to BLUE RUCKEB Q. Wty arei't there iiy nofs the Aiimal CMtm tracks? I saw M to nuke the a ttttfc more ewnrtrta- Me M tkdr ride U the 4caU ebambtr. A. Animal Shelter's Jimmy Fv-rri 'says (he animals aren't in there very min- ules, at the most.'Fprd thinks the sim. on a tin r6of would be: even hotter'than no roof at all. The idea of a completely enclosed truck has been tossed around but since they would require air-con- ditioning' and the new enclosed trucks would be quite expensive the idea didn't gel very far. Wouldn't that be classy, to hail from a city with air-conditioned dog-catcher wa- gons? Q. Isn't there anything a person can do prevent browiimg of UK grass by Ihe function of pels and visiting and cats? A. Tf you can, get lo the spot right away with the gartien hose, flood it to dilute the ammonia: (Some shoveling may be neces- sary ammonia causes the brown spots. If you don't water immediately, you may as well forget it because ammonia works fast. Spraying the lawn with Black- leaf 40 is supposed lo keep cats and dogs from visiting your yard. May H I mailed a cbeck ttr.t KMl-Ald advertisement M (he back ef the Ktcf Aid envelope. I seit a smlllig pHeher and sets of smlllig mngs. Ii JRK we ROt the pitcher awl later the check cleared the baik. Ii late June 1 wrote the office askiig "why M I've received an answer nor Ihn mugs. Moieywlse, I'm out II.H the dlsappdntmnt Ii my children Is nostly my CMccrn. A. We dropped a note to the Smiling Mug people asking for either an explanation, the mugs or a refund. They've probably re- ceived thousands of orders, our guess is there's a computer problem somewhere or a clerical breakdown. For sure, there's a mis- take. Wait a week. 1C a letter from Action Line doesn't bring forth the mugs, call the Better. Business Bureau (877-8071) for a complaint form; Action and the BBB combined usually bring results. Q. My sister warts a package seillo brr by United Pared Seryke bit the oily phoM mnbtr Ihteii h hi Ubbock. Do'I to can Ubbock It arraige for the shipmeBt or cai I call somebody here ii AbHeie? I cai't It by IMS, she wails U deflvered to her office. A.' Abilene United Parcel Service office d.oesn'1 have a large enough staff to keep the office open all day. It's open one hour in the morning, the rest of the day they're out delivering. The Lubbock office is larger, is designed to handle orders from points in New Mexico and Texas. Call (806) 747-0131 collect and the package will be picked up at your house, delivered to your sister's office. Q. Are there aiy gymiastics pro- gram hi Abltae other thai In the schools? I Itre Lawn, coiW drive Ii for M afterMOB or evraiig class. A. YMCA has two tics for introduction to the differ- ent skills involved in gymnastics, and a competitive gymnastics team. Junior and senior high classes meet on Tuesday after- noons from 4 to 5. New sessions start after Labor Day. Check with Mike Osborn at Ihe Y, 877-8144. Address qiestlois Actloi Lite, Box .11, AMkie, Texas 7MU. Names will ml be ised bet qieslkis mist be slgBtd and addresses Please iichide. lelc- pboM Mnbcn If possible. hostages" where' "negotiating points are given public expo- sure interrogative debate arid Taylor said prison aulhori- ties would have no more to say about' Iheir' discussions with Cairasco talks which were scheduled to resume to- day. The third floor library where Carrasco and his rap- t i ves are ho.led up was plunged into darkness around dawn ..when lightning the library's power source.' Taylor said the power fail- ure would.have no affect on telephone negotiations with Carrasco which have been publicized on many occasions by Kathy Pollard, daughter of one of the hostages. Taylor emphasized iliss Pollard, who has learned of negotiating de- tails through telephone con- versations with her mother, speaks for herself, and the prison will have no comment on her reports to newsmen. She read several messages from Carrasco to newsmen and prison authori- ties were receiving, the mes- sages about a half hour before she made them public. Miss Pollard, 24, said her mother, Novella her they were making a car- of every statement Ciir- rasco was sending tr? pvision officials and giving them lo her. She said slic was being spokesman' aHyr mother's re- quest because; felt the whole story was not being put out by TDC officials. a powerful underwtirld narcotics chief'serving a ;iife .sentence for assault to murder, had de-: mantled that an' armored truck with a telephone and a shtlrt wave radio be placed in the prison court yard outside i Hie education building. He and two fellow inmates hold (he the third floor library. Carrasco wants lo lake four hostages with, him in the Ifuck and release the other nine once he and the others are safely inside the truck. Carrasco, said Miss Pollard, has decided to his three female hostages Mrs. Pollard, Elizabeth Bcseda, 46, and 43. -The fourth would be Father Joseph O'Brien, a Boman Catholic priest. "We have volunteered to ac- company Carrasco and his said a state- ment. signed by the three women. "We arc aware that this is the only way oul of this building and we feel our chances for survival lie in this plan and his plan only." A statement by Father O'Brien read: "I agree tn continue my position ;is hostage for the safely of the majority of those held hostage."   

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