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Abilene Reporter News: Friday, July 19, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 19, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE'SKEtCH YOUR; WORLD EXACTLY AS IT ?4TH .YEAR, NO. 32 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, EVENING, JULY 19, 197W THIRTY-FOUR PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Aitociatfd Prett (iP) Retiring ..Dr. H. Clyde Smith.retires ..today as director of Sears 'Memorial Methodist Cen- ter, and also is completing '-'a 5i-year-miiiislry with the Methodist. Church. He and 2942''Spilth.: 'S'l. I'g. IB. Plans Visiting Although retired, Dr. II. Clyde Smith plans to tome back often to the Sears Memorial Methodist Center and visit the friends he and his wife, .Velma, have made over the years. Visiting in the Center's cafeteria are, left to right, Ur. Smith, Mrs. Tom Mrs. W. F. Jones, Lillidee Powell and Mrs. Richard Ward. (Staff photo by Jonny Cates) Cosmonauts End 2-Week Flight MOSCOW (AP) Two Rus- sian cosmonauts safely re- Soyuz''i4 a'' .livb-Vveek mission aboard the Salyut; 3 space >station, Tass leported. the government'news agen- cy said cosmonauts Pavel .Po- .pdyich .and Yuri Artyukhin well" after their ;Soyuz transport ship near TJzheziazgan in Asia.- Their- mission, which began. July 3, .has been'. ''fully ful- The mission's successful and fi.safe conclusion- was; in 'sharp to. the, tragedy of the Soviet space effort in June 1971 when, after 23 days aboard 1, three cosmonauts were found dead, strapped, to the 'seals of their Soyuz. 11 craft. Railroad Yard Blast, Fire Cover 2 Blocks; 78 I njured DECATUH, 111. (AP) -An explosion and fire engulfed a two-square-block area of a '.massive railroad yard today. Hospital officials said 78 per- sons were injured and a dozen 'were hospitalized. A dispatcher for the Norfolk and Western Itailroad said the explosion tore through a build- ing used for overnight sleep- ing by rail crews. Three hours after the initial explosion, the fire was still burning. A spokesman at the Decalur Memorial Hospital said that 25 injured persons were brought there and two were, admitted. At St. Mary's Hospital, a spokesman said 53 persons and 10-12 admit- ted. Fire fighters were evacuat- ing homes in a two-block rad- ius of the yards, a sprawling complex east of Decalur, and said more explosions were possible. The caase' of the explosion was not known. Most of-, the injuries "oc- curred as residential windows shattered with the a.m. blast, officials said. Glass damage was prevalent over a wide area, police said. Authorities said a boxcar containing dynamite was pulled clear of the fire after an alert yardmastcr notified fire fighters of its presence. All available fire-fighting equipment in Decalur was on the scene, officials said. A Norfolk and' Western dis- palcher said as many as 24 railroad employes 'were be-- lieved injured- by -lire .and flying debris. He said the ex- plosion-occurred near a build- ing 'used by crews for over- night-sleeping. He .said the explosion appar- ently originated in a chemical taiik car, but did not know its contents. Switch engines were at work In the area when the explosion was touched off, he Otber cars containing vola- tile materials still were in the area, the spokesman said. Fire officials said trucks and crews fron, 11 outlying fire districts were summoned to fight the fire or provide standby perfection for the city. New Physicians Arrive at Dyess The shortage of doctors in the military will be less ocute at Dyess Air Force Base with the arrival if sev- eral new doctors and more scheduled to. begin serving at the Dyess AFB Hospital. A story and picture-on Pg IB tells of plans. NEWSINDE1 Amusements 4-7B IDA Business Mirror........ 5A Classified 4-1 1C Comics ..................9B Editorials 4A Horoscope 2A Hospital 'ion Obittraries 1 Sports To Your Good 6A Troyel TV.Los 6B TV Scout............ 6B Women's News 2-3B Deficit Funding Due For Athletic Costs By JOE DACY II Reporter-News'Staif Wriler The Abilene Board of Educa- tion voted tentative approval Friday to a proposed athletic budget which would require deficit to be made up, in part, by budgeting from the general tund. School Supl. Harold Brinson said expenditures were "up slightly in all areas" primarily because of equipment price in- creases and travel expenses. The proposed budget notes an expected revenue of from ticket sales, parking rent- als and loui-naments- I1IGII SCHOOL rootball would receive' the most money if the plan is approved, fol- lowed by basketball, track, tennis, swimming, pirls track, volleyball, golf, Abilene High School would re- ceive more than Cooper High for football, more iai1 baseball, more for track, less for tennis, less for golf, less for girls track. Equal amounts would be allo- cated for swimming, volleyball, and basketball. Brinson said the differences in allotments for sports between the two high schools were pri- marily on account of "cyclical" equipment costs. SINCE MAJOR equipment purchases, such as for jerseys and shoulder pads, are not made at the same time at each high school, expenditures often "leap- frog" each other over Hie years, he said. added that the number of students going out for certain sports also affected (he .pro- posed allotments. Prospect of Rain Departs Forecast Chances of rain vanished from the Abilene forecast Friday as a familiar summer weather pal- tern took hold over the state. National Weather Service forecaster Darrell Crawford said a high pressure system cen- tered in the southeastern portion of the country resumed it's dom- ination of the slate. PREVIOUSLY, the system had shifted eastward slightly al- lowing for the chances of rain Monday through Wednesday. Now, however, Crawford said the "Bermuda High" is circulat- ing Gulf air into the area and preventing Ihe intrusion of a low pressure system far to the north. The phenomenon, he added, is normal for summertime. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT Of COMMERCE National IWcllhtr Mlf, IOB) ABILENE AND VICINITY (10-mile redlus) Clear 10 parllv ttiro-jnh Saturday no Important Icmperrrture chonges. Southerly wind 10 to 20 mph. High today and Saturday in Irie mid 90s. lonlghl near 70. High and low (or 74 hours ending 9 a.m.: 72 ind 70. Hioli and lo.v some rare lost vw: 9X and 73. Sunrise today: sunstl {enlghl: tomorrow: Increases over last year were recommended in all areas ex- cept volleyball and swimming, which remained the same. The largest increase was for However, Brinson pointed otil lhal the recommendation "held the line" in virtually all otticr area.s-, including the alol- ted for junior high scrril sports and for elementary sporls. The only item increasing in Ihe area of general expenditures was for gymnastics from to TOTAL EXPENDITURES for the sports program are expect- ed to be an increase of over last year. Although was budgeted to take care of Ihe defi- cit, board members said they are relying on increased ticket sales to supply the extra money. Brinson said a "new enthusi- asm" in the Abilene High School sporls program especially would juslify the board's optimism in allocating Ihe same amount of money from the general fund for sports as it did last year. Hot Spot Now Private Club BLUE RUCKEH Q. What's the group of rock buildings out on S. Hlh east ol Klrby Park? My daughter and I were driving Mt there and she .said it's where they hold Ihe old-fashioned Mexican dances. Is.il open to the. public? You're talking about the old Charlie 'Blanks nightclub, currently named the Clo- 'ver Club" and before that the It'll Do, Club. Back in .the 1940s Charlie Blanks was THE swinging nightspot of Abilene and the popu- lar meeting place for college students turning for Ihe holidays. It's. a neat old rock ;building with rock benches, rock cubicles 'ringing a huge dance floor. You'll have a Ihard time seeing the inside unless you join 'the private club and the manager lells us no 'memberships' are available at Ihe moment. ,the club currently 'specializes in country- bands. Q. Yon Iiad article ii Action Line about a person' or organization in Ahi- lenc that had something with pub- lishing songs lor people who wile pocl- ty. Who do. I conlaci. Willard Kelton has.had some of her own songs published, fearried a few lessons the1 :hard way and said she was willing to give :advice. Hazards abound in the song publication business. You'd be wise to check with Kelton, she.can probably save you some rnohey and can definitely you on which companies are legit, which are nol. Q. Some disgusting are happen- ing in our restanraits and drive-ins when it comes ..to appearance ern- ployes. I know Texas has.'a health law prohibiting long! and loose hair aroowi food'establishments .so fsi't It en- forced? I've seen a complete pony-tail if a Coke cup-while fonnlaii girl was putting tee it. Surely wr health inspectors are mot so Miad they can't see this or the whoopiig (cotghJig) and sneezing, InU the- and coulters can be.shliy tat-.thardoesn't mean food dropped om them shocM be sold to customers (watch then, yon can actiallv see this befeg Please help all of Abilene In attempting lo cor- rect these grossly iiadeqnaled stand- ards of Inspection. A, Good grief, whcrcyfi'e you eating? Ac- lion Line may be blind but we haven't seen anything equal your experiences. Howev- er we did talk to Chief Sanitarian Gilbert Morris at the Health department and .he explained .a few'things. For one thing, .he says Texas.health laws merely say hair must be kept under'cbnlrol. and since this is Lso" vague it docs create problems. Inspectors are forced to depend :on cooperation from restaurant managers. Hair spray is considered adequate protec- tion! instead of Ihe old hairnet, but if man- agers would require a net or that long hair be pinned in back of Ihe head where it can't fall-forward, it would eliminate lots of prob- lems. Picking up food from Ihe floor, (hen pi ac-'. ing it on, a customer's plate is definitely a no-no. .Morris says he's never "witnessed such.1 With so and smorgasbo'rds the pubbc seems, to, 'he admits coughing and sneezing inlo food is a continuing problem, especially since health inspectors can't station themselves 24 hours a day at every restaurant in town. Most spols are checked every two nionlhs, trouble spots more frequently. If you can be more specific, Morris woulC appreciate hearing from you personally, (live him a ring al 692-5000. Your com- plaints will be investigated. In explaining the budget, Urln- son said, "On the things we feel there's no way to hold it, we've asked for an increase." He added lhal he Ihoughl Ihe budget was "conservative on the economic side." BOARD MEMBERS briefly discussed the possibility of hav- ing uighl games during the baseball season as a way'of in- creasing sports revenue. How- ever, several objections were raised. The measure, which would re- quire a change in district rules, might not he practical because of the weather, discipline prob- lems attendant with night games and student "enthusiasm" for classes following a mid-week board members suggest- ed The board also on Ihe increasing problem of a slate- wide disparity in spending be- iH-ceii girls and boys athletic programs. Brinson told the board mem- bers lhal the Abilene school sys- tem was ''ahead of the game" on thai subject but (hat "we can't let up on it." Auxiliary Pay Plan Tabled Q. In the last couple weeks wedding amonHcemenls In the paper have not toid of the bride's dress or attendant's dresses. I enjoyed reading of all Ihe many enters and styles of dresses. Why fe IMs Information left tut? It's just as important to the bride as other Informa- tion given. A. Gown descriptions were cut due to :ack of space and increase in the number of brides. Actually we're behind the limes in a way Ihe trend throughout (he country is elimination of wedding stories completely or lo charge a fee'for running them, which The Ueportcr-News .does not do. Check some of Ihe'othcr newspapers in the state; The Re- porter-News probably carries more wedding stories than any olher paper in Texas. Since The.Reporter-News docs feel wed- ding stories are of interest to participants, families and friends, it will continue to car- ry.them, just in briefer form. With shorter .wedding descriptions, more articles of gen- r-raf interest to many readers can be printed i Ihe woman's section. Address qnestloos lo Action Line, Box Tews 7N04. Nantes will not be nsed bill questions most be signed and addresses given. Please Include lei- ephone numbers If possible. i By JOE DACY II Ileporler-Ncws Staff Writer A plan to change the entire structure of (lie pay scale lor auxiliary school employes clerical and custodial personnel tabled Friday by the Abi- lene school board at a breakfast workshop. School Supl. Harold Bvinson said Ihe matter, which would in- crease the proposed budget defi- cit to and would add K total of to 690 employes' salaries, will be considered at a later date. Allison Kaonce, chairman of the committee which recom- r.'ended the changes, said imple- mentation nf Ihe plan was nec- essary to eliminate inequities in the current system, boost work- er morale and reduce turnover. THE INCREASES would, if fi- nally approved, apply lo cafeto- r i a, custodial, maintenance, transportation and c 1 e r i c a 1 workers. Koonce said the nine-step sal- ary scale would be calegOrized according to skills, volume of work required, responsibility, experience, formal education, tenure and availability of appli- cants for the various positions. The pay scale would apply lo about 40 per cent of the sys- lem's enlire work force. In the report given to the board, Koonce said Ihe low salary scale has produced a situation in which Iherc are "no applicants from which. to choose in replacement of custo- dians, cafeteria workers, bus drivers.and maintenance men." "An extremely high, rate of plus of 120 custodi- ans and 55 plus ol 265 cafeteria workers this two ex- amples, Koonce continued. He adder] that salaries for comparable jobs were taken into consideration and that the pro- posed salary adjustments should be "set at a more realislic and competitive level." KOONCE ALSO gave an ex- ample of one inequity in Ihe pre- sent system, noting thai maintenance employe with three years in the system is making 5103.50 per month more than a two-year man. A general, categorized pay scale would allcviale these prob- lesin, he said. -'Morale has really been 3 fac- tor for a number of Abi- lene High School principal Phil Boonc, who worked on the com- millce, told Ihe board. "Every- one's voice has been lie added. Brinson urged prompt consid- cnilion of the meastiire "in light of Ihe current minimum wage Jaw." Salaries under the plan would range from an hour to 54.40 an hour for all possible catego- ries, Koonce said, based on a 22-day work month al eight hours a day. A 90-day probationary period is buill inlo the plan, he added. Bank Sells Money As New Gimmick HOCKY MOUXT, N'.C. (AP) Wachovia Bank and Trust Co. tried a new advertising technique at its branch here. The bank reduced Ihe price of money by 10 per cent and sold to the earliesl comers. Over 200 persons lined up on Wednesday for a chance to buy 5100 in cash from the bank in exchange for Manager Bob Noble said the bank sold in the lirsl liour. Ihen sold an additional for 5 cent off. Nnble said no one was re- quired to open an account. He conceded Ihe sale was a publicity stunt. "We have so many dollars lo spend, we can pul Ihem in billboards or ra- dio advertising. This is somc- IhJng he said. Vacant Swim Pools Not in Stonegate Three abandoned pools dis- cussed in a front-page story yf Ihe Thursday evening Reporter- News arc nol a part of Ihe Stonegate development but on land adjacent lo Ihe subdivi- sion. French Robertson, co-owner with I-.G. flhodcs of the Stone- gate development in south Abi- lene, said Thursday the pools "have nolhing to do with Stone- gate." As reported in Hie story, Die present owner of Ihe vacant properly on which the pools were built is I.awson Ridgeway of Dallas, Tlie pools arc located ncress Hie street on two sides of !he subdivision, lying between il ind the Winlers Freeway, and west of Vaughn-Camp Park. Robertson said that ID or 12 years ago Allyne Bridge and an .associate engaged in real estate bought four acres from him, and several more acres from other interesls, to develop a swim- ming club. The pools were buill, along v.ilh fences, shelters and other facilities. Later, Robertson said (lie swim club ceased operations and was abandoned. "II was nol part of Stonegate. and never has Robertson said. The Reporter-News regrets the error,   

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