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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, July 31, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 31, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                gpbttcne "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 94TH YEAR, NO. 44 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JULY 31, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Price 15 Cents Associated Press (xP) The Water'sFIHE! Tuesday aCleniooti's rain seemed to make everyone in the Big Country happy, including these youngsters splashing their way into Ihe rising creek water at Gill Park. Mark Watson, son or Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Watson of 114D Blair, waits his turn as his brother David, left, and Michael Eft, son of Mr. and Mrs. David ECf of 1133 Blair, jump in. (Staff Photo by Gerald Ewing) Rain Scattered, Despite Intensity Strange World Aspirins Blamed For Gibbons' Ulcer 'By JOE II Reporter-News Staff Writer Foil o w i n.g a 1.28-inch drenching on Tuesday, 'tore- casters at the National Weath- er Service said Wednesday that more rain'might come on Thursday. Weatherman Jack Schnabel said the normal drying-out pe- riod, which usually follows a West Texas thundershowcr, has a 20 per cent chance 01" being interrupted Thursday af- ternoon and evening. Although Abilene received a king's share of the rain, which turned streets into rivers, outlying areas and even some portions of the city in Ihe south and tputhwcst did not. get as much rain. TUESDAY'S accumulation al Abilene Municipal Airport brings the official total for the month to 2.20 inches; for the year, to 8.86. Normal for the WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Notional Wfeirticr Service (WMIftcr Mop, Pq. 10-A) ABILENE ANP VICINITY (10-mile radius! Clear lo parUy cloudy Iwfny ond Portly cloudy with o slight chance of afternoon era evening-thun- TTiwsdoy. Southerly winds 5 to 15 increasing Thursday. High 1hJs afternoon and Thursday [n Itie lavt- tr Ws. Low tonight 70. probability of roln on Thursday 20 per cent. High and low for 74 hours ending cm.: 64 end 67, High wid low iome date losl year: 37 end 67. lodav sunset tonight: Sunrise lomwroW: motuli is, 2.31-; for I lie year, K-56 through Wednesday. City writer department cliicf Bill said Wednesday, however, that runoff from the rainstorm was apparently neg- ligible. In fact, he said, Lake fte Phantom lost a tenth of a Where It Rained ABILENE 2-Day Total Municipal Airport 1.2S Total for Year 8.8S Normal for Year 14.46 517 Mockingbird 1.40 2318 River Oaks Cr. .20 517 Glen haven 1.40 2041 Bullcrmrl 1.15 10''6 Cedar 1.12 3936 Slate 1.30 Dyess AFB .04 Lake Abilene .Oil Lake Phantom Hill TR Lake Kirby .50 BLACKWEU, .50 BROWNWOOD .25 CLYDE .60 COLEMAN .40' COMANCHE .12 DE LEON .30 DUBLIN .15 HASKELL TR LAWN .15 I.UEDERS -SO MERKEL TR NOODLE .50 PAINT ROCK .30 ROTAN TR SN'YDER TR Sfl'EETWATER TR WINTERS .20 foot Tuesday, down lo feet above sea level. "I. can't figure it lie said. ''Maybe tliey'll (jet some runoff before the day's over but I doubt it." The in-Lowu vain, therefore, apparently will not affect Abi- lene's water supply. SCHNABEL SAID, thai while it may have poured in Abilene, "we'were lucky" to gel all tire rain we did. Only one or twto thundershowers were reported in the area by radar Tuesday, he said. The coverage of these thun- derstorms in the West Central Texas area was about 20 or 30 'per cent, as predicted. Schnabel stressed that when a probability of rain is issued by the weather service, il re- fers primarily to Ihe amount of ground or area the rain might cover, rather than Ihe amount nf rain which may Jail. SCHNABEL SAID, However, that southeasterly winds may push a weak cool front back toward Abilene from its sta- tionary perch in southern Tex- as. In addition, moisture from the High Sierras of Mexico, reported by salellile Wednes- day morning, is apparently trying lo move inlo Hie area.. Ta. (AP) Euell T. Gibbons, author of "Stalking Hie Wild Aspnva- gus" and one of the nation's beslknown advocates of natu- ral foods, lias an ulcer. It's not IhaL lie's been eating too many dandelion greens or drinking loo much sassafras tea, the 63-year-old Gibbons hastened to explain after dis- closing his ailment on Tues- day. He said he has been tak- ing loo many aspirins for an arthritic condition and, ac- cording to his doctor, they caused the ulcer. Exotic Bird Sounds Disturb Equipment ATLANTA, Ga. erii Airlines lias won a seven- year battle to combat a mys- I e r i o ii s force which was knocking out sensitive tele- phone equipment used by llic ticket counter in the Regency Hotel. Officials said ticket agent Susan Gavalis noticed Hint the telephone trouble coincided with the shrieks of exotic birds in- the hotel lobby cock- tail lounge. Technicians discovered that the shrieks were of the right tone to shut off the complex telephone equipment. The tele- phone frequency was changed lo anolher range and the trou- ble ended. Ehrlichman Rebuked, Handed 20 Months WASHINGTON (AP) For- ni c y presidential assistant John D. Ehrliclinran was sen- tenced to a ininiuiuni 20 nionlhs in prison today on his conviction for conspiracy and perjury in the Kllsberg break- in case. U.S. District Judge Gerhard A. Gesell set. 20-monlh lo five- year sentence to run concur- rently for cacti of llic three criminals counts for which Ehrlichman was convicted. G. Gordon Liddy, a member of the White House plumbers unit which carried off the break-in, was given a. one-lo- three-year sentence, hut it is to run parallel with other sen- tences handed Liddy in the original Watergate break-in case. Thus it docs not add any lime to what. Liddy already liad lo serve. Gesell said two oilier ccm- victed members of the plumb- ers group, Mianiians Bernard L. Darker and Kugcnio K. Martinez, "wcve duped by high government officials" and gave them suspended sen- tences. Hirliclinian, until April 30, 1373, one of the closest mem- bers of President Nixon's in- ner circle, slood before Gesell just before sentencing and said quietly: "Your Honor, I believe 1 am the only one in this courtroom wlio really knows whether 1 am guilty or not guilty, 1 am innocent of cacti and every one of those counts." Answering briefly, called the break-in at the of- fice of Daniel Ellsberg's psy- chiatrist one of the most "shameful episodes in Ameri- can history." Gesell said that among Ihe dcTcndanls, Ehrlichman had violated (he liigli inifilic trust that went with his position in the While House. Carrosco Ignores Own Deadlines IIUNTSVILLE, Tex. (AP) Fred Gomez Carrasco ordered breakfast and morning news- papers today, ignoring his 8 a.m. deadline to blow up one of 13 hostages al the main stale prison unless Jio received three bulletproof vesls. "We dnn'l know what t.o think" said prison spokesman Ron Taylor. "Anolher dead- line went by with no action." Prison officials said they planned new negolialions wilii Cai'rasco, a rebel convict along with two other inmates, has held the hostages in the prison librarv for a week. Taylor said Carrasco never mentioned passage of the deadline and prison authori- ties did not raise (he subject. Carrasco, 34, had threatened lo blow up a woman caplive unless prison officials met his demands. Late Tuesday a Texas Dc- p a r t in e 11 i of Corrections spokesman said the demand for the vest had been rejecl- cd along with Carrasco's pro- posal [or five prison officials to replace 10 of the 13 host- ages, who include three other prison inmates. Jusl before sentencing Ehr- lichman, Gesell said to him, "You're a lawyer, and among the defendants you held the highest posilion of public Irusl and the major responsibility for this shameful episode in Ihi; history of our country. "The Constitution was ig- nored, the rights ot citizens were abused, the EUsberg fed- eral prosecution was tainted and bad to be dismissed by Judge (Matthew) Byrne. "Falsehoods and conceal- ments were employed lo tliwarl lawful inquiry into this Gesell added. Ehrlichman told an improm- lu news conference, outside of Hie courthouse that "justice will be found and done and that I will ultimately be exon- erated and vindicated." Klirlichman repeated the de- fenses he attempted to raise at Ihe (rial and again charged that Judge Gesell had erred in not allowing him to present them all to the jury. "All people who are in gov- ernment are constantly re- quired to balance the interests of an individual against the larger interest of tire country as a the former While House official said. "Tliere was a balance of lliat kind involved in Ihis Ehrlichman said and contended that Gesell should have allowed him lo plead na- lional security interests were involved in Ihe plumbers oper- ation. Ehrlichinan plans an appeal and Gesell freed him on liis own recognizance. Noise Ever Increasing The increasing problems of noise pollution, created by more machines, will ap- parently drive the decibels up to intolerable levels by the year 2000 unless some- thing is done, says o noise expert. Story on Page 1-B. NEWS INDEX Amusements 5C Briiiqe 1 1C Business Mirror 2A Classified 7-1 1C Comics................ 6C 1IC Hospital Patients IDA Obituaries 6B Sporls............. I2C To Your Good TV Leg 5C TV Scout 5C Women's News 2-3B Dealers Busy Pumping During Gas 'Shortage' By The Associated Press Gasoline shortage? Don't (ell that to dealer Art Paul. He's out tlicvc pumping into Ihe night. "Sell, sell, sell that's what the companies are lolling us said Paul, taking a break Tuesday night at his Los Angeles station lo com- ment in Ms capacity as presi- dent of the Gasoline Retailers Association of Southern Cali- fornia. Paul is among some dealers around the country who report that even tlioiigh television commercials are still plugging conversation of gasoline, the companies are filling service station storage tanks with gasoline allocations equal lo or exceeding those of "Every dealer in Southern California is gelling as much or more Ihan Paul claimed. He said that lo his knowledge, in Southern Cali- fornia. Mobil is supplying 105 Highway Dept. Checks Longstanding Bl ELUE RUCKEK Q. Why the check of visiting cars to Abilene from Texas Highway Dept. persMnel? I've been slopped in aiy slate I've visiled and I've been hi almost all of them in the past years. A. "It's a matter of enforcing the driv- er's license and registration says Bob Townsley, director of Motor Vehicle Division of the Texas Highway Depart- ment in Austin. Some slates, he says, have ports of eri- have roadblocks to check li- cense and registration but every slate has some .means of determining whelhcr a person has beconrc a resident of a stale birt [ailed to register his car in Ural slate or'purchasc a current driver's license. If a non-resident moves lo Abilene, docs not register his car here, he can escape city, counly and stale taxes. The random checks have been going on in Abilene and all over the stale for many years, says-Townsley. Q. I need the address of I bo. Secre- tary of the Liars Club, Burlington, Iowa lingers in my mind, maybe (hat was (he site of one of their meetings. A. The address no lie is Burlington Liars Club, 309 Henry St., Burlington, 53165. Once a year the club holds a contest to Jind the World's Champion Liar. Q. Wbal, If anything, can a person do about drivers who swerve toward a person riding a hike down the street? My son was riding down S, 2Jrd when a young man swerved deliberately to- wards him. My son wasn't hurt (his lime but who's lo say about (he next time? A. Take down (lie license number then phone tiro police department. This is a dangerous practice. II may seem funny lo the driver but one little slip of the wheel could cause a death. If Ihe police have a license number to work with they can track down the driver and give him a slern lecture. Q. Why aren't (here any karate classes here for women? There are plcnly of classes for men and boys but of all the people who need to know Ihe art of self-defense, women do. I'd Ihink (he YW would have them. Will (hey ever? A They did once upon a time uiUil tliciv highly-qualified instructor opened a studio of his ovyn. Give Marcus McDowell a ring al American Karate Studio here. He oilers mixed self-defense classes men and women. He feels since women rarely at- lack other women, the training is more realistic if women learn wilh men in Ihe class. Thai makes sense. Q. Why docsn'l KKBC-TV Channel 9 carry Ihe }like Douglas Show in Ihe afternoon? I got it when I lived in SI. Louis, It's a very good show. A. The show's in syndication which means the networks are no longer running distributor bought it and offers iL for snle to various television stations. Out of about 300 shows in syndication, KTtBC buys 10. They buy Hie ones they feel will be enjoyed by the majority of people in Ihcir viewing audience. Address questions to Aclion Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 79C01, Names will not he ustd but questions must be signed and addresses given. Please In- tlmlc (clcphonc numbers if possible. per cent and Standard 109 per- cent of 1372 deliveries. Dealers who liked the idea of limiting hours to ge[ home for dinner or even take a Sun- day off for fishing are finding themselves back in Ihe thick of competitive sales. Ileporls from Southern. Cali- fornia arc echoed at least in Chicago and Miami, according 10 survey by The Associated Press. Some oil companies ad- mit Ihe accounts of higher supplies and selling pressure are accurate. A Union Oil spokesman put 11 this way: "We have, not forced Ihe dealers to stay open longer. AVe have request- ed them to return lo the oper- ating hours they had prior' to the problems of last and early this year. The rea- son is lhal more gasoline is available now and we want lo be able to take care of the motoring public." In Maryland, dealers report- ing said deliveries were run- ning from a low of 80 per cent lo a high of 120 pev cenl of 1572 levels. Arkansas dealers .said they were gelling about 90 cenl of 1972 allocations. The American Pclroleum In- stitute, an industry trade or- ganization, said in Washington I hat gasoline slocks are slight- ly higher than a year ago, while demand is slightly low- er. No one immediately had a certain answer for reported variances in allocations, al- though Paul said that the heavy concenlraUan of refin- eries in Southern California rnighl be a local plus and that some regions might be slight- ed. in Southern California, some companies call up at lire ond of the monllr and say, 'Hey, we've gol another load of gas for And we don't even want il because we've gol enough and it's not. worlh it to work 24 hours all Paul said. The American Automobile Association said gas prices were running on a nationwide average of 56 cents a gallon for regular and 60 ccnls a gal- lon for premium. The API denied, reports that gas prices are being supported al unnecessarily high levels by a reduction in gasoline pro- duclion. II said increased gas pro- duction would have to come from additional imports of nil and would cost more than gas produced from domestic cruds oil so production increases would not reduce the prica. API said average daily gas production from U.S. refiner- ies increased from about 6.2 million barrels in April to more than 6.8 million barrels iii Ihe first three weeks of July. Also in Washington, Treas- ury Secretary William E. Si- mon said that in his view re- tail gas prices could drop 
                            

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