Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Abilene Reporter News: Monday, July 29, 1974 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 29, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE'SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 94TH.YEAR, NO. 42 PHONE 673-4271 MONDAY EVENING, JULY. 29, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Price 15 Cents Associated Press (JPI BLUE RUCKEH Class Schedules Too Lengthy to Print Q. With about high school stu- dents registering soon it surely would help if you could print for us in your beautiful newspaper the schedules for botb Cooper and Abilene High. It's rather difficult lo try in plan svhat to take when you don'l know whether two courses arc held during the same time or not. Please help. A. All riglil but can't print all those schedules, in our "beautiful" paper, it would lake a full page. Cooper students may clieck with the counseling officer after Aug. 5.- The handbook containing class schedules hasn't been printed yet. Abilene High Registrar's office has Hie schedule posted right now or AHS students can talk with the counselors about it. Q. A house in my new neighborhood (S. 33rd St.) has two junk cars and a van in the front yard and (wo old cars in the hack. They're a real eyesore to an otherwise spotless neighborhood. Bo zoning, laws prohibit such "collec- tions" in. Abilene, as they do In other cities, or neighborhoods such as mine have lo live with Impromptu. "parts supplies" or shade-tree me- chanics? If the cars do .not have cuireiit plates and a current sticker, building inspectors at City Hall will tag tliem, owner will be given 10 days to get rid of them. After 10 flays they'll be hauled away to the city "aiilo pound." Building Inspector Jim Hargrove thinks lie's seen .this particular yard and as'recs if sticks out like a sere thumb. He'll get something done. Q. Our city manager and his admin- istration re'commcndert [or dumping equipment iii the new budg- et'. A number of us are '.rendering if the city is sUll going to put dumpsters In our alleys that we voted against. They're far more dangerous Ihan empty refrigerators. They're a hazard and if the city gets sued, who pays for It? The taxpayers! A. The is for pin-chase of land and: equipment to operate a new landfill. "There's no relationship between the. opening of- 'a new landfill site and 'a change to the container says City Manager Fred Sandlin. The present landfill sile is "filling up" and running over so another site must be found. Incidentally, the garbage containers are rot airtight like a refrigerator, therefore not dangerous from that standpoint. Q. I want to build a dune buggy. I have (he frame hut I need information on iliffcrent bodies. Where do I find lhat kind of information? A Check with Marvin Smith at Smilly's Auto Supply on N. Mockmgbivd.ov Terry's Auto Supply on Arnold Blvd. Both have catalogs for ordering bodies fit a Volkswagen chassis which we assume you're using. Q My Iwo friends and I arc very big Heywood fans. When we heard they were coming for the fair we started wondering if (here was some. way we could meet them either alter the show or before. When do tickets go on sale and can we buy them al the coliseum? A. Bo Donaldson and the Ife.ywoo.ds are appearing in two free midway shows nightly, Monday.'Sepl. 9, and Tuesday the 10tii. The first show begins at dusk. You do not need tickets. Probably we can work out some way for you Terrie, Cindy and Becky to meet the rock group. We'll lie in touch with details. The group has two singles on the charts now, "All Over the and "Just for .You." Address questions to Action Line, Box 31, Abilene, Texas 1WW. Names will not be used hut questions must be signed and addresses given. I'lease include telephone numbers if pos- sible. Party Chairmen Differ Sharply Taylor County's Demo- cratic and Republican Par- ty chairmen have express- ed sharply different opin- ions on the House Judiciary Committee's resolution rec- ommending President Nix- on's impeachment. Story, Pg. IB. Amusements 8A Bridge.................. 9A Business Mirror 9 A Classified 4-8C 3C .Editorials Horoscooe Hosoifol Potienls.......... 7 A Obituaries 2A Soo-ls -r- Your. Good Health......46 TV Loq 8A TV Scout............ 8A Women's News 2-3B Sitting Cool Steven Babb, left, a'licl'Cfayton'. Mouser enjoy a break from-100-phis temperatures. The hoys don't know, how ice.is. made, hutxthe 50-pound block's- cooling abilities is all that interests Photo by.Bill Herridgej High Temperatures Haven't Increased Ice Demands Here By BILL IlEIiniDGE Reporter-News Staff Writer When the July .temperature starts inching over the century mark, 'Abilcnians talk about ways of staying cool. .Shannon Cox says one of the best ways is to use ice lols of it. Cox is president. of Independent Ice Co. of Abi- lene, but since his plant has been running pretty .close to capacity, a lot of Abilenians must agree with him. Cox has been in tlie ice busi- ness for 25 years. His plant can produce 50 Ions of ice dai- ly, and he said he is running pretty close lo thai. "ODDLY E N 0 U (i he said, "the current high' tem- peratures .haven't placed an increased demand on ice pro- duction. The trend in ice con- sumption sees heavy usage up to July 4th, then it peaks and slays at about the same lev- el." .He said that people buy bulk ice for water coolers, ice chests and the like for use on summertime picnics'. By the lime the 4th of July rolls' around, most people are tired of "roughing it" COX'S PLANT, which be be- lieves was built about 1925, is now the "watering hole" for construction crews, who pur- chase block-ice for their water coolers. Most of his howcv- cr, is found in what he terms "luxury ice" crushed and. bagged ice sold Ihrbugl; area covenience stores. With all those cooling chunks of froaen -water stored in ,Cox's plant, he explained how the stuff is made. "We utilize the same freez- ing tanks' here thaj were origi- nally installed in the build- he said. "Wo pump city water into and cir- culate a coolant .consisting of ammonia, Frcon and calcium chloride. he "lo make Ihe ice clear, used a low-force air jcl to continually blow air through tlie ice. DuriJig the final hour or two of production, we-pump out Ihe water not frozen in the center of the block, and pump fresh water." THE LATTER, slop, he: ex- is taken to remove chlorine and -other ties" from the ice, since they are Ihe last to freeze. "1 get many calls from la- dies wanting, to use ice for parly Cox said. "They Want to know my se- cret for making Clear ice. 1 tell them about the air circula- tion, much to iheir disappoint- menl." Although more, modern ice making equipment exists, Cox said has -somewhat antiquated plant is sufficient for produc- ing ice to fill this, area's de- mand. "There is only one basic way to make he said, "and [hat's by freezing it. We do updale our packaging, transportation and conveying methods almosl on n yearly basis, bul the basic production method is still good enough for WHO with his father and brother-purchased tlie ice .planl in 1950, said inflation lias caught Ihc ice industry just like, everything else. "The cost of producing ice has just about doubled in .re- cent he noted. "I have been able to gel ammonia, the principle ingredient in my coo- lant, for about 19 cents- a pound. "When you -add-rising fuel cosls, electricity cosls, and other expense increases, ice production gets to be prelly expensive." It's hard to imagine getting 30D pounds of anylliing for less than these clays, but for that ten-spot you'll get lhat much ice and a lot of change. And in the face of Ihc current "lieat wave" "gripping West Texas, Ihat's a lot of cooling for a 102 degree day. Huntsville Hostage Crashes to Freedom Bv JIM BARLOW HUNTSVILLE, Tex. (AP) One of 15 hostages leaped through a glass door and stumbled down a series of prison building ramps lo safe- ty today while three armed convicts watched but did not shoot. Henry Escamilla, 40, one of four prison inmates who liad been held with Ihe other cap- lives since Wednesday, broke out about a.m. GOT, just before daylight." Escaniilla was rushed to surgery al a hospital, bleeding profusely from lacerations on Ihe head, shoulders and arms. Doctors repaired cul tendons in his arms and said his prog- nosis was excellent. He was under heavy sedation and una- ble to immediately talk to prison officials. Shortly after Ihc escape, Ihc leader of the armed trio, Fred Gomez Carrasco, said lie could have shot Escamarilla bui didn't. He did not explain wliy. Kseamarilla had been sitting on a bookshelf in an enlryway leading to the glass door in the prison library. Carrasco has rotated his hostages dur- ing the six-clay ordeal, always keeping one in front of the glass door to deter any sniper attempts by prison sharp- shooters outside. The predawn dash broke the calm from an overnight lull in negotiations between prison officials and Ihe amied con- victs. Carrasco suid previous- ly the standoff could end to- day in Freedom !or the rebels. Negotiations between Car- rasco and prison officials were lo resume about 10 a.m. CDT, following breakfasl. lion Taylor, a spokesman Mental Unit Wonts Hedge on Inflation for the Texas Department of Correction, told newsmen ear- lier as negotiations with the convicts recessed Sunday night, -'No decision lias been matte on any release." Carrasco, leader of Hie Ihree-imuale group holding the huslage.s in tlie third-floor li- brary of the prison, told news- men earlier Sunday evening by telephone thai "things are looking up." "I believe if I do have an opportunity lo communicate with him (Castro) by .tele- phone. I do.believe the man will give me Carras- co said in his thick Latin ac- cent. In the past. Castro has not welcomed criminals with open arms, bin he has never publi- cally condemned them or turned them away. Under Ihc Aerial and Sea Piracy Pact, Caslro theoreti- cally will have to turn away hijackers, but has not yel done so. The United Slates has not yel invoked (he pacl. The director of the Abilene Regional Mental Health and (MH-MR) Center said Monday that lie will ask Taylor County com- missioners for a in- crease in the county's contri- bution lo the center. The money, a total of annually, will be part of (hi matching funds necessary Air the center to qualify for in- creased stale aid; Director Wes Borders said the increase, which "barely hedges' is being asked of all the sponsoring agencies, 'Abilene City Coun- cil, Stamford City Council, Taylor 'County commissioners anil Callahan County commis- sioners-courts on a pro rala basis. THE "CITY of Abilene also will be asked to contribute an additional lo bring its contribution up lo. or a lotai of from the'coun- ty, he said. The funds, Borders ex- plained, will be used lo match other funds from various sources and could allow the center to increase its annual budget from S4S3.00D to Tax dollars from the locul units of government comprisa only 8 per cent of the center's budget, he said. IK ALL TIIK localities con- tribute the increased amounls, 'Borders said Hie center will be eligible for all of the approved for the area by tha Texas Legislature through the state .MH-MR agency. The court also is expected lo- consider microfilming of cnml records, acceptance nf a des- ignated county road lo lie pro- posed by Abilene attorney Charles Scarborough, the ap- pointmcul of election judges and alternates and an elevator contract for Ihe old court- house. Indicted WASHINGTON' (AP) mer Treasury Secretary .lolm B. Connally was indicted lo- day by a federal grand jury on charges of bribery, perjury and obstructing justice. The indictment said Connal- 1y accepted in cash from a milk fund official, .lake Jacobscn, in exchange for recommending that federal milk price supports bo in- creased. Jacobsen. an official of Associated -Milk Producers Inc., also was indiclcrt on a charge of giving an illegal payment to a public official. In -all, Die grand jury cited Connally, a Texas Democrat Republican, on five al- leged violations of federal law. Rain Clouds Hopefully ill Go 'Up the Chimney' By JOK DAC.Y II Reporter-News Staff Writer Uain ami more of it than a few sprinkles may be a welcome visitor to the liig Country Monday, Tuesday and possibly Wednesday, forecast- ers at Ihe National Weather Service said Monday morning. Weatherman Jack Sclmabcl said a weak cool front is drift- ing toward Abilene, now "poised lo Ihe east of Lub- he said. He explained, however that the 5- lo 8-degree cooler air is not a front in the winter sense of the word and accounts for a 30 per cent chance of showers through Tuesday in a different way. "IT IS SETTING up this chimney he said, us- ing an which de- scribed the .92 inch of rainfall earlier in July. Forecasters in Ihe summer look more al Ihe convergence of winds at the lower levels and the divergence of winds at Ihe upper levels lo predict rain, he said. The cooler air. lie said, 2nd ment Article Drafted WASHINGTON (AP) A second impeachment article accusing President Nixon of violating the Constitution and his oath of office was drafted .today by a bipartisan group which seemed certain lo .ob- tain-its approval in the House Judiciary Conimiltee. The panel recommended Saturday lo the House of Representatives thai Nixon be impeached for the Watergate cover-up. Dcbale on the'second pro- posed article was' delayed somewhat as drafting contin- ued. Committee leaders were expected to press for a final vole by evening. The redrafted second article was to be presented to the committee by Rep. William L. D-Mo. It included five itemized charges and a conclusion that: "In all of this'Richard M. Nixon has acted in a manner .contrary to his trust as Prcsi- dent and subversive of consti- tutional government to the great prejudice of Ihe cause of 'law'.and justice and to the manifest injury of the people of the United Stales." The five charges were that Nixon: personally and through subordinates lo gel confidential income lax infor- mation' from the Internal Revenue Service. the FBI and Se- cret Service by directing or authorizing them to wiretap for purposes unrelated to na- tional security. Ihe so-called Plumbers unit "financed in part with money derived from campaign contributions which unlawfully utilized Ihe re- sources of the Central Intelli- gence Agency." to take care lhat Ihc laws were'faithfully exe- cuted by failing to act wlicn he knew or had reason lo know that his close subordi- nates endeavored _lo impede or frustrate lawful inquiries by duly constituted executive, ju- dicial and legislative entities concerning the unlawful entry into the headquarters of the Democratic National Commit- tee." cxeculice power by interfering with the FBI, Watergate special prosecutor, criminal division of the Dc- partmenl of Justice, and CIA "in order corruptly lo impede the due and proper adminis- tration of justice." Democrats had not reached agreement Sunday on what specifics to include in the sec- ond proposed article. Bul Ihe compromise emerged loday before the scheduled a.m. opening lime for Ihe committee's na- tionally broadcast public tle- The compromise did not in- clinic any mention of con- tempt of Congress for refusal lo supply subpoenaed (ape re- cordings. That now was expected to be taken up in a proposed third article. Chairman Peter W. Hodino, n-N.J., hoped lo gel a vote on the second article by the end of the day. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NolionoL Weather service (WMlhtr Map, Pg. 7A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (lO-mlle radius) Increasing cloudiness wilh a chance ol Inundcrshowcrs tonlghl and Tuesday. A little cooler lonlQhl and Tuesday. Southerly winds S 10 15 mpil becoming norUiv.cslcrly 6 to 12 mpn tonight and Tuesdoy. High today In jhe unnor Ms. Low tonight rear 70. High Tuesday In the low Ml. Probability of ro'm 30 PC-' ccrtl loday, lDnlQ.nl and lursday. Hrgtl and low for 34 hours 9 o.m.: 10] and It. High and same dale last year: 93 a nd '70. Sunrise loday tomorrow: supposed to set a up a kind nf chimney flue in Ihc atmos- phere over or near Abilene as Ihe slightly-cooler mass of air settles in. Wilh tlie heating from Ihe sun. warm moisl air will con- verge at the "damper" of the "flue" and then rise through Ihe chimney lo Ihe cooler lev- els of Ilic upper atmosphere forming clouds, and possibly welcome rains. Skyrocketing temperatures and the lack of cool air have prevented Ihis from happen- ing, he said. Conditions are "I n o k i n g more favorable than we've in the few weeks. As a matter nf fact we should see general rain or a chance of moderate showers at least to- day and possibly through lo Schnabcl said. A difference of only five de- grees, 71 behind Ihc front and 76 in front of il, will make Hie difference, he said. TIIH FRONT differs from its winter counterparts in lhat it is not, driven by a pressure system, "doesn'l have much and will bring scat- tered, though numerous, thun- dcrshowers. Schnabcl described Ihc shower activity as "scattered" bul not and more numerous throughout the Big Counti'y area. Temperatures should be slightly cooler, peaking al about 1011 and dropping to as low as 85 around Ihundershow- crs. The cool air, he explained, is important because it sets up the pattern. Warmer temperatures .may re-occur after ttii! front's ef- fect is spent, -Schnabel said,   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication