Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Abilene Reporter News: Tuesday, June 11, 1974 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 11, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES IT GOES''--By rpri 83RD.YEAR, NO. 359 PHONE 673-4271 JUNE PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Autotuaed Prea (JP> By EUJU RUCKEB 'No Parking' Signs At Games Won't Work Q. Now (hat the Little Leagues have begun, a dangerous bottleneck exists on Forest St. between State and N. IWh. Two-way traffic is Impossible and it's an obstacle coarse for one car to gc( through with kids darting out and so much activity la (hat area.1 Could the city please pnt up "No Parking" signs en the east side of Forest? A parking lot In (he park could DC used by the people. A. "We have so many of these games going on all over the city, there's no way we could do -says Traffic Engineer Bud Taylor. ''If we- did- it '-for one street we'd have to lake parking off streets all dyer Just .a thought you might suggest to ballgame officials next year-thai they con- sider placing. home plate and the.backstop at the opposite end of the field. instead, of next to the street where mosl of them are presently located. People have a tendency to park near home plate 'and watch the game from their cars. This might help take some traffic off the streets and would certainly be safer for ihe kids to chase foul balls in the field ralher than the street'. For this sum- mer though, your problems are about lo end; Little League season is drawing to a close. Q. Where can I get my car's speedom- eter checked for accuracy? I need every mile per hour I can get now with the 5o-mnh speed limits. A. We've sent you the name of an autoijio bile electric service company: that checks speedometers. The Department of Public. Safety can fell you of at least one other place. Q. Can you find out why there's been such an increase of low Hying small airplanes over the I.ylle Shores area recently? These planes are evidently preparing to laid as they cut their en-. gines directly over our house. (That lends a ground observer an eerje Can this practice expected lo continue indefinitely? A. Yes, it'll continue, says Airport Manag- er Glenn Meeks, because when the 'wind >s out of the as it usually is, the traffic pattern is 'over Lylle Shores. He's, puzzled over -the increase in flights though, says there's hot been a substantial. increase in number of at least not enough lo be: noticeable. The airport -control Lower has made.no change in its operation; Lylle's been part. of 'the. traffic pattern since 1969. Jleeks says though, it it's causing a prob- lem, he'll be happy to talk with you and try to work out other arrangements because he wants lo remain on good terms with his neighbors. Q. Please tell the lady who has looked all over Ipini for silk stockings thai they can he found in tie J-C. Penney spring catalog page number A1Z1IHBD. I understand her -predicament. I'm also allergic nylon. A. This might work for some but the good lady in the Penney catalog order depart- ment looked up the- number you gave us and [he corresponding ileni describes semi-sheer nylon stockings ivllh cotton soles. .This might help if only a person's feet are allerg- ic to nylon which is sometimes Ihe case. Action Line concluded a couple of years ago lhal silk stockings can be found only in memory books. Q. Where can I get a bumper sticker that says, "Bald Is I know somebody who would really enjoy It. A. Yea, uh-huh, you belter check on thai before you deliver this neat gift. Tommy Kvans at 1870 Jackson does silk screen bumper stickers as a hobby. If you can find 24 other good-natured baldies who want a bumper sticker singing Iheir praises, he'll make up a batch for you. Check with Evans at- 673-1411. While you're at il, see if he'll make up a' tew "Fat is Fabulous" signs for Aclion Line's Car. Address questions lo Aclion Line, Box 31, Ablleie, Texas 7MW. Names win not he used but questions must nc signed aid addresses given. Please imclode tel- ephone limbers if possible. ____ Blind Operator At Switchboard Operating a mobile unit switchboard is no easy task and for Debbie Kimbrough it is even more of an oc complishment. Miss Kim- brougtv no's been blind since birth, Her story and picture ore on Pg. IB. Arnu'scmenls Comics Editorial! Horoscope Hospital Patients Obituaries Good Hcoilh' TV Loo TV Scout Women's News SALZBURG, Austria Secretary of State. Henry A'. Kissinger said today he would resign unless the controversy over-Iris role in national. secu- rity wire tapping was cleared His voice breaking with cmpiion, .Kissinger said the controversy is hurting Ameri- ca's foreign policy. "I do not believe.il is possi- ble. to conduct Ihe foreign poli- cy of Ihe United- States under these he told a news conference. "If il is not cleared up I Kissinger, his eyes: 'glisten- ing with tears, claimed that. leaks to the news media de- famed -his'honor.and 'reput'a: -lion.-. "It is nblpossib'le to conduct, national policy ...under' this sort of he said-in deliver; ing his threai.tb qiiii. The. Prize-winning diplomat, again denying'he or- dered wiretaps his subordi- called ;upon the.-'.Senate'. Foreign Kelalions Committee to reopen its hearings; to in- vestigate the controversy. Kissinger'is 'here en-route 'with President Nixon to the Middle.East. It-was there ear- lier this month-that Kissinger, workirig.as a mediator, helped bring about the Israeli-Syrian military disengagement pact Mhat has'cleared, the.way: for a" MJdeasl .'peace con- fer'ence ih'Gc'neya..' conference; Kis- VsjngerHyas referring tolallega; -.tionsr'stemming 'Jrom "''.reports'. that'he h'ad-prdered Nvir.etaps 1 .oh' administration officials who had'access..t.o'national se- curity ..documents; that '.w.ere leaked to the .press. Iri'his confirmation' hearings before tlie Senate-, Foreign 15- -17, 'Kissinger .denied ordering -the'tap's. then he .had .provid- ed the names of officials who., had access to: the but had not suggested the laps nor did he ever order, UiTn used. He.also'said he-had received only infrequent reports of'the .taps' and then only, for.1.10 months. This all place .when he was president: Nix- .Tapes of. conversations be- tween Nixon 'and other'offi- cials recently heard in the House. Judiciary Committee supposedly quoted the Presi- dent as saying Kissinger had initiated some wiretaps. Kissinger lold a news con- ference last week the Presi- dent must; have been under' .some, "misapprehension" or the tape was unclear.. al thai news.con; j' x- I HOPE CALDERON new lifeguard at Johnson Park Stiff PIUTI by Oivli Lightweight Becomes Heavier in Water Hope Caldcron .is a small woman wilh a big job. .She's a. pound young woman with the respon- sibility of lifeguard at- Johnson Park al Lake Fort Phantom. Miss Caldcron is confident she won't have any difficulty rescuing a swimmer in trou- ble, and she has the training lo back her confidence. 'T really haven't had any trouble since we opened, and don't think I'll have any prob- she said. Related slgrv, Pg. IB She has senior lifesaving certificates fru'm Cross and.the Y.MC.V arid .a brown belt [iij judo, .so she doesn't Ihinli she'll have any. problems she can't handle. MISS CAIDPRQN. 23, who is living''wltli her parents, Jilr. and Jlrs. Fernando. Caldefon at 201 is speech pathology; N'orrh-TeMis'State.iUnivcrsity. She enjojs i earning her monej jn the sun during the summei months: "I also guarded at the Slate year! thclpool' .was added. Miss': Calderon'. arid her I co- man .at ACC, have beeri man- -ning their posts since the park- .Earning J2..an hour; the two lifeguards" seven days a 8 p.m. Monday Favors Gold WASHINGTON (A P) Treasury Secretary William Simon said today he hopes it will be possible for Ameri- cans" to own gold the end of this year. Simon (old a House Banking and Currency subcommittee that he favors allowing Ameri- cans to own gold, which now is prohibited. President Nixon has aulhori- ly from Congress to remove the ban at any time-and .Si- mon said he hopes this will be possible "before the end of the year unless there are damag- ing developments." Simon appeared before. Ihe Housc.subcommiUee, .which, is; considering U.S. contributions to [he international Develop-.: 'men't-.A s c i a t i 6 n, which makes Interest free ment loans to the world's poor-- cst countries.. The-Sehate already -has' ap- proved- in appropriation, but with a stipulation-tn'at" Ameri- cans should be' free Io -own gold effective Sept. 1. The. House, subc'ommillec, which preMously 'turned dmvn Ihe also' is consider- ing setting a gold owning dale as 'a condition -for 'passage 'of Ihe bill, say sources. Simon said he opposes fixmg a dale, because unless'time is through Saturday and 10 lo 8 p.m.'on Sunday USUALLY get about 50 .to .100 'people here a'.dayvoii Polls' explained, that- -keeps, us pretty busy." Jliss Calderon doesn't be- lieve her job is any thing-out of- .'the "We're getting-a lot of sun out here, but I'm trying-not to get sun she said. right, il could have "an 'adverse impact on world finances.' :lle also1 sajd'lt could "hani- per" "current'.negotiations on interhational monetary r e- fprni, of .which the Mture of gold is lo be part of the.re- form-package. Simon also raised the possi- biiily lhal the U.S., gbyehi: nient-might sell some of its billion from its official', gold slocks. Private' trading of gold in Ihe United have an anti-inflalion .impact" when the time is right, .Simon said. .Gold ownership restrictions have been in effect since 199. '-'Treasury of f i c i-a 1 s have .maintained for some time that i n e government.-" eventually will sell gold, but lhal the main consideration is when arid how. 'Some administration offi- cials believe, the private own- ership of gold would hurl Ihe economy. Their theory is that if'.Americans spend Iheir dol- gold, they will bellj'u'y- ing less of something else. World demand for gold has sent piiccs soaring--" Prices been driven even.higher ,by sneculators buying gold in anlicipation of even ..higher nrices.- ference he changed.Ihis ver- sion slightly by saying he hud ordered any Kissinger-disclosed, he hud sent a letter lo 'Sen.'J.' W. Fulbright, D-Ark'.; chairman of the Foreign Relations Com- mittee, suggesting thai the panel reopen its hearings on the wiretap conlrovcrsy. He said'he would break off from Nixon's Middle East trip and return to Washington lo testify if necessary. Asked If he would withdraw his threat, to resign if Ful- bright's committee gave him a "clean bill of Kis- singer "Yes." He said there might be other ways lo quiet, the controversy, but did not specifically sug- gest-any. .During a Foreign Relations Comrhillee hearing on foreign aid lasl .week, Kissinger again repeated, his earlier state- merits. memr hers suggested "it ..might ;be_ necessary to reopen the ler, if only to support the relary's statements. With aides only lhal the secretary "wanted to: get some things off his Kissinger summoned lo the 18th century gues'P house on short notice. Kachig-a- crowd of spondents and'a'bank of cairtC eras in a high-ceilinged. dran'i" ing room, Kissinger spoke lemporanepiisly for more than" a halt hour, then', answered questions, for another 30 utes. Case Severed From .WASHINGTON (AP) A federal judge today severed the conspiracy Ifial of John D. Ehrlichman from that of three other, defendants in. ihe EIIs- bcrg bfejk-in case.- U.S. District Judge Gerhard A, Gesell said -President Nix- on's refusal, to allow Elirlich- man and His lawyers' access lo the files he needs', for his dc- fepse il foi- the '.'court To. .devils duty" lo conduct a fair trial. James D.'St.ClDir, Presi- dent 'Nixon's' chief Watergate lawyer, told Gcsell on .Monday lhat 'the President still .re- served the final say over what materials from Ehrlichman's own files the former-domestic- aide could use. "The proposal is unaccepta- ble, said, "Jt denies h'jm the-ripht of counsel." Gesell'Has'said that he, not would be 'the. final judge of material could be: admilled .as .evidence .at Ejirlichman's trial. Gesell had threatened to dis- miss -the.case against Ehrlich- man entirely unless Nixon agreed to release the material sought by Ehrlichman for his defense.. Instead he sc-vered Khrlich- man's case and said Ehrlich- man later. other three defendants go on trial on Monday. The -t h r e e who' will be tried Monday are G. Gordon Uddy, Bernard L. Barker and Eugenio Martinez, who were convicted previously in connection with the Walergale break-in: Ehrlichnir.n, Liddy, .Barker ani! Martinez are charged with conspiracy to violate Ihe WEATHER U.S. OEPAKTM6HT OF COMMERCE r Serv-ee ABILENE AND VICINITY (I0-milt rodlus) Clwr lo. partly and Ihrwnh wipds ft mpri-' Hfgh offernoon ar.'! Wednesday -n Ihe SCs. Lo.v 10- nfoht in the upper 40s.' end low lor'JI hours ending a.m.: W 47. :Hlan and low same dale lasl year: 14 S-'ji-i'se fcnighf: Sunrise tomorrosv: .rights of. .Daniel Ellsberg's- Dr. Lewis Field-, ing, by sending White House agents into Fielding's office Kti'rlichman is also charged with three counts of lying to a grand jury aiid one o'f Iving lo There w a s no 'indication wlic'ri will go to Gesell called today's hear- ing to learn from Rhriich- man's: -.lawyers- whelher the latest St. Clair proposal over access to Erhlichman's While House -files was acceptable lo tliem. Uiidcr Itia proposal. Ehrlich- man woiild be able to examine i the files while .the lawyers waited .in an adjoining room. EhrJichniiii'i would-be free to consull with his when- .ever he but they would 'allowed to see Ihe files themselves. Weather Fabric In Same Weave The fabric of tha- week's weather is'-apparently not going to change, forecasters at. the National Weather Service, said Tuesday, as Mother Nature may be weaving .the.same conditions until Friday. Forecaster Dan-ell Crawford'-' said "fair and be the rule until the effect-of ;an approaching-- cold front begins to be fell later in the week. "Until it crosses the it's hard Crawford sa.id of the, front's effect, "ft's sfi'll too far off lo tell much about il'.'l One change in the weather pattern was noted, however. The high pressure system, which was causing cool air to circulate into the area Monday, has shift- ed to .the east. Because of this, Ihe flow; is now southerly and is bringing in warm moisl air from'the' Gulf, Crawford explained. Otherwise, he added, the weather tapestry "looks like the same old story." Alcohol Big i 1 ill Mental Illness 3B By JOE DACY II Keporter-News Slalf Writer .Of all Ihe nersons commit; led to mental instiluiioris in- voluntarily, it is Hie acute al: coholic who makes up thc-nia- jority, and more 'and more symptoms of mental illness arc. being discovered in these patients. Preston'K. Harrison, su- perintendent of Big Spring Slate Hospital, said more'than' 52 per cent of the patients admitted in the fiscal year ginning September, 1972, were alcoholics, lie added, that, while this percentage is on the Increase, incidence of "real mental illness" is also on the rise. "BY AND LARGE, Involun- Thtrd: five stories lary.cpmmiiments are second 'and.'third admissions- of alcoholicsSvho" left too soon (under voluntary co.m nyi 1-. mail) he added, "90 per have been here be- fore, perhaps several times. "Alcoholism is real big 'he' "and niore and more alcoholics are showing Teal sy'nip- loms." Although' re- cords separately as alcohollsnv commitments and commit- ments, for mental health rea- sons, the two types of Involun- tary commitment overlap. alcoholics. "treated at hospital, that- iaiiegprji. as ;a Iq. Ihe p'ntienls, who .resent being: mentally However, in an -increasing number of cases, if .Ihe.-alco- holic is coming in for. the sec-' and -or Ihird. time, or if.-lnie '-'rnerifal illness hasibeen deter- mined, .the latter term (is ap- .Most of Ihe eorfimitrrients al the hospital, -more -than Itwo- are voluntary, admis- sions, Harrison- said. But. dur- ing the last .'complete; fiscal year, 634 admis- sions were made, 54 from .Taylor'Cpunly, The term "lijvpluplary-cqni- mitmenr.'iis'used in this case to mean -a court-ordered 'ad- mission of no more than 90 days. Abpul'90-per these Harrison said, were for alco- holism. Harrison stressed thai treat- ment of alcoholics, as lar as medication is concerhcfJ, is rel- atively rhild. Pirsl the -patient is '.'dried pr allowed lo'go through Ihe withdrawal syniplpms of Ihe drug Then, initial medication'is administered to prevent de- lirium', tremcns, a stale of acute mental'confusion, char- acterized by anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, delusions and incoherence, and caused by alcohol poisoning. .Other than this initial medi- tation, no oilier drugs are used, Harrison said. FINALLY the patient begins group therapy and Alcoholics Anonymous programs. The treatment is incorporated in the person's.lifestyle, and he is then released lo continue treatment within his home community, -Harrison ex- plained The other 10 per.cenl of in- volunlary commitments are marte up of those patients who suffer one of two different types of mental illness: neu- rosis or psychosis. Harrison said symptoms of mental illness include an in- ability to relate lo others, de- pression, lack of motivation, forget fulness, inability lo make judgments, inability to per- form in a social setting, sus- t' picion and fcel- ing lhat everyone is out lo "gel" the person. It is in this realm in which Harrison said he has seen an increase in the number of cas- es admitted to the hospital. NEUROTICS, HE explained are -suffering ious, .tense, hung up on some- thing, and cannot eat or sleep.. They respond lo' treatment Harrison said the treatment is first in the form of mild Irahquilizcrs "to make sure Ihe patient is comfortablc'and will sleep will at night." Then, ;is with alcoholics, group therapy sessions arc scheduled. 'They r c s p ft n d See MENTAL, Pg, SA, Col. I -1..   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication