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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: July 10, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 10, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                Abilene importer WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 94TH YEAH, NO. 23 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JULY 10, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Assorlaltd frets Kissinger on Stand Today By MIKE SHANAHAN Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) Sec- retary of Stale Henry A. Kis- singer makes an unprecedent- ed appearance in a criminal proceeding today, testifying as a witness for Jolnl D. Ehrlich- man in Hie plumbers trial. F.hrlichman's attorneys called upon Kissinger to shake the credibility of a principal prosecution witness, David B. Yuung, who worked separately in the House for both Kissinger and Elirlichman. Kissinger, just back from Europe where lie consulted with NATO allies aljoul Presi- dent Nixon's Moscow trip, is expected to be under oath lor only a few minutes. A CIA official has testified that Young told him Kissinger and Ehrlichman in August 1071 had requested that the agency prepare a psychologi- cal profile on Pentagon Pa- pers figure Daniel Ellsuerg. Kissinger, at the Lime Presi- dent. Nixon's chief national se- curity adviser, is expected to deny ever asking for such a profile. The trial is in ils tenth day. There also has been testimo- ny in the trial that Kissinger was among those in the White House who sought to have E 11 s b e r g 's name smeared through leaks of derogatory information to sympathetic journalists. Ellsbcrg leaked the Penta- gon Papers study of the Viet- nam war to lie New York Times in June.1971, an inci- dent that led to creation of tlic plumbers, a special House Investigative unit of which Young was codireclor. Color Photos Helping Police Color photography has proven to be on invaluable addition to the Abilene Po- lice Department. Story and photo on the police photo section, Pg. 1 B. NEWS INDEX Amusement 6B Bridge 6A Business Mirror...........7 A Classified 4-9C 75 Editorials 4A Horoscope 5B Hospital Palienls IOC Obituaries 2A. Snarls I-3C To Your Good Health......6A TV Loq 6B TV Scout 68 Women's News 2-3B Arabs Lift Nine-Month Netherlands Oil Embargo to See You By BLUE RUCKEH Zoo World Players' 4-Show Lineup Given (I. I have been to see (he Zoo World Players twice and i( was delightful, hut even though I went to the early show once and the show the next lime, saw (he same show. How do you find on! when (he shows are running so you tton't see the same one each lime? A. Okay! We have answers by the iinm- ners. There are four shows being shown at Zoo World: 1. Kids Next Door; 2. Granny's Front Door; 3. Love Is Only Love; 4. In The Rood Old Summprlime. The shows arc at anil 9 p.m. and the schedule is Monday- 1 and 2; Tuesday-3 and 4; Wednesday-1 and 3; Thursday 2 and 4; Friday 4 and 1; and Saturday 2 and 3. This schedule will hold until the fifth show is introduced proba- bly around July 18. Q. How are County Grand Jurors cho- sen? I have lived here many years anil have never been called to serve on a grand jury. A. District Clerk, Irene Crawford, says this is a timely question since a Grand .Jury Commission was called for Monday. The way it works is, the district judge names five people to act as a Commission. Each of Ihose people then names four citi- zens to the Grand jury. Out of the 20 names Ihe 12 Grand Jurors are selected. Some- limes those chosen cannot serve for various reasons, but if all 20 are available they jusl take the first 12 names on the list. (J. illy child will begin kindergarten (his year and I would like (o know what shots he has to have. A. Onch! He needs the DPT series, polio and bolh kinds of measles vaccines. Q. I was wondering how many use (he city buses every day and if the energy crisis has caused any increase in riders. A. You would think so, wouldn't you? But Emmell Curry, transit supervisor, says not really. There arc about 450 to 500 bus users a day, same as before. Do you know if you can still buy MIA bracelets? If so where and how much do (hey cost? A. Yes we know, and yes you can, anil they cost for stainless steel and S3 for copper. Mrs. Ralph Harding of Ihe local volunteer group says that if you want one with the name of any of the three local men slill missing, call her. If you want another name write VIVA, 10966 LcConlc Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif. 30024. Be sure to include your return address, the specific name yon want (if you don't, have a specific name Ilicy will scntl you specify whether copper or stainless steel, how many you want and enclose the correct amount, of money. There arc.slill 933 names to chose from. Address questions lo Action Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas Names will not be usfd but questions must be signed and addresses given. Please include Id- f.nlwne numbers If possible. Secretary ot Slate Henry Kissinger greets his wife Nancy al Andrews Air Force Base Tuesday night upon liis return from briefing European loaders on Presi- dent Nixon's summit .meeting in [Moscow. (AP Wire- pholol CAIRO (AP) Arab oil ministers lifted their nine- month-old embargo against Netherlands today, and the Dutch port city of Rotterdam hoisted the flag over City Hall jn jubilation. "Apart from the favorable aspects it has for the Nether- lands economy, the Dutch gov- ernment wants to stress that this decision will stimulate the development of good relations between Holland and the Arab world, as the Netherlands has always the Dutch Foreign Ministry said. Aflcr the oil ministers lifted the embargo they approved World Without Watergate Suddenly Gone for Aides GAYI.OItn SHAW Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) For a month, While House aides have enjoyed. working in a world seemingly dominated by presidential peace missions abroad and the promise of economic initiatives at home. Then suddenly on a sultry summer afternoon, their world without. W at e r g a t e disap- peared. The aides found them- selves, in the words of one, wallowing in Watergate again. The House Judiciary Com- mittee released Tuescla y its Itelaled story, Pg. 9A version of eight of the Water- gale taped transcripts made public ten weeks ago by Presi- dent Nixon. The committee's version contained significant segments missing from the While House version. In one such segment, Nixon declared his aides should "stonewall it plead the Fifth Amendment, cover- up or anything else Some members of the Presi- dent's staff conceded they Crash Kills Two North of Albany ALBANY An Albany man and a McAllen man were killed and three other persons injured in a headon collision al p.m. Tuesday on U.S. 283 about seven miles north of Albany. Bob Ilebel Jr., son of Mr. and Jlrs. Iloberl Allen Hefeel of Albany, was killed when his car was in collision with another ve- hicle. Raul Garcia Ibanez of JIcAIlen was killed and Ibanez' wife and two grandchildren were injured. The grandchildren, Steve, 5, and Christina, 4, and Mrs. Iba- ncz were treated in Albany Hos- pital for minor injuries. Parenls of (he two children, who are from Oklahoma City, were not immediately identified. SIIACKfXFOni) COUNTY Sheriff Jack Riley said Wednes- day morning that llebel was driving south on the highway and Ibanez' vehicle was driving north. The cause of the accident has not yet been determined, lie said. Funeral services for Ilebcl will Ix; at 10 a.m! Thursday in Ihe Albany Church of Christ. Keith Schinnerer, minister, will officiate, Burial, will be in Albany Cemetery under Hie direction of Godfrey Funeral Home. Robert Allen IIclicl Jr., ]9, was born March 16, 1055, in l.aml) County, lit had been em- ployed by TUdgecraft Corp. in Breekcuridge for the past three months. lie is survived by his parents; Iwo brothers, Danny Lyu and Gary Lee, and two sisters, Ina l.orainc and Cynthia Lane, all of the home; maternal grandpar- ents, Mr. and Mrs. 0. C. Hawlcy of Slaton and paternal grand- mother, Mrs, Ina Webster of Lil- tlefield. Pallbearers will be Hilly Gene Morrison, Harold Vick, Steve Riley, Lee Garcia, Rusty Harris and Bill King. Ibanez' body was taken to Sai- ler white Funeral Home in Breckem-idge and will be trans- ported (o McAllcn, a funeral home spokesman said Wednes- dav. SWEEP OUT THOSE UHUSID ITEMS SWIEP IN CASH! With A WEEK-ENDER WAIT AD 15WORBS 3 DAYS 70 Additional worth No phone orders Cain in advance Deadline 3 pm Thursd No were jolted by the commit- tee's version. "I knew they were releasing their transcripts, but il slill came as a said one middle-level presidential as- sistant. "For five weeks I had been up to my ears in other things, and I was enjoying it. Now we're back down here again..." Anvlher aide who at lunch- time had been buoyantly ea- ger to talk about the missions to Moscow and Yalta, Cairo and Damascus, was unsmiling and grim by dinnertime. "It's like Ihe alarm going off when you're having a nice pleasant he said. While the mood in Ihe lower and middle levels of the While House was dark, Ihe top level of the While House slaff was attacking Ihe commillec's pro- cedures aggressively and de- claring anew the President's innocence, Press Secretary Ronald L. Ziegler accused the commit- tee of dribbling out ils im- peachment evidence piece- meal in a "hypoed public rela- tions campaign" designed lo prejudice Ihe public against the President. "They ought lo release Ihe full body of evidence together, all at once, and not in a piece- meal Xiegler told newsmen. Zicgler contended that the transcripts in their entirety and actions subsequently tak- en by Nixon show he is inno- c.ent of cover-up allegations. Other White House officials denied Ihe passage were de- liberately deleted from the While House transcripts, indi- cating presidential spokesmen may be preparing lo contend the omissions were mistakes resulting from a rushed tran- scription process. When Nivon released his transcripts April 30, officials said the President himseU had hours listening to tapes and reading transcripts while his.special counsel, J. Fred Buzliault, supervised the pro- cess of preparing .the (ran- scripls for release. Titizhardt suffered a heart attack last month and is recu- periling al his suburban home. He was unavailable for comment, forming an Arab torporalion with assets of billion. The location of the corporation and tile number of shares each country would hold will ba dis- cussed later, a spokesman said. The minister s then turned lo plans to invest million of their vast new wealth in industrial projecls, including a petroleum service company to prospect and de- velop oil fields, a role largely held now by the big Western companies. The decision Ij end the em- bargo was 15 minutes after the opening of a meeting of the Organiz-ilion cf Arab Petroleum. Exporting Coun- tries OAPEC. A spokesman said Ihe deci- sion was unanimous. Algeria had already broken ranks and announced after an OAPEC meeting in Cairo last month thai it would no lunger ob- serve Ihfi embargo. Replying lo newsman's question, the spokesman said the ministers had no plans lo discuss rcimposilion of the embargo against Ihe United States as Palestinian leaders suggested during an Aral) League defense council meet- ing a week ago lo ways to counter Israeli raids on Leba- non. Commenting on the decision regarding Holland, Oil Minis- ter Ahmed Z-iki Yamani of .Saudi Arabia siiid, "All the members were convinced the Dutch government's attilude toward Ihe Middle East had changed and lifting the embar- go was imminent." Egyptian and Algerian sources saiil bolors Ihe confer- ence Ihcy would try to con- vince other Arab states there Pope Paul Has Knee Ailment VATICAN' CITY (AP) Pope Paul VI canceled liis weekly general audience loday because of the recurrence of a knee ailment but appeared at Ihe window of his Vatican iipartmenl to bless the audi- ence crowd in St. Peter's Square below. "You must excuse me, am suffering more the 76 year old pontiff told the crowd. Vatican spokesman Federico Alnssandrini said the Pope was suffering from arthrosis of his right knee, an ailment affecting the joints. The Pope told the crowd the ailment limited bis movement, bill he wanted lo give his usual blessing. He walked in front of Ihe window unaided, but his voice was weaker lhan usual. II was Ihe tltird time this year that the Pope has been in. lie developed influenza in early March and three weeks later was confined to bed again because of recurrence of the flu. On the advice of his doctors ho pared down his usually heavy Easier Week schedule. was no longar any reason to maintain the Inycolt against Holland. Dutch diplomats have been engaged in a sustained, effort in recent months to. get Ihe Arab oil producing slates lo change their mind on the em- bargo. Despite the oil has con- tinued lo flow regularly into Rotterdam, a refining center for northern Europe. Consum- ers in Holland have experi- enced little inconvenience. Weather Pattern To Remain Same Weather conditions should re- main vulually the same for the fourth straight day, forecasters at the National Weather Service said Wednesday. The only difference in the forer'.ist for Wednesday is a slight drop in temperatures, no more lhan a few degrees, caused by fluffy cumulus cloud's rolling in after noon, said weath- erman Frank Cannon. "II's pretty much the Cannon said, adding that it was strange for [lie weather pattern to remain so stable for so long, especially in this area." running it into the he said, and noted that similar conditions existed before light showers dampened Hie city almost a week ago. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Njlional Winltirr Scrvite (Weelher Mop, PS. ltd ABILENE AND VICINITY (10-milr radius) Clear lo porlly cfoudy rhrojqri -Thursday. lemperalufe change. Southerly winds 14 lo 24 mph. Hign today find Tnursdoy in mid-Vih. Low lonlrjrit in low 70s. High and low for 2-1 liours ending I a.m.: lit or.d 73. Hiph ond loiv same date lost year: and 73. Sunrise loday: sunscr torifgllt: sunrise Young provided his testimo- ny last week in exchange for immunity from prosecution. The plumbers planned and carried out the Kept. 3, 1971, break-in al the Beverly Hills, Calif., office of Ellslicrg's psy- chiatrist, Dr. Lewis Field- ing, in an unsuccessful search lor Kllsberg's psychiatric rec- ords. Through his approval of Ihe entry, Ehrlichman, 49, is ac- cused.ot conspiring lo violate Fielding's rights. He also faces four counts of lying to Ihe FBI and a grand jury. Three others, Gordon Liddy, and Miamians Bernard L. Barker and R. Martinez, also are ciinrgcd In Ihe conspiracy cpnnl. In his final two hours of his own defense Tuesday, Khrlich- man was questioned about a series of inconsistencies te- Iwecn liis trial testimony and previous sworn testimony and documents. Generally, the former chief While House domestic affairs executive cited a bad memory for any conllicls. In Ihe closing minutes of his testimony Ehrlichman. was asked whether he knew Hint to examine Ellsherg's medical records someone would have lo get inside Dr. Fielding's of- Ebrlichman answered that, in 1071, "My mind just didn't dwell on the various possibili- ties. My mind didn't run over means and methods at thai lime." Ehrlichman has claimed in the trial lhat he aulhorizcd only a covert oper- ation against Ellsbcrg, not the breakin. Barker and Martinez, the two defendants who actually raided Fielding's office, also look the stand on their behalf Tuesday. Roth are veteran CIA agents who worked for a decade lu- ward the ouster of Fidel Cas- Iro's Communist government in Cuba. Barker and Martinez lesli- fied thai they were recruited for the break-in by E. Howard Hunt Jr., a 21-yea'r CIA veter- an, who helped supervise the abortive Bay of Pigs invasion in Cuba in 1DG1. Almost pleading with the jury, the two Cubans said they believed the break-in was nothing mqre than another CIA operation pulled off with the full approval of high-rank- ing officials in the U.S. gov- crninent- "I believed I was acting un- der legal orders and I slill talieve so loday after some of Ihe testimony I've Barker said. The last testimony is lo heard today. Final arguments and crucial instructions from ,Iudge Gerhard Gesell are scheduled for Thursday. It is likely the jury will be- gin deliberations Friday. A still unresolved issue is a set of four questions attorneys for Ehrlichman once submit- ted for written answers from President Nixon. Gcsell is slill considering how to handle lhal problem. Four Badges Lifted After Near-Shootout FOI1T WORTH (AP) County commissioners have suspended the commissions of four reserve deputy constables after 10 aimed law enforce- ment officers met in a con- frontation which one authority said could have resulted in gunfire. Southlake Police Chief Doug Hughes said, "We almost had us a prelly good shoolout. There could have been two or niorc people got shot if (Con- stable Bill Brown's men) had pushed the issue." Slate troopers broke up the confrontation which occurred early Friday. Hughes told commissioners one of his patrolmen stopped a carload of regular deputy constable, two reserve deputies and a civilian shortly after Friday midnight. He said the driver refused to show a driver's license and would not surrender his side- arm. Hughes said the other Iwo deputies appeared ready to tack up lhal decision with their guns. The civilian al one point tried lo pull a rifle or shotgun from underneath a car seat, Hughes said. Hughes (old Ihe commission- ers he believed his department could not back down on the arrest, so he finally convinced the driver to go wilh two high- way patrolmen lo Ihe South- lake police station where the driver was issued a ticket for refusing lo show his driver's license. County Judge Howard Green (old Brown by letter that a full hearing will be conducted Monday. He said he talked with the constable and "lie said he welcomes the hear- ing." There has been trouble be- tween Hughes and Brown for some lime. Hughes appeared before commissioners oppos- ing approval of a force of re- serve deputies for Brown. Hughes and other Southlake officials charged then thai Brown's men were setting up speed Iraps. llrown said he needed the unpaid deputies to control drug traffic and tights al Lake Grapevine. He asked for 30 deputies and the commission- ers approved four.   

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