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Abilene Reporter News: Tuesday, June 25, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 25, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRJENDS OR FOES WE'SKETCH YOUR WORLD. EXACTLY AS IT B4TH YEAR, NO. 8 PHONE 6734271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, TUESDAY EVENING, JUNE 25, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Associated Prtsa (fl CAI'T. JAMES POGUE rookie trainer BLACK, CHOKING SMOKE REDUCES VISIBILITY rookies keep their heads low Getting 'Heated Up' Part Of Job, Fire Rookies Find Slur Photo by Dan BloKKtr TRAINEES. APPROACH I-ARGE PIT FIRE hose water fends off heat By SUSIE STOLER Reporter-News Staff Writer Black clouds of smoke rise high off the prairie in Ihe ear- ly morning air as 13 firemen struggle with three hoses to extinguish a dangerous oil fire. The scene is.tibl an oil rig fire being battled by veterans but part of the final training required of a rookie group.of firemen in -the Abilene Fire Department. "Get a line over there. Come on, come in on yells Capt. James Pogue, training commander, as he puts the rookies through a rough.seven-hour .workout.. T11K 13 grad.- "uate from the program Thurs- day night, spend the last week of Iraining on a practice east at Fort Phanlom noad adjoining Ihe Northeast Water 'Treatment Plant. The present class is Ihe first rookie training group to- use the new simulator area, which was constructed. mainly by firemen during their off-duty lime. "When I became a fireman, we didn't have training. I feel al the end of this Iraining pe- riod, Ihe men will be able to fight any Pogue, a 21-year veteran fireman. Back in action after a five- minute break, Ihe captain or- ganizes Ihe .crew around two storage'tanks containing crude oil which the department buys for (he training program. "ALLRIGHT, I WANT Ihe left line lo come around Ibis side of Ihe he said, motioning, "and Ihe right crew to start over here. After the right line has finished wilh the first tank, it goes to the sec- ond, and Ihe left line slands over here to make sure Ihe fire doesn't spread back." Aflcr clarifying his inslruc- lions, the 'Captain opens a valve, and the storage lanks fill wilh "black gold." aunlher veteran fireman aiding the training ig- nilcs the' two storage tanks and the two lines of trainees move toward the blaze, with a third line standing by to back them iip. HEAT from Ihe fire forces :speclators unequipped with asbestos jackets, gloves and helmets to back off quick- ly as Ihe two tanks roar in flames. "We try lo make this as safe as possible, although il's cer- tainly not a safe thing. There haven't been any injuries, Pogue said during another break with his face black with soot from the dirty fire. Stubbornly, Hie Iwo lanks keep igniting from each other, as the trainees crouch close lo the ground approaching the blaze. Powerful sprays of water from a nearby fire truck final- ly overcome Ihe inferno, leav- ing two blackened storage tanks and (races of coal black smoke in Ihe air. The trainees' day is far from over. In a 40-minule period Ihe 13-member crew had extin- guished three large oil (ires including one originating in a. large concrete pit filled with crude oil. The department uses nil fires in Iraining courses for several reasons. In the West Texas area, fire- men are liable to encounter oil fires frequently, explained Pogue, who lias been Iraining rookies for three years. In addition, "Il's the best fire to have in order the get (hem used to protecting them- he added. Heat, smoke and flame are :the immediate.dangers of the "simulated" fires. "WITH THE WATEJl hoses in front of Ihcm, Hie heal doesn't really bolher Ihciri loo Ihe caplain said, add- ing he didn't know exactly how hoi Ihe fire would be. Two olher training obstacles include a junked gasoline lank truck and a butane storage problem. Previous lo the actual fire- fighting practice, the men had a course in fire science, hose handling, forced entry into buildings; mathematics. The eight weeks of rookie Iraining will culminate in a banquet Thursday night at Ilic Starli'.c Mold, when 'he train- ees will become probationary firemen, certified lo work any- where in Texas. TEA Guidelines Met by Trustees Abilene school Irustecs acted Monday night to re- duce minority enrollment at two elementary schools to meet Texas Education Agency guidelines. Pg. IB. Amusemenls QC Business Mirror 4B Bridge.......... 2A Ctesified 4.SC Comrcs 3C Editorials 4A Horoscope 2A Hospital Patients 6A Ob! tileries 2A Sports 1-2C To Your Good Haollh......6A TV Lcq 8C TV Scout............... 8C Women's Nsws 2.3B Free Newspaper Space Overruled WASHINGTON (AP) A unanimous Supreme Court to- day declared Hint slates can-' nol demand llial newspapers give political candidalcs. free ipacc to reply lo editorial'al-. tacks. The court overturned 'a 61-year-old Florida.law impos- ing such a requirement. The court said Ihe law violates ihe First Amendment free.press guarantee. Chief Justice Warren .E. Burger wrote for Ihc: court, "The choice of material'to go into a newspaper, and Ihe de- cisions made as lo limitations on Ihc size of the paper and content and treatment of pub- lic issues and public officials whether fair 'or unfair constitutes the exercise of edi- torial control rmd judgment." He said (he government can- not interfere with a newspa- per's judgment about what il publishes. In a separate case, ihe court In a separate'case, the court ruled 5 lo 4 that privale indi- viduals may sue news media for libel without proving reck- less disregard for (he Irulh, even when speaking on public issues. The court thus refused to ex- tend to private individuals the rule il has laid for pub- lic officials and public figures. That rule requires that public figures prove reckless disre- gard for the Irulh by Ine me- dia before they can sue for libel. In Ihe case of private indi- viduals, the court said, proof ol negligence is enough. In Ihe Florida righl-to-reply case, the courl said it has yet to be demonstrated how gov- ernment regulations over a newspaper's judgment about what it publishes could be ex- ercised consistent wilh First Amendment guarantees of a free press. The Florida law had been applied only rarely until Pat U Tornillo, a candidate for Ihc stale legislature, invoked it in support of his demand for free space in the Miami Her- ald lo reply to two critical editorials during his 1972 cam- paign. A Florida (rial courl reject- ed Tornillo's argument but Ihe Florida .Supreme Court sided wilh him. Police 'Doing Everything7 to Solve Cases By EUJE JtUCKEH 0. The people of Abilene arc fright- ened (o dcalh over these four unsolved murders in Abilene. If (he Police parlment can'l solve (hem, why can't they call in someone from another Inivn help? Vic are not safe in our own homes anymore. There has (o be some- thing done about these murders. What's going lo be done? A. "We're doing everything we says Police Chief Warren Dodson; "it we called in somebody don't know what they could do thai we're not doing." He says others work wilh them on these cases (Sher- iff's office and the Texas Hangers) and if a lead turns up in another part of Ihe state, people in lhat area assist Abilene police. Says Dodson, "At Ihis point, all we can do is hope for a break." Q. You've probably been Informed al- ready but your suggestion about switch- ing Liltle League bckstops from home plate to. center field away from street just won't work. In Cobb Park, Ihc nark In question, there happens (o be a two-story, concession stand and press box behind hameplate, bleachers and permanent lights' on Ihe field. It would he slightly ridiculous .to change Ihe field around just to keep parents from parking in the streets at Star Lillle League. A. Yes, we know lhat. We're talking about practice fields where Uiere's .notfiing more than a backstop on a dirt field. We don't know what leagues are.involved but some teams do play scheduled games on practice fields and these backstops could be. moved fairly easily. Heavens no, after all the ex- pense and effort involved in building a per- manent field, we're not about lo suggest tearing it up. Q. Each morning I pass N 1st and Graham (or Sayles if JOT prefer) and notice the continuing efforts of lo turn N. Isl a Slip 'n SI We through constant application of water. I suggest toe grass betweti N. 1st and the railroad tracks receive the heiMflt tf Ibis moisture and that we eliminate a traffic hazard at the same time. This (heonly place this but il's my target for today. A. Perry Scoll of City Parks Depl. says you have a choice no water in the streets and scrubby-looking or'dead grass and plants, or healthy plants and wnler in Ihc slreel. "When you've got a slope like thai, it's almost impossible to do a thorough lob of watering and not have some run-off." We're watering T P right of way three times a week for 20 minutes which is not an exces- sive amount of water considering each plant costs Ihe cily to and water is one of our cheapest resources." though he probably can'l do much about il, Scott said he'd drive by N. 1st and see if something different can't be done. 0. From the standpoint of automobile design aid engineering, can Ihe new noi-leaded gasoline be used by pre '7n model automobiles? Will It damage l.hese engines? Will it suhslilnlcsatisfac- torily for the regular grade of gasoline? Will it substitute satisfactorily for pcr- mium? Blast Kills 4 Austrians In Golan Heights BY THE ASSOCIATED TRESS Four Austrian soldiers of the United Nations Disengage- ment Observer Force in the Golan Heights were killed and one wounded today when a land mine exploded, a nian at U.N. headquarters in New York reported. The explosion occurred as 500 Syrian soldiers worked lo clear mines from Ilic buffer zone separating Syrian anil Is- raeli troops. The spokesman, William C. Powell, said (he victims were among UNDOF troops moving into Hie buffer zone, lie had no other details. They were Ihe first casual- ties of the observer force set up in Ihc troop disengagement agreement worked out this spring by American Secretary of Stale Henry A. Kissinger lo end 21i months of lighting in the Golan. A U.N. spokesman in Da- mascus said the Syrian sol- diers were put to work clear- ing land mines because of fears lhat (he e x p 1 o s i v e s would hamper the return lo Ihe emballled area of-Syrian civilians after the Israeli with- drawal was completed today. The spokesman said Ihe force was equipped 40 mincsweeping tanks and was expected to be in the strip be- hvccn the Syrian and Israeli armies for three days, work- ing under the supervision of the U.N. Disengagement Ob- servers Force Syrian authorities had com- plained lhat Ihc presence of the mines would slow down the return of the civilian popu- lation lo Ihe buffer area, which includes Quneilra, Ihe devastated capital of the Go- lan Heights, Ihe spokesman said. .Syrian civil authorities were planning to lake over Quncitra later today. The ruins have A. No and it recks of a plot to us. Don Childs, associate professor and head of Ihc Mobile Automotive Training Program al Texas Slate Technical Instilulc in Waco says Ihe non-leaded gas is a specially blend- ed product which, according lo car manu- facturers and the carburetor people, will nol he adequate for Ihe earlier engines. It definitely cannot be used in anything earlier than 1971 but models from '71 lo '7-1 can be modified lo operate with il. Childs says we can look forward to a shortage of leaded gasoline which will force older, model cars'off Ihe road as leaded fuel is phased onl. A fuel additive is in Ihe works now that can be added to Ihc no-lead fuel to make it compatible with Ihe older engines. Childs is sending us a copy of General Motors modification procedures (or convert- ing older cars for use of unleaded or low- leaded fuel. We'll forward it to you. Address questions (o Action Line. Abiclnc, Texas Names will not be used but questions must be signed and addresses Riven. Please Include tel- ephone numbers II possible. been held by Israel since Ihe 19G7 Arab-Israeli war, and Ilicy were handed over lo th'e U.N. force on Monday along' willi Hie last of the Syrian ter- ritory Israel seized in the war last October. Helicopter Gift By Nixon Called 'Cavalier' Move WASHINGTON (AP) Sen. Hobcrl C. Byrd; D-W.Va., says President Nixon's gift of a {2 million helicopter lo Egyptian I1 resident Anwar Sadal amounts lo a "cavalier use" of lax dollars. "The practice of foreign rela- tions is at best '.i delicate art, and it occurs (o me that efforts In purchase friendship in suclt a manner are questionable on llicir Byrcl said Monday. Nixon took the helicopter with him on his recent trip to Ihs Middle East and gave it lo Sadal while visiting Egypt. "The question lhat comes im- mediately lo mind is the ob- vious one: Was tills helicopter, assigned by the military to Mr. Nixon, his to give away to tile head of a foieign govern- Byrd asked. Byrd, assistant Senate Demo- cratic leader, said tliat "such action by Mr. .Nixon at Ibis lime seems to me to constitute "another lapse in good judg- ment." "Against (he backdrop of more important international events and more distressing do- jneslic developments, the giv- ing away of one U-S. helicopter may not in actual fact be ton Hie West Virginia senator said. But he added that "it is symptomatic of a proprietary concept of the American presi- dency that is -at variance with [he view of most Americans lhat'it should he a trusteeship." President Wants Closer Red Fly BARRY SCHWEID Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (A P) President Nixon left today for a Moscow summit with a pledge lo seek closer coopera- tion with the Soviet Union and, a lessening of "Ihc burden anil Ilircal" of nuclear weapons. In a brief statement before leaving nearby Andrews Air Force Base, Nixon listed three goals for his summit meeting wilh Soviet leaders: strengthen ties between Ihc Unilcd States and the Sovi- el Union. "develop areas of cooperation to displace areas of confronlation" elsewhere in the world, and progress toward limit- ing "both Ihe burden and (hreal of nuclear weapons." The Moscow summit is ex- pected to produce a partial ban on underground nuclear weapons Icsls and an agree- ment in principle to harness fasl-dcvcloping nuclear tech- nology. But Secretary of Stale Hen- ry A. Kissinger told a news conference Monday that Ihc third annual summit is unlike- ly lo produce a comprehensive treaty limiting offensive nuclear weapons. Nixon, Kissinger and a huge entourage were lo stop first in Brussels so that. Nixon can sign a new declaration of WEATHER" U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NeKona! Wifllttef (VrtQlhsr Map, Fq. ABILENE AND VICINITY OS-mile radiui) MoMly fair and mild through Wedntiday. windi S !o IS mph. lllqh TucMJay in Ihe upper Ms, low cvtrntghl In the 40i, Hiqh Wednesday in Ihe lower 9Oi. H'gh and law (or 24 Ttrxirs ending 9 a.m.: SJ nrxf 56 Hlgri iorne dale last year; 83 ood tJ. today: sums! lonJghl: lomcrforv: trans-Allantic cooperation wilh Ihc North Atlantic Trealy Organization on Wednesday. "Our purpose in Brussels will be to meet wilh old friends and renew our support of the great NATO Nixon said. He said he hoped (he decla- ration to be signed there would bring "new purpose and new dircclion" lo (he alliance. The chief executive spoke informally lo a group of While House employes before mak- ing the helicopter rule lo An- drews. He was accompanied to Andrews by his daughters, Tricia Cox and Julie Eisen- hower. The presidential party, In- cluding Mrs. Nixon, departed from Andrews al Si'12 a.m. In Brussels, Nixon will con- fer also wilh Italian Prime II i n i s I c r Mariano Ilumnr, West Herman Chancellor Hel- mut Schmidt, British Prime Minister Harold Wilson and NATO officials. SWtEP OUT THOH ITEMS SWEEP m CASH! With A WEEK-EIDER WMTAB 15 WOMS 3 IMS Save J1.90 Additional each No phone orderi Cain in advance Deadline 3 am Ihuridoy No refunds AMLENl KfDITEIt-NlWS   

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