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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: July 22, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 22, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                gbflene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 94TH YEAR, NO. 35 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY EVENING, JULY 22, TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS iorialeil Press Fast Relief From Heat Colin Gregory planned a 'slip into the water1 easy, but the slide at'Zoo World put the surprised look on his facias he.picked up speed. Colin, son of. Mr. and Mrs. Harold of 1757 Lincoln Dr., was. one of many young Abilenians .seeking relief from the 100-degree 'weather of the past few days. (Staff photo by Gerald Ewing) No Word Received On Halt to Cyprus Fighting BY THE ASSOCIATED PUKSS The deadline for a cease-fire on Cyprus passed today but there was no immediate word from the Mediterranean island on whelher the'fighting" had actually slopped. Just hours before Turkey was reported pouring fresh troops in by air. Al the 4 p.m. 10 a.m., EOT deadline the Cyprus radio broadcast an order for Greek Cypriot troops to slop shooting. The broadcast was heard in Beirut, Lebanon. Earlier in the day both Greece and Turkey announced that their forces on the island would observe Ihe United Na- tions-sponsored cease-fire. At U. N. headquarters in New York, officials in contact with the United Nations peace- keeping force on Cyprus said they had received no reports of continued fighting after the cease-fire deadline. The officials declined, how- ever, to make.any official an- nouncement that the cease-fire had become effective through- out Ihe island. An Associated Press dis- patch from Nicosia received Just before the 10 am. dead- line reported that massive Turkish reinforcements had been alnded on the beaches of northern Cyprus today. It re: ported that paratroopers were brought in by at least 12 Turk- ish C47s, and at least 30 heli- copters ferried troops from landing vessels. The dispatch went1 through Greek Cypriot censorship 'be- fore being transmitted, and it did not say' what lime Ihe reinforcements had arrived. Associated Press corre- spondent Holger Jensen re- ported from [he northern port of Kyrenfa, 45 miles from Tur- key and 10 miles from Nico- sia, that heavy fighting was going on three hours before the ceasefire was lo begin. Jensen, who was later cap- tured by Ihe Turks along with (wo other American corre- said Turkish jets were bombing and strafing Cypriol positions as both sides fought to improve their positions. South of Kyrenia, Greek Cypriot artillery shells burst Amusements AC Bridqc 48 Business Mirror 4A Classified 6-IOC Comics 5C Editorials............... 6A Horoscope 5B Hosoilol Palienls 8A Obituaries 2A Sporls .1-3C To Your Good Health ......4B TV Log 4C TV Scout 4C Women's- News 2-3B along the top of mountains where Turkish troops had dug in. AP photographer Paul Roquo returned lo Nicosia from Kyrenia with the.report that he saw two Turkish de- stroyers bombarding Hie port city. The cease-fire was an- nounced first in Washington by the. Stale Department, whose emissary', Undersecre- tary of State Joseph J.' Sisco, shuttled all last week and over the weekend between Greece and Turkey in search of a set- tlement. Turkey announced al annul a. EOT, that it had agreed to the cease-fire and the Greek military junta an- nouiiced its agreement about two hours later. Associated Press corre- spondent Frank N. Hawkins Jr. reported from Nicosia that the boundary between the Greek and Turkish sectors was relatively quiel. He said Turkish jets hit targets the city and its airport al dawn, but Ihe raids were light compared to (he massive strikes Saturday and Sunday. At least one FIDO fighter, was reported shot down, Hie I8lh Turkish plane claimed by Ihe defending forces. Hawkins said the Greek and Greek Cypriot forces appeared to be holding their Panel Will Debate TV The House Judiciary Committee is preparing to vote on .whether. its historic impsachmeril ,'dc- biile should be televised. The debate'begins Wednes- day and could'last into .next week. i A' change in House rules would be needed lo allow the television cameras into com- mittee sessions fnd a resolu- tion proposing the change is scheduled for House .action fhortly before the committee "meets this afternoon. At an earlier closed session, the committee receive a arguments against im- peachment .presented by Sam Garrison, newly designated by the. Republican committee members as' their minority Albert Jenner, who had Ijcld I hat position from Ihe si art of inquiry, while Garrison iened as-his deputy, will ye- main on the staff as associate counsel working under special counsel John Doar. Jenner had made it clear from the start of tlie proceed- ings that he regarded himself a" working for the committee, not the Republicans, and Ihey have repeatedly turned to Garrison when they felt Ihe need for partisan services. The Republicans' patience with Jenner, a "prominent Chi- lawyer, 'snapped Insi week when Jenner endorsed Doar's conclusion that Nixon Vtart abused his powers of of- fiie and should be impeached. Heat Bearing Down In 'Pressure Cooker' By JOE DACY II Reporter-News Staff Writer A smothering high pressure system is expected to continue to send temperatures soaring near 103 degrees at JcasL through Tuesday, forecasters al the National Weather Service said Monday. Weatherman Jack Schnabel said a warming trend, which te- gan Thursday, is the result of a high pressure ridge centered over all of the area east of the Rockies. Schnabcl called the weather pattern "stagnated" and said the outlook Tor the next five days is the same, "The 'height' of'the atmos- phere has increased and is com- pressing and warming the Schnabel said. This pressure cooker effect began to be noticeable Friday when a high of 96 was recorded. Saturday's high was 33; Sun- clay's high, 102. SCIINABEI, SAID there is lit- tle hope that (lie system will budge. "This time of year there, is very little movement ill sys- he explained. As a'u example, Schnabel said the height of the ridge is meters and will drop only one about three feel, by Tuesday an amount Schnabcl called insignificant. A drop in the humidity has also added to the broiling sun's effect and southerly winds are not expected to cool the area much with a five to 10 mpli breeze. 'We do have a weak system approaching from the northwest, now in the Texas Sclinabel said..-. He-_rsaul.that i( the..system "holds its "identity" through and passes .Uirough the Abilene area, the progress of the healing process should slow 'but it won't cool us Weather Service records show that the record high for July is 104, set in 196J. ABILENE'S WATER usage apparently remained steady dur- ing the hot weekend willi a con- sumption of 36.o million gallons WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Natlonol Service (WeaHwr Map, fg. I-A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (ID-mile radius) Clear 10 partly cloudy and continued ho1 rhrouph'Tuesday. Southerly Winds 5 to 10 mph. High today and Tuesday near 103. Low lonlqhl In Ihe mid 70s. High and low for 24 hours ending 9 a.m.: 103 ond 76. Hiqh ond srime dale lasl year: 93 ond Sunrise lodar: sunset tonight: sunrise tomorrow: of water on mil- lion on Sunday. Northeast treatment plant op- erator John McGuire said Mon- day that about half of this came from Lake Hubb.tnl will) 1G.4 million Saturday and 17.4 mil- lion Sunday. The city has contracted for about 465 million gallons of Hub- bard water per month lo aver- age 15.5 million a day, city wa- ter department head Bill Wccms said Monday. Weetns said that even if the summer heal continues and no rain comes, the city will not face a water crisis. The rising temperatures will apprentlj" put an even greater burden on area farmers and ranchers. The heal, said Taylor County extension agent 11. C. Stanley, is exacted lo continue to burn pastures and enhance the pros- pects for range fires "unless people are real careful." EVAPORATION FROM slock tanks is also expected to be a greater problem, he said. Taylor County Judge Roy Skaggs said Monday he has heard no word from Texas Gov. Dolph Briscoe or from U.S. Secy, of Agriculture Earl Bulz as to the progress of the county's dis- aster aid request, which was mailed last Monday to Washing- ton, D.C. Senator to Make Career Decision COCOA BKACII, Flu. Sen. Edward J. Gurney, un- der indictment by a federal grand jury, says he. will de- cide this week whether to seek rcnomination in the Republi- can primary in September. "The general consensus is that I could win the liepubli- can primary. The ficncnil election is s different he said Saturday. Gurney, a member of Ihe Senate Watergate committee, was indicted earlier this month on charges of conspira- cy, bribery and perjury in connection with a fund collected, secretly by builders seeking influence with the Federal Housing Adminis- tration. The 60-y c a r -o I d senalor pleaded innocent to Hit charges last Tuesday. Two Men Survive Crash Into Creek By BIU, 1IERU1DGE Reporter-News Staff ll'rilcr TWO Abilene men .escaped serious; injury Monday morn- ing after the pickup in which -'they were" riding crashed through a retaining barrier, flew more than 5S feet in the air, and landed on its lop in Elm Creek.. Glen Leroy Wallace, 31, of 402 Arnold Blvd., driver of the vehicle, and his passenger, Larry Wayne Wheeler, 24, of 2632 S. llth, were trapped in the vehicle for about an hour before rescue workers freed them from the wreckage. THE TWO MEN were rushed to Hcndvick Memorial Hospital by Kllioll-Ilamil am- bulances, where Ihey were listed in satisfactory condition Holiday morning. The pickup was traveling south when it veered off (fie road and onto the guard rail just past the S. 14th SI. exit from the Winters Freeway. More than 70 feet of guard rail and seven steel posts were de- stroyed before Ihe vehicle bo- came airborne and crashed in the "creek 30 feet below, said. The accident was reported lo Abilene police by Ihe De- partment of Public Safety ra- dio dispatcher al a.m. Both viclims were in the emergency room al Hcndrick by 7 a.m. Officers estimated damage lo the guard rail and posts at The pickup was a lolnl loss. THE LOCATION' OF the ac- cident has been the scene of five such accidents in as many years, nearby residents wit- nessing the wreckage remov- al, said Monday morning. The lasL such accident, which occured llarch 13, claimed (lie life of Jimmy Waller Farnsworlh of Ilamlin, ivhen his semi-trailer Icfl Ins road and crashed inlo creek. One of 2 Perjury Counts Against Reinecke Dropped By JANET STAIIIAR Associated Press Wrtler WASHINGTON (AP) One of the two perjury counls against California LI. Gov. Ed lleinecke was dismissed today by U.S. District Court Judge Harrington D. Parker. Bui Parker denied a defense molion to granl a judgment of acquillal on n second count as Ihe defense prepared lo begin ils case loday. The count dismissed al Ihe Pre-Dawn Jogger Wakes Up Dogs IT BLUE RUCKEB Q. For nine monlks I lived for Ihe last day of school so I could sleep lale li (he mornings. So what happens at every morning? Joggers, Not In the .street or Ike park, not In Ihe school yard just a block.away but right In my alley! Now I think peopfe ought lo take care of their bodies, be physically fit aid all that iwt why in (he alley? They wake up every dog hi Ike block. My dog starts barking, the dog next door starts harking and tbc dog en down the way and the dog on down... Help! Just because they rise and ihhK at S a.m. (hey Ihlik the whole world is up. Wky, in my own home, am I not entitled to sleep as lute as J want? A. First off, let us say there's no lord high commissioner who regulates jogging in Ihe alleys, 'parks, streets or school grounds. So forget about committing your jogger lo Sing Sing. You could Iry tacking friendly liltlc notices on Ihe back fence advising your jogger neighbors to try the park. Next tack up nol-so-friendly notices. Next maybe just tacks period in the alley would discourage your health-minded friends. Or a bear trap. Q. When were the last pure silver dollars minted In the U.S.? A. Ninety per cent silver dollars were last minted in 1935, says coin Dealer Buz Sawyer. No silver dollars were minted between '35 and '71, then in '71, '72, '73, "14 collectors could purchase 40 per cenl silver dollars from the mint for apiece. But the silver dollars we gel from the bank now don't oven have a dime's worth' of silver in them, only copper and nickel. Q. We have a farm about IV miles south of Abilene on Highway 36. I.asl week we had a grasstire that could hnvr gotten out of control if i( hadn't been for our neighbors. Anyway, the operator connected me with the fire department and they said they would "try" to get it (ruck ont here. About 15 minutes later (key called back, said they couldn't come. We were told (o can Merkel, Clyde and finally Abilene Fire Department. It sctms we arc out of all their districts. Jnst who do we call when our house is burning down? A. Best we can figure, you're in Calla- hari County and the Callahan County Judge says for grassftrcs (o call the Coun- ty Commissioner in Oplin or the fire de- partment in Clyde. Botti have fire trucks that fight grassfircs. House fires arc an- olher .story. For houses on Ihe county line, Judge Charles Dyer says you should use Abilene firemen. The sheriff's department or any county official is authorized to call out Ihe Abilene Fire Department for house fires. (J. Where can iny children gel a baby raccoon for a pet without buying one in the pet slorc? A. You could gel a (rap and catch one, we suppose. Game Warden Dale Evans suggest Ihe "Have a Heart" wire trap since It won't harm the animals. Sardines make good bait. He feels that any rancher wouldn't mind a trap near his bam since there are lots of raccoons around (earing up feed sacks. Bcticr'bc sure to get the rancher's permission firsl, though. Kecms as if it would be easier just to buy a raccoon but on second thought it wouldn't be nearly as much fun. Address questions to Action Line, Box Abilene, Texas Names will nor he used but questions must he signed and addresses given. Picas- In- clude telephone numbers If possible. request of defense, attorney James E. Cox alleged that Heinecke testified falsely to the Senate Judiciary Commit- tee two years ago when he said he had no way of know- ing whether former Ally. Gen. John N. Mitchell knew of a financial commilmcnt by a subsidiary o f International Telephone Telegraph Corp. lo the 1972 Republican Nation- al Convention prior lo July 31, 1971. Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-.Mass., a meniber of the'Ju- diciary Committee, asked Ite- necke about Mitchell's knowl- edge .of Ihe ITT pledge white the panel was considering Ihe. nomination of Diehard G. Kleindienst to be attorney gen- eral. 'The question is put some- what Ihe judge said of Kennedy's question. Cox had argued that Kenne- dy's question specifically called for an impression. "It was vague and uncertain and that question called for an Cox argued. The one remaining count against Reinecke accuses him of lying to the cornmiltce ahoul when he first discussed the convention site wilh Mitch- ell. lieinccke told the committee thai he first discussed San Diego as a site of Ihe conven- tion in September 1971 after an out-of-eoiirl sclllcinent of an ITT antitrust case. Hut the proscculin contends that Heinecke discussed convention wilh Mitchell in lelephone call on May 21, 1971. before Hie ITT case was set- tled. The ITT case was re- solved out of court in July 1071. I'arker said (he remaining count had enough merit so Ihiil a jury should decide on it. The judge's ruling on (lit: two counts was made before the jury entered the courtroom. Several weeks ago the spe- cial p r o s e c u I o r 's office dropped another perjury count against Heincckc, saying it would have been necessary lo call former While House aide II. II. Ilaldeman as a witness if the charge were pressed. Ilaldeman is slated lo go on trial Sept. 9 in the Watergate cover-up case. Thai count alleged thai llc- necke lied to the Judiciary Commitlce when he said he firsl discussed the possibility of bringing the 1972 Republi- can convention to San Diego in April 1971. lleinecke told Ihe Judiciary Committee that on that dale he was in Washington and at- tended u social reception lo promote economic develop- ment in his stale, "and we discussed Ihe possibility al. Ihal point and (hat was where the idea was really hatched." The charge remaining against Rcincckc carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a fine of   

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