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Abilene Reporter News: Friday, June 21, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 21, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                OR WITH OFFENSE'lTQ FRIENDS OR IT 94TH; YEAR, NO. 4 PHONE 673-4271 79604, FRIDAY Associated Pnu m Colson Sentence liio S Yinrs to EUJE HUCKEB Guatemala- Abilene Radio Contact Possible Q. I have a friend from Guatemala who's looking for a bam radio operator in Abilene with the range to get him In coatact with relatives there. He's he'was living in College Station then. Who can be turn to A. Tell him lo give Dr. Joe Marshall a ring at 673-1314. He's had pretty good luck getting into Guatemala on a regular basis for another person who moved here from that country. Q. I'm curious. Do they plan on leav- ing (he newly. 'constructed" Judge Ely Blvd. the way It is at Piedmont Intersec- tion? Before lie reconstruction we nev- er bad problems water pooling. Now, after (he "Improvements" we bad a small pond at this intersection and It wasn't even a real hard rain that caused it. if they spent all tbat money and effort lo Improve the boulevard, they checked into" the proper drainage. A. The sages say that patience is a virtue, so Iry being a, more -virtuous person. Offi- cials connected with the job tell us it's nowhere near completion .but when it is you'll bc-happywUh the results and won't have drainage problems at Piedmont. Q. I'm searching for a -way to make fire logs from newspapers and heard of your column In the Abilene paper. I'm from Graham. .1 need (he method and ingredients necessary to make the fire burn In different colors. I'm ready lo begin' If I just had the recipe. A. Newspaper log recipes are about lo overtake requests 'for soiir dough, but for a reader in Graham, we'll run it by one more lime. Mrs; D. F. AlcCarly's recipe calls for live pounds copper sulphate, three pounds ice cream'salt, three gallons water. Mix in a large crock or glass container (an old bathtub is -Itolliip some old news- papers arid secure at each end -with rubljcr bands. Soak three or tour weeks. Remove from mixture and dry about three or four vccks. f Q. Whal van I do lo Keep my patent I leather shoes clean and free of cracks? A. Commercial patent leather conditioners found in shoe -repair 'shops or plain old vaseline help prevent cracks in genuine pal- ent leather but we're wondering if they're really patent leather since 90 per cent of the shiny patent-looking slwes manufactured today are plastic or have a plastic finish. Nothing will prevent synthetic shoes from cracking but any liquid household cleanci' will remove scuffs and dirt, .so say the shoe repairmen. Q. What's the most versatile word IB the English language? A Lexicographers at Merriam-Websler say the winner is the little word "set." It takes up more space in their dictionary than any other word, has more than 200 mean- ings. You can set a king on a throne, walcli the sun set, set an example, sel your hair, become set in your ways, dislike set speech- es and set a record. You can watch jcllo set, relax at a tennis malch between sels, get your heart set on a new dress. Afternoon Clouds Won'l Bring Rain The recent pattern for Abilene will remain unbro- ken over the weekend and Ihe forecast calls for hot days with no precipitation. Drifts of white, puffy clouds forming In the afternoon will Ihe closest thing lo any atmos- pheric moisture in Ihe area. The cloud formalions are nor- mal for Ihis time of year, and should not get anyone's hopes up, said D. E. Eck, Weather Service forecaster. Key City residents will have lo rely on area lakes, lawn sprin- klers and swimming pools for any relief from the dry heat for several days, the forecast indi- cates. WASHINGTON (A P) Colson, once one Nixon's highcst- .'advisers was scn- Mcnced Iqday-lo serve one to 'three years, in'.prison for ob- structing justice. U.S. District Judge'Gerhard A.' Gesell also imposed a fine. Maxiimim penalty on the charge would have been five '.'years .in prison and a fine.-- WEATHER U.S. DflPAMTMEIir Of COMMERCE HJtiwwt Scrvkt ABILENE AWD VICINITY Ctarr lo portly cloudy today ItiroiwTi Saturday, Continued he I oHcr- roons. High Frlrfiy In Kb, law Frldcv riotil fn Ihe mTtJdlc 70s. High Saturday rwor 100. Surth lo southwest winds 10 lo 30 mpK High anJ (or 74 ending 9 irvd law date loit ytor: 85 ortd U Sunrlie iunscl tonlghl: tcmororw 314'year's Iworkcd day and night. I 'believed I was making a great'-personal sac- rifice for my Colson said before sentencing. He said he had been "an arrogant sel'-assured man in the ruthless exercise of pow- er." Colson said he now knows is, even for a. strong man lose perspec- live "This ;e x p e r i e'n c e has brought a complete re-exami- natibn of myself and I will spend the rest of my.life re- gretting what I have he said. 4A f e r Colsoa's 12-minulc statement to judge, his lawyer spent a full naif-hour asking that Colson be placed on probation rather than be sent to prison... ".Attorney David I. Shapiro told Gesell.lhal.'.Colson should nol be sent to prison because of "public expectations." He sending Colsoii: to prison "would be, in'iiiy" view, a most popular decision. It would also be a terribly short- sighted oiic." The judge interrupted him "You're barking up the -wrong tree you are beating a dead horse." Gcsell said public opinion would not. sway Mm one way or-the oth- er. As he sentenced the; defen- dant, Gosell said, "The court does recognize that Colson's public image was somewhat that he had to send him to prison. The seatence means Ihat Colson must serve at least one year al an institution not yet judge gave him until July 8 to surrender. Colson had been charged with conspiracy to obstruct justice and obstructing justice in Ihe Watergate cover-up case and with conspiracy lo Lawyers: .violate-the civil rights of Dan- iel Ellsberg's 'psychiatrist in the plumbers case. Both those charges were dismissed today. Colson pleaded guilty on June 3 lo a newly drawn charge 'or obstructing justice. In- that-plea-he admitted that'in "1071 he concocted awd carried out a scheme to "de- fame and'destroy the public image and credibility" of.Dan- iel Ellsberg, then nearing trial in Papers case. Exempt From Criminal Process Saved by a Sofa Kirk Troy and liis wife, Sylvia, Angeles comfort each other as tliey survey the damaged living room of. their home after the automobile Whjch they were backing out of the.garage Thurs- day suddenly sped forward. The car was slapped by a sofa which prevented it from plunging through'-.a.window and down a 100-foot cliff; (AP Wirephbto) Putnam Is Down to Its Last Tank By SCOTT TAGLIAR1NO Slaff Writer .PUTNAM The community of Putnam was down to the water in Hie lines Friday morning, witli the mayor and water superintendent o u I changing the water lines lo another stock laiik. PUTNAM, a rural conirnuni- ly of 134 residents In Callahan County, has been in and out of water for Ihe past three months, since the city's main water supply, the three-acre Lake Putnam, has been dry since late March. The town has had lo use private slock lo provide water. "We're out of water Ihis morning except what is in Ihe lines' L G. Mobley, a long-time resident of Putnam, said IViday. Tn fact Jloblcy was one of only a few Putnam residents who cculil be reached for a comment Friday morning, be- cause bolh the mayor, John D. Isenhowcr, and Ihe water su- perintendent ,-W. D. Fleming, Old Women Said To Be Poorest CHICAGO (AP) -The U.S. Commission on Civil Ttiglils plans to investigate Ihe lack of social security credit for homemakers, Ihe heart of the commission says. "There arc inequalities built into the social security system as far as women arc con- Commission Chair- man Arthur S. Flemmins said Wednesday at Ihe close of a three-day commission hearing here on women and poverty. Hemming said Ihe of federal retirement insurance for unpaid housewives "should be looked al carefully." Flemming added that "older women are by far Ihe poorest segment of American socie- ty." He said single women over 65 receive a median in- come of a year half of the annual income of men in Ihe snmc age bracket. were out changing the city's water line lo another stock tank. The city has gone through five such slock tanks since Lake Pulnain went dry, Mob- Icy explained, and Ihe one they're hooking up to "Old Cooper" is [lie last one available. "The cost to go to any other tanks around would be un- reachable for the Mobley said. Currently, the main for Pulnain residents is to join the Saxbe: No Dirty Tricks for FBI QUAXT1CO, Va, (AP) Ally. .Gen. William B. Saxbc has warned FBf law enforce- ment officers that "hunters, should not adopt the tactics of the hunted." "Dirty tricks are over in politics and at the Saxbe lold 200-officers Thurs- day at the FBf National Acad- emy here. lie said Ihere was a need for "proper" intelligence gather- ing operations when national security is jeopardized. But he referred to a memo 'made public last year-about an FBI campaign to break up Ihe Lefl, and said the FBf in that case had over- stepped the requirements of national security. Saxbe urged the officers to be "totally fair at all times and to prolecl Ihe rights of the individual and of society." Desert Water Corporation in Eastlahd punip water into Lake Putnam from 'Lake' Leon, 30 miles away. ANOTHER R E S 11) E N t, 'Jlrs.. R.B. Cunningham, said that almost all Ihe residents have put up a deposit lo join the corporation mid 'pay for an engineering survey to see if Ihe project is feasible. Help is also being solicited from the stale. In April, Mob- Icy and Isenhowor holh went lo Austin to'talk Quality Board about a: grant lo help finance the Lake Leon Project, but they had no help lo offer, Mobley said. "They lold us we just better KO back and pray for he said, So for now, Puniani can.rely on waler for. another week, bc- cause it doesn't look like ruin is coming any lime soon. "We've never had a drought like this one that I can re- member, and I can remember '33 and '34. By w. DALE NELSON Associalcil Press Writer WASHINGTON (A P) President Nixon's lawyers lold tlie Supreme Court today a U.S. president "is not subject to the criminal process wheth- er that process is invoked di- rectly or indirectly." But special Watergate prose- cutor Leon Jawdrski respond- ed that the framers of (he Constitution "were very care- ful to provide for.a presidency with defined and limited con- stitutional powers-anil-hot the prerogatives arid immunities of a The statements were in briefs filed with the court in connection with .'arguments scheduled for July 8 on the President's claim of executive privilege to White House; which'are'Wanted'for the Wat- ergate coverup trial. In a 119-page legal brief Hie White House argued that the high court should overturn a U.S. District court ruling which would require the Presi- dent !o turn over tape record- ings of 64 conversations. The W at e r g a t e special prosecutor says this material is essential for the trial in the Watergate cover-up case. Oral arguments in the evi- dence dispute are scheduled in the Supreme "Court for July 6 in a rare and historic summer session. White House yer James D..SI. Glair said ihat few cases .in the nation's history "have cut so close to the heart of the basic .constitu- tional system in which our lib- erties are rooted al ils core, (his is a case that turns on the separation of powers." Husband, Wife Split One Job CLINTON, N'.Y. (API A young Chicago couple couldn't lind teaching jobs in the samp, city so they decided to split a single job and salary here. "We were perfect Tor the job" said Nancy llabinowilz. She and her husband will take the litle of assistant professor of literature at Kirkland Col- lege here July 1. They will each leach three courses a year at the four-year liberal arts college. Inflation Rate Returns to Old Ways By R. GREGORY M1KKS Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON1 (AP) The annual rate of inllaliqn in con- sumer prices returned lo dou- ble digit levels in May follow- ing Ihe April slowdown, Ihe Labor Department reported today. Consumer prices in M a y were 10.7 per cent above a year earlier and, if the May inflation rale continued for the next 12 months, would be more than 13.2 per cent higher Ihan now at the end of the next 12 months, (he depart- ment said. The May increase in the Consumer Price Index was 1.1 per cent. Tllis compared with a sixtenlhs of one per cent increase in April. The Nixon administration hopes lo bring inflation down lo a seven per cent annual rale by year's end. There were sharply higher prices last monlh for a wide range of goods and services, including food, health serv- ices, clothing and used cars. Among the bad news report- ed in the Hay index was a nine-tenths of one per cent in- crease in food prices on a sea- sonally adjusted basis, revers- ing the four-lenlhs of one per cent decline in April. Prices of fresh vegetables were up 19 per ccnl in May, much worse than usual for this time of year. Also in- creasing rapidly were prices for fresh frulls, cereal and bakery products, sugar and sweets, and processed fruits and vegetables, the depart- ment said. The only Favorable consum- er trends in the food area were lower prices for meals, poultry and eggs. The May increase of 1.1 per ccnl in the CPI was bolh on a seasonally adjusted and unad- justed basis. The index slood in al H5.6 of the 1967 average of 100, meaning il cost lo buy what S1QO purchased in the 1967 survey. The big1 increase seemed certain to increase demands in Congress and among consum- er groups for new initialivcs lo bring inflation under con- Irol. Thc Labor Department said prices of nonfood consumer goods increased 1.6 per cent in Jlay, considerably more Ihan usual for Ihe monlh. New and used cars, furniture, appli- ances, reading materials, household supplies and gaso- line prices continued to climb. The May report covered Ihe first monthly period since the government's wage and price controls program expired completely on April 30. How- ever, it had expired for many major sections of the economy much earlier. Doctors ami hospital fees were among Ihose kept under conlrols until Ihe lasl. The La- bor Department said Ihere was a 1.2 per cent increase in medical care costs in May. In a separate report, the de- partment said real spendable earnings of workers increased seven-tenlhs of one per ccnl in Hay, the first monthly in- crease since last September but still 4.6 per cent below a year earlier. The real spendable earnings statistic is designed lo mea- sure the actua'i purchasing power of workers' paychecks after deductions for Social Se- curity and federal income tax- es. Measured in terms of 1967 buying power, real spendable weekly earnings averaged In May, up from ?90.56 in April. In terms of current dollars, average spendable weekly earnings, were in May, up from in April. "All oilier considerations are secondary, because pre- ervitig (he integrity of the sep- aration of powers is vital lo I he preservation of our Consti- tution as a living body of fun- damental SI. Clair con- tended. President Naaa lost court baliles over access to tapes last fall in U.S. District Court and the U.S. Court of Appeals. He then'provided-Ihe record- ings al issue in that case.rath- er than take Ihe controversy lo the Supreme Court. Nixon asked the -Supreme Court Thursday to give him access to the evidence which led the Watergate grand jury to name him as an unindictcd co-conspirator. Red Square MOSCOW (AP) Red Square will be closed until No- vember for repairs including a hlock-by-Mocfc restoration of Lenin's tomb, the Soviet news agency Tass rcporls. Numbers have been painleil on the red granite blocks of the 44-year-old mausoleum so it can be put back together after it is dismantled. The work will also include reinforcement of the earth neath the cobblestone square and a facelift for the Spassky Tower, the main tower ef the Kremlin. Tass explained that inter- continental ballistic missiles and olhcr enormously heavy military hardware that has passed across the'square dur- ing parades have damaged the gran-ite cobblestones and caused the earth bcnoalh Iheni to sag. Local Retirees Are SCORE-'mg Retired businessmen ore Finding plenty fo do os members of SCORE, a vol- untary organization which aids small businessmen who need expert advice. Two Abilenians active with SCORE disiuss the program on Pg. 1-B. NEWS INDEX Amusements 53 Business Mirror 1A Bridge 1QA Classified............ 3-IOC Comics................ 78 Editorials 4A Horoscope 13A Hospital Patients1 .66 Obituaries IOC Sports 1C To Your Gocd Hcollh......8B Trovcl I2-13A TV Lcq 5B TV Scout 58 Women's News..... 3B Army Boosts Recruiter Pay WASHINGTON (AP) The Army has boosted special pay for some army recruiters lo as high as a month. The Army said it hopes ftie increased payments vill at- tract "highly motivated and capable recruiters." Only those Army recruilcrs who are directly involved in the field will be eligible for the increased pay. Those serv- ing at headquarters will con- tinue lo receive the old special rale of 550 a monlh.   

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